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Inch or Inches? Options
Chandrasekhar Krishnan
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 9:34:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2015
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Location: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Recently, I read a book where a person was partly described thus:

He was Six feet one inches tall.

Is the sentence correct?

Or should it be "He was six feet one inch tall" as one is singular.

Please note the use of plural feet in "six feet".

Would like to know expert's comment on this.

Regards

C K
TMe
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 10:29:12 AM

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He was Six feet one inches tall.

It should have been "He was six-feet-one-inches tall." IMO


Deliberate practice of one hour is worth ten hours of normal practice.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 12:14:36 PM

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Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Not an expert.

In my area we would just say, "He's six foot one." "She's five foot eight".

We know it is in inches and we know it is height so we don't bother to say that and that solves the problem of it usually being plural but one is not. Or if answering a question about height, just "six-two", five-eight" would do.

"He is six feet/foot one inch" is probably what I would say. Six foot two inches. It is a controversial question and probably very location specific as to what is customary there, but I would go with making the one inch singular. Since two to eleven inches are used more often, I can understand why the plural might be used more as an idiom even with it being only one inch.

Most countries are metric now so you may not get too many opinions on this.

Sometimes the longest way around is the shortest way home. Anon
will
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:08:22 PM
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Hope123 wrote:
In my area we would just say...

Where I come from we’d say 1.85m… it’s not the 19th century.

Whistle

.
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:34:53 PM

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland, United States
One fathom... the present time might well be identified as the 28th century (A.U.C.)

cf pretentious non sequitur
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:55:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
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Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
will wrote:
Hope123 wrote:
In my area we would just say...

Where I come from we’d say 1.85m… it’s not the 19th century.

Whistle

.


Lol.

Stick it in your ear, Will. Whistle

(Canada is metric - I go kicking and screaming.)

Sometimes the longest way around is the shortest way home. Anon
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 2:35:59 PM

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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Hope123 wrote:
Canada is metric.

Not exactly! Food stores have prices per pound (with per kg in small font). I worked in a metal shop - we had all sizes in feet and inches. In Real Estate all sizes are given in feet and square feet.

tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 3:54:34 PM

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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
The UK has been going metric for over fifty years (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_Kingdom)
We can still buy pints of milk and beer, and our distances/speed limits on the roads are still given in miles/mph, so it may well be another fifty years before we finally succumb.

I have heard that Australians completed their metrication programme in less than twenty years. This clearly shows the superiority of the British. Unlike our former colonies, we take our time in a mature fashion; we don't rush into things.


Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 3:59:36 PM

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Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Canada became officially metric in 1970 under our current Prime Minister's father, Pierre Trudeau. For official purposes, all measurements are in metric.

At that time it was assumed that the US would go metric to keep up with the rest of the world, but they didn't. I think it was Reagan who said no.

Anybody born after mid sixties does not know what the old Imperial system is - which we had because of ties to the UK. Most stores did both for a while for us old fogies.

Some stores around here have discontinued using both. At least the ones I frequent have. Some may still. Especially border places and out west.

Doctors measure weight and height and cholesterol in metric. Cars are in metric with a changeable guide for traveling in the US, thermometers and tape measures, and road signs are in metric etc Most people talk temperature in celsius. Real estate does still display Imperial measures in ads.

Even the older generation has an idea of the values. I usually think in one and translate to the other. Those who were taught metric to begin with have no problem. All teachers had to learn it but we don't forget the old method either.

I read somewhere a tongue-in-cheek statement - "Real Canadian liberals use metric. lol



Sometimes the longest way around is the shortest way home. Anon
NKM
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 3:59:56 PM

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I disagree with Hope only about the idea that there's anything controversial about "six feet one inch."

Yes, we'd normally just say "six feet one" or (idiomatically) "six foot one." There's nothing wrong with specifying "one inch," but "one inches" sounds blatantly wrong to the native ear.

Hope123
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 4:13:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 5,345
Neurons: 32,896
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
I agree NKM. It sounds wrong to me too. I edited and added that after I saw it being questioned online. Perhaps they got their idea from an error in literature or from a chart.


Sometimes the longest way around is the shortest way home. Anon
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