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by hell or high water Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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by hell or high water

By any means necessary; regardless of any difficulty, problem, or obstacle. More...

thar
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 1:55:25 AM

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Not by, surely. It is not the method. You don't do something by high water!

- it is what may happen to obstruct you - come hell or high water.

I find so many of these idioms are 'off' just a little bit - it is so strange.
Some are the American version, that makes sense (although I didn't realise they varied) but some just seem weird. Think

By hook or by crook - that is a way of expressing the means.
Not 'by hell or high water'.

Agree, disagree?

taurine
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 3:42:12 AM

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But what about a wedding in the version the expression proposed is: By hook or by crook?
taurine
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 3:42:13 AM

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progpen
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 8:37:15 AM

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Come hell or high water is the only way I've ever heard it or used it myself.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 10:20:02 AM

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The first citation of the phrase in print in the Oxford English Dictionary is only from 1915, although, as is often the case with folk sayings, it was probably in oral use for quite a while before that date.

The logic of “come hell or high water” meaning “despite any obstacle” is a bit unclear. The “high water” most likely refers to flooding of a community by a swollen river, which could, at a minimum, make appointments difficult to keep. But it has also been suggested that the phrase came from the days of cattle drives in the western US, when fording a river at “high water” was a risky proposition. In any case, the “twist” of the phrase comes from the counterposition of “hell,” the locus of absolute evil, with the fairly mundane (and mild by comparison) inconvenience of “high water.”

A similar phrase from the southern US is “Lord willing and the creek don’t rise,” meaning essentially “if all goes well; barring any disaster.” The origin of this phrase would seem to be obviously tied to flooding from a “creek,” a small stream, but evidently there are people out there who believe that the reference is actually to the Creek Indian Nation (making that part of the phrase equivalent to “and if the Indians don’t rise up and attack us”). That theory is, I suppose, not absolutely impossible, but it is unlikely enough that a few years ago a participant on the American Dialect Society mailing list was moved to puckishly ask whether the original form of “come hell or high water” might, in that light, have been “come hell or Hiawatha.”



http://www.word-detective.com/2008/02/hell-or-high-water/
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 10:23:14 AM

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dave argo
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 3:43:41 PM

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Daemon wrote:
by hell or high water

By any means necessary; regardless of any difficulty, problem, or obstacle. More...



Come hell or hight water, by all means, not just any means necessary. And hold breath.Pray
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 4:08:11 PM
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Daemon wrote:
by hell or high water

By any means necessary; regardless of any difficulty, problem, or obstacle. More...

By hell or high water come also the undesired consequences of hellfire and floodwater.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 4:32:16 PM

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Well, if you have both together, they would tend to cancel each other out, wouldn't they?

The water disappears down the pits of hell, and also puts of the fires. So you are just left in hot water.

Or with a nice hot bath. Depends on your attitude, I suspect. Think
Rick Ak
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 5:25:10 PM

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By hell or high water, come rain or shine!
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