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Return to school vs return it to school Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 4:53:56 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 2,142
We received a letter from the nursery to complete a survey.
It reads as follows:
Dear parents
Please can you complete the attached survey. This is sent on behalf of Leeds City Council.
Please can you return to school by ....
Should it not say "please can you return it(survey) to school.."?
How do we know when to omit "it" or "pronoun" in the given context?
TMe
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:17:48 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 192
Neurons: 1,324
We received a letter from the nursery to complete a survey.
It reads as follows:
Dear parents
Please can you complete the attached survey. This is sent on behalf of Leeds City Council.
Please can you return to school by ....
Should it not say "please can you return it(survey) to school.."?
How do we know when to omit "it" or "pronoun" in the given context?
needs editing

In my opinion, it should be addressed as follows.

We received a letter from the nursery department of the school to complete a survey.
It reads as follows:
Dear parents,
Please complete the attached survey and return it to the school by..... This is being sent on behalf of Leeds City Council.


Deliberate practice of one hour is worth ten hours of normal practice.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 7:45:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,129
Neurons: 130,657
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It is not a well-written letter.

If they had written
"Please can you complete the attached survey. This is sent on behalf of Leeds City Council.
Please can you return it to school by ...."

It would really (even if illogically) mean "Please return the Leeds City Council to school."

As TMe shows, it would be better to put the two requests about the survey together - then give the extra data about the council.

**************
To answer your first main question - the pronoun should not be omitted.
"Please return to school" means "please go back (in person) to school".

The omission is a habit of some "office-worker" or "businessman" types of people and is not properly grammatical.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:49:00 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 2,142
Thanks
thar
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 3:39:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 14,893
Neurons: 58,936
I have to disagree slightly - this sounds like the style of English used in instructions - it is not what you would actually say to someone. It omits pronouns, possessives, articles.

Eg
Sign - please do not place feet on seats.
Conversation - please don't put your feet on the seats.

Written Instruction -Affix stamp here
Spoken - stick your stamp here

Written - Dogs must be carried.
Spoken - Pick up your dog and carry it up the escalator.


Written - if found, please return to owner.
Spoken - if you find this please return it to the owner.

Written - Return to sender
Spoken - send this back to the sender

Written - complete form and return to school.
Spoken - complete this form and return it to your school.


I don't think it is bad grammar. It is just instructional style.

Normal, in its place.
Whether that place is in a letter to parents is questionable. In a letter, as opposed to a sign, you can use all the fiddly little words. You don't need the instructional style.




You know who I am
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 10:32:04 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 491
Neurons: 4,156
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Well, since "return" is a transitive and intransitive verb (can take or not a direct object), omitting the pronoun (It) would give it a slightly different meaning:

Please, return it to the school by - Please, return the letter to the school by..

Please, return to the school by - Please, come back to the school by..

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
thar
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 11:34:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 14,893
Neurons: 58,936
True, but only if you want it to. The context usually overrides any potential ambiguity.
Clearly here you are returning the form.
It makes no sense if you read it as telling you to go back to school.
You are not returning anywhere. You are returning something.

The transitive verb is used with an implied object in instructions.


There are a lot of phrases that have to be read in context, as they could theoretically have another meaning. Whistle

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:52:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 25,129
Neurons: 130,657
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
thar wrote:
I have to disagree slightly - this sounds like the style of English used in instructions

Instructions?

Nobody instructs me to do anything!
If they want it done, they can ask nicely . . .Whistle

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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