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I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 2:04:53 AM

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Quotation of the Day

I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)
gerry
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 2:25:57 AM
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As a member of a Political PartyLiar Liar Liar
Ozolinsh V.
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 7:11:51 AM

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Sounds like a challenge.
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 7:42:08 AM
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Daemon wrote:
I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)


Few grand words, like altitude, amplitude, aptitude, attitude - can certainly improve your bombastic capability... Piece of cake - or gateau, if you like.
Joemark
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 10:31:35 AM

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I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.
Jane Austen (1775-1817)
mudbudda669
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:20:55 PM

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?
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 2:33:07 PM

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Context from:Northanger Abbey

Chapter 16

At the end of the first dance, Captain Tilney came towards them again, and, much to Catherine’s dissatisfaction, pulled his brother away. They retired whispering together; and, though her delicate sensibility did not take immediate alarm, and lay it down as fact, that Captain Tilney must have heard some malevolent misrepresentation of her, which he now hastened to communicate to his brother, in the hope of separating them forever, she could not have her partner conveyed from her sight without very uneasy sensations. Her suspense was of full five minutes’ duration; and she was beginning to think it a very long quarter of an hour, when they both returned, and an explanation was given, by Henry’s requesting to know if she thought her friend, Miss Thorpe, would have any objection to dancing, as his brother would be most happy to be introduced to her. Catherine, without hesitation, replied that she was very sure Miss Thorpe did not mean to dance at all. The cruel reply was passed on to the other, and he immediately walked away.

“Your brother will not mind it, I know,” said she, “because I heard him say before that he hated dancing; but it was very good–natured in him to think of it. I suppose he saw Isabella sitting down, and fancied she might wish for a partner; but he is quite mistaken, for she would not dance upon any account in the world.”

Henry smiled, and said, “How very little trouble it can give you to understand the motive of other people’s actions.”

“Why? What do you mean?”

“With you, it is not, How is such a one likely to be influenced, What is the inducement most likely to act upon such a person’s feelings, age, situation, and probable habits of life considered — but, How should I be influenced, What would be my inducement in acting so and so?”

“I do not understand you.”

“Then we are on very unequal terms, for I understand you perfectly well.”

“Me? Yes; I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.

“Bravo! An excellent satire on modern language.”

“But pray tell me what you mean.”

“Shall I indeed? Do you really desire it? But you are not aware of the consequences; it will involve you in a very cruel embarrassment, and certainly bring on a disagreement between us.

“No, no; it shall not do either; I am not afraid.”

“Well, then, I only meant that your attributing my brother’s wish of dancing with Miss Thorpe to good nature alone convinced me of your being superior in good nature yourself to all the rest of the world.”

Read more:http://www.pemberley.com/etext/NA/chapter16.htm
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