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Have you wake up your mummy? Options
bihunsedap
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:11:48 PM

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I asked him to wake up his mother.

After a while,he came back.
I asked him
"Have you wake up your mummy?"
"Did you wake up your mummy?"

I am a bit confusing for have and did.
In the context above, which is the correct one?
sureshot
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:04:57 AM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
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bihunsedap wrote:
I asked him to wake up his mother.

After a while,he came back.
I asked him
"Have you wake up your mummy?"
"Did you wake up your mummy?"

I am a bit confusing for have and did.
In the context above, which is the correct one?

_________________________


The choice between the use of present perfect and simple past depends on whether the speaker sees the action as related to the present or as in the past. The present perfect tense tells us about the past and something about the present. It is used for an action in the period leading up to the present. Recent actions in the present perfect often have results in the present. It implies that the state exists now. The present perfect is generally used for recent actions when the time is not mentioned. However, when the time is given, it is natural to use simple past. The simple past means a finished time and it does not tell us about the present. It implies that the state is over.

In your question, the first option is correct. However, the correct form of the main verb is " woken". The past participle of "wake" is "woken". With "have" you use past participle form of the verb. The question should be:

- Have you woken up your mummy?

Let us now understand another situation. Before going to bed, you had told the boy to wake up his mother at 7am. It is now 9am. The action to wake up his mother should have been done two hours ago. In such a case, the use of simple past is correct. The question has the form:

- "Did you wake up your mummy (at 7am)?"


NKM
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:22:58 AM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Sureshot is right, but you might want to know that many (probably most) Americans use "waked" instead of "woken" as the past participle —

- "Have you waked up your mommy?"


See this
You know who I am
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 9:38:07 AM

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Joined: 1/13/2017
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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
NKM wrote:
Sureshot is right, but you might want to know that many (probably most) Americans use "waked" instead of "woken" as the past participle —

- "Have you waked up your mommy?"


See this


Americans! Brick wall

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 4:47:25 PM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
Disagree about the "most Americans" comment. Try to be nice -- it's difficult, I know.
bihunsedap
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 4:32:08 AM

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Joined: 11/26/2014
Posts: 1,166
Neurons: 5,828
Thanks all.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 11:51:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
You know who I am wrote:
Americans! Brick wall


Ho ho! Dancing

It's not all Americans (and it's not only Americans!)

I would have said "Have you wakened your mummy?" or maybe "Did you waken your Mummy?"

I tend to use the older inflections.

waken (transitive) = to cause someone to become awake. I wakened him. Can you waken me at eight?
awaken (intransitive) = to become awake. I awoke at eight. He awakes at six every day.

EDITED to add a line:
I also use the 'up' versions. I woke him up. Can you wake me up at eight? Did you waken your mummy up?

Quote:
Usage: Where there is an object and the sense is the literal one wake (up) and waken are the commonest forms: I wakened him; I woke him (up). Both verbs are also commonly used without an object: I woke up. Awake and awaken are preferred to other forms of wake where the sense is a figurative one: he awoke to the danger
Collins

Quote:
Usage: American dialects vary in the way that certain verbs form their principal parts. Northern dialects seem to favor forms that change the internal vowel in the verb—hence dove for the past tense of dive, and woke for wake: They woke up with a start. Southern dialects, on the other hand, tend to prefer forms that add an -ed to form the past tense and the past participle of these same verbs: The children dived into the swimming hole. The baby waked up early.
American Heritage

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Nikitus
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:33:35 PM

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Joined: 9/17/2013
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Location: Viña del Mar, Valparaiso, Chile
I read the discussion I believe it is very interesting. I think some times we tend to think that the inhabitants of a country speak the same way, when they often have different ways of expressing themselves, depending on where they live. In addition, some forms of expression are not exclusive to a single country. Very interesting, thanks.
NKM
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 3:13:48 PM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,123
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Quite often those "regionalisms" fail to respect the supposed boundaries of their regions.

And, aside from the many quirks of our language, we all have our own idiosyncrasies.

I can't remember ever using the past participle of "wake up," though I may have done so once or twice in my life. If I did, I guess I'd have chosen "woken up" as being slightly less awkward than "wakened up." In general, I'm more likely to have sought to ease my quandary by means of circumlocution.

"Wake up" and "woke up" feel perfectly normal to me:
- "I usually don't wake up much before eight in the morning, but yesterday I woke up about six."

But synonyms and circumlocutions take over for the perfect tenses:
- "In fact, lately I've been waking up early more often than I used to."
- "Several times this month I've been awake before six-thirty."
- "I had almost never gotten up that early."


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