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Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid. Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 2:01:48 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 8:29:44 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)

Swim or sink - it is a tough choice...
dave argo
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:14:33 PM

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Daemon wrote:
Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)


Things weighty and solid have a way of keeping to the high ground where fame can't reach.
They may be left high and dry, of course.Think
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 2:56:24 PM

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Context from: Essays, Civil and Moral.

LIII

Of Praise


PRAISE is the reflection of virtue; but it is ab the glass or body which giveth the reflection. If it be from the common people, it is commonly false and naught; and rather followeth vain persons than virtuous. For the common people understand not many excellent virtues. The lowest virtues draw praise from them; the middle virtues work in them astonishment or admiration; but of the highest virtues they have no sense of perceiving at all. But shows, and species virtutibus similes [qualities resembling virtues], serve best with them. Certainly fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swoln, and drowns things weighty and solid. But if persons of quality and judgment concur, 1 then it is (as the Scripture saith) nomen bonum instar unguenti fragrantis [a good name like unto a sweet ointment]. It filleth all round about, and will not easily away. For the odors of ointments are more durable than those of flowers.


http://www.bartleby.com/3/1/53.html
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 3:01:59 PM

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Interesting remark.
thar
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 3:49:21 PM

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This (if it is an accurate transcription) is an interesting snapshot of a language in transition.

This uses the archaic Middle English form for most verbs in the third person singular -
giveth, followeth, beareth, saith, filleth


But then it drops in an alternate form (the one that survives through Early Modern English) -
drowns.

Any reason this doesn't use 'drowneth'? Think Really interested in the reasoning.


And that 'ab' is an 'as', for anybody thinking that was Latin.
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