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Antique Options
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 12:08:00 PM

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TFD

Antique; Dictionary.com

noun
8.
any work of art, piece of furniture, decorative object, or the like, created or produced in a former period, or, according to U.S. customs laws, 100 years before date of purchase.
9.
the antique style, usually Greek or Roman, especially in art.
TFD:
archaic aged or venerable


Synonym of "old"
adj advanced in age

aged
elderly
grays
mature
tired
venerable


Is an old man, an antique?

I am a layman.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 12:38:07 PM

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No.
Was your question intended to be funny?
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:02:18 PM

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Yes, antique can mean "an elderly man or person".



Antique can mean "an elderly man".

Personally I like the word "gaffer".

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:10:43 PM

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No Wilmar sir, T'was not funny. A fact.

I am a layman.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:16:47 PM
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Something that's only 100 years old would not be considered antique in other countries. The Oxford definition is:

"Having a high value because of age and quality." e.g. ‘an antique clock’

Thus the value of an antique lies in its superior quality.

Calling a living person an 'antique' would be considered ill-mannered but, in actual fact, it could be a compliment meaning that, despite their venerable age, the person has some superb and valuable quality.

However the person at whom the word was directed would only concentrate on the age part of it and would probably be very, very hurt.

The phrase we apply to people who are getting older but are extremely valuable to our culture, science,literature etc. is a "National Treasure" - and that's a hugely complimentary and appreciative way of being able to accept that they are ageing, but are very valuable.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 2:10:35 PM

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Elderly though I may be, and old as I am, don't call me an antique!

Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 5:02:54 PM

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Questions aren't "facts".
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:52:53 PM

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FROSTY X RIME wrote:


Antique can mean "an elderly man".

Personally I like the word "gaffer".


Gaffer is also used as a term for the boss, it is quite commonly used when talking about British Association Football club managers.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:34:29 AM

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"Have you not a moist eye, a dry hand, a yellow cheek, a white beard, a decreasing leg, an increasing belly? Is not your voice broken, your wind short, your chin double, your wit single, and every part about you blasted with antiquity?"


William Shakespeare


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:40:15 AM

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NKM wrote:
Elderly though I may be, and old as I am, don't call me an antique!

Better than 'archaic' or 'obsolete'! Whistle

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 1:31:38 PM

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DragO writes;
Better than 'archaic' or 'obsolete'! Whistle

Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 2:16:54 PM
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Guys - especially you, NK - I thought that this http://bit.ly/2mDJ1nc might interest some, on an Antiques thread?

It shows the loving care that goes into their making; the artistry involved;all the things they have to tell us. As well as about how incredibly valuable they are!

(For those who don't know, Lucy Worsley is probably UK's most well-known Academic. She's a historian and her area of special study is the Georgian.Her programmes are really interesting even for people who aren't historians!)
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 4:30:29 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
FROSTY X RIME wrote:


Antique can mean "an elderly man".

Personally I like the word "gaffer".


Gaffer is also used as a term for the boss, it is quite commonly used when talking about British Association Football club managers.



Nice to learn. Thanks.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
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