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(Vocab) FRIEND or ENEMY? Options
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 8:56:16 AM
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NOT A TEACHER

Dear Fellow Learners:

Here is a portmanteau (two words combined into one word) that may interest you.




Mona and Betty are best friends.

They eat lunch together, study together, visit each other's home, and exchange all kinds of gossip with each other.

But recently Mona has fallen in love with Raul.

Betty has fallen in love with Raul, too.

Mona really wants Raul, so she has been telling lies about Betty.

Betty really wants Raul, so she has been telling lies about Mona.

In your opinion, are Mona and Betty really good friends to each other?

In your opinion, are Mona and Betty really enemies?

Well, maybe you are thinking: They are both friends and enemies.

Thus we get a new word: fr[iend]enemy.


The other day I read a newspaper headline that referred to two nations that had changed from "friends" to "frenemies."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 9:10:39 AM

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Hmmm . . . Think

I'd say that if they have been telling lies about each other, they are both unprincipled, contemptible miscreants. Shame on you Shame on you

And Raul would be a lot better-off with Rachael.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 9:53:06 AM

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Nations may be frenemies but

Mona and Betty both are frincheats.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
taurine
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 10:19:40 AM

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Goofy Comics no. 2 published in 1943 uses simple method of identification: Friend or Foe. According to the Aircraft Spotters' Handbook, any youngster can instantly identify Friend or Foe using certain flash identification.
I think that it may still be relevant to the contemporary identification problems, instead of usage of a neologism in the form of frenemy. It also could help direct an attention toward more loyal relationship.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 10:25:31 AM

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Talking about ice-hockey,
Finland and Sweden are the best enemies to each other, so are USA and Canada.

In Finnish we say "rakastettu vihollinen", beloved enemy. That is archrivalry.

In IICWC games, Finns and Swedes tend to meet before their teams' match, take some beer, brag a little, and after the game
boast a little more, depending on who won. All this in fully friendship.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 10:45:28 AM
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I agree with you both.

However, at least from over here, I've only ever seen the word employed in political headlines.

I couldn't see it taking off in the general population where friend or foe has different connotations - from gang-warfare, to office politics. Mona and Betty, as Drago says,are both 'contemptable'; one can't see a 'friend' context there at all.

Politically though, where diplomacy and publicity rule, I can see how/why it has been coined by busy journalists who don't put much thought behind space-saving neologisms.

However, like Taurine, I too think a word usage that seems to normalise disloyalty can be bettered.
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 11:31:36 AM

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Portmanteaus are always a cool thing.

For those who've never heard the word Portmanteau, it means the combination of two words to make a third related word.

@Romany, hmm, I actually saw it first in terms of celebrity relationships. It's the sort of thing I try to block from my news feeds etc., but I can't, even though I use site blocker aggressively.

Examples would be Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie, who filmed a "reality" show and then fell apart.

Selena Gomez and Demi Lovato, two former teen pop singers/actresses, also fall in the same boat.

Sarah Jessica Parker and Kim Cattrall, stars of Sex and the City, also fall in this category.

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 11:41:31 AM

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But surely portmanteau is a portmanteau.

Is that fractal vocabulary? d'oh!

Must agree, they are not frenemies - just nasty people. Luckily Raul sees this and is cheating on both of them with Sylvie. Whistle
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 12:44:42 PM
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Thanks to DragOnspeaker, Mr. Joshi, Taurine, Mr. Schultz, and Thar for their informative and humorous comments.

Yes, Raul would be better off with neither!



Have a nice day!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:02:54 PM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Thanks, TheParser for being so nice.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:27:03 PM
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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
Thanks, TheParser for being so nice.


It is I who thank you for being so nice.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 6:11:42 PM

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fren·e·my = A person who is ostensibly friendly or collegial with someone but who is actually antagonistic or competitive.
TheParser
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 7:50:00 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
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Wilmar (USA) wrote:
fren·e·my = A person who is ostensibly friendly or collegial with someone but who is actually antagonistic or competitive.



Thank you.
Romany
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 6:40:46 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Yeah, thanks Wilmar.

Now I understand it better. Being 'ostensibly' friendly or 'collegial' is often necessary in a work environment in order to preserve the smooth running of the environment. But those kinds of relationships are not real 'friendships'. So that underneath, feelings of competitiveness or even antagonism are not tempered by any real relationship? So that, in both cases the words 'friend' and 'enemy' are exaggerated: they are friendly but not friends, and competitors not enemies?

Is that more the way it's used? (As I said, have never actually heard it said?)

Andrew: - I'm sorry; but I'm totally ignorant when it comes to movie/tv stars. But I'm guessing it's the same sort of thing? They have to smile for the cameras and the publicity; but they're still competitors? They aren't actually friends at all and they aren't actual 'enemies', but they're rivals?
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