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Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Options
hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2017 8:46:47 PM

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Interesting Facts of The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Washington, DC

1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the tomb of the Unknowns and why?

21 steps: It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignitary.

2. How long does he hesitate after his about face to begin his return walk and why?
21 seconds: For the same reason as answer number 1

3. Why are his gloves wet?
His gloves are moistened to prevent his losing his grip on the rifle.

4. Does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time and, if not, why not?
He carries the rifle on the shoulder away from the tomb. After his march across the path, he executes an about face and moves the rifle to the outside shoulder.

5. How often are the guards changed?
Guards are changed every thirty minutes, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.

6. What are the physical traits of the guard limited to?
For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5' 10' and 6' 2' tall and his waist size cannot exceed 30.
They must commit 2 years of life to guard the tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on or off duty for the rest of their lives.


They cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives and cannot disgrace the uniform or the tomb in any way.

After two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as guard of the tomb.

There are only 400 presently sworn.

The guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin.

The shoes are specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal heel plates that extend to the top of the shoe in order to make the loud click as they come to a halt. There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror.

The first six months of duty a guard cannot talk to anyone nor watch TV. All off duty time is spent studying the 175 notable people laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery.

A guard must memorize who they are and where they are interred. Among the notables are: President Taft, Joe Lewis {the boxer}, Medal of Honor winner Audie L. Murphy, the most decorated soldier of WWII and of Hollywood fame.

Every guard spends five hours a day getting his uniforms ready for guard duty.

In 2003 as Hurricane Isabelle was approaching Washington, DC, our US Senate/House took 2 days off with anticipation of the storm. On the ABC evening news, it was reported that because of the dangers from the hurricane, the military members assigned the duty of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were given permission to suspend the assignment. They respectfully declined the offer, "No way, Sir!" Soaked to the skin, marching in the pelting rain of a tropical storm, they said that guarding the Tomb was not just an assignment, it was the highest honor that can be afforded to a service person. The tomb has been patrolled continuously, 24/7, since 1930.

If you've ever wondered what a 21 gun salute was....these are the reasons.
Be blessed, and remember our Veterans
hedy



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2017 10:07:53 PM
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hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2017 10:29:23 PM

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Thank you almo 1 for the awesome photo...I've been to Arlington Cemetery in Washington, D.C. ....my dad and husband who transitioned 3 yrs ago, were veterans...my brother in law is also a veteran who did 3 tours in Vietnam, he flew the Iron Wolf.....
hedy

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
TMe
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 4:51:20 AM

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I salute. Well founded research...hedy....accolades

I am a layman.
Annelise Carlsen
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 5:20:19 AM

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A lot of this is, alas, not true: https://tombguard.org/society/faq/
TheParser
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 7:55:50 AM
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The best way to honor the memory of the Unknown Soldier (and his sacrifice) is for all people living in the United States (citizens and non-citizens) to show proper respect to all our elected officials.
Romany
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 9:16:20 AM
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Guys - PLEASE, this is the Literature thread. Can we please keep it for the discussion of Literature?

And can we PLEASE also confine edgy political/patriot comments to the Politics section. We are living in strange times and for many of us these threads are an ESCAPE from all that drama.Give us a break.

Forum regulations are easily referred, on the Main Menu.

hedy mmm
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 10:46:52 AM

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TMe wrote:
I salute. Well founded research...hedy...accolades

TheParser wrote:

The best way to honor the memory of the Unknown Soldier (and his sacrifice) is for all people living in the United States (citizens and non-citizens) to show proper respect to all our elected officials.


hedy mmm responded:
Yes, I do my research TMe...you say few words...not lengthly, nonsensical discourse (you are a breath of fresh air).

As always, TheParser, a succinct statement; "the best way to honor the memory of the Unknown Soldier (and his sacrifice) is for all people living in the United States (citizens and non-citizens) to show proper respect to all our elected officials", and I will add......ignore the bêtise of TFD who add their 2¢ because they have too much time on their hands and too little mind to actually respect other threads ....

thank you almo 1....your picture says a thousand words.... I say "GOD BLESS AMERICA, LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE".

hedy Applause Applause Applause Applause

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 11:10:42 AM

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Romany, please explain the word "strange times". Nothing looks strange to us.

Confining 'patriotic' comments to political section will be the ultimate and paramount disgrace, infamy and opprobrium to the supreme sacrifice of the soldiers who died for their country without compassion for their families. I am sorry.
If the pious history of a race, country or people is not Literature, then I call upon the literateurs to change the definition of 'Literature'.

Please read

Unselfishly, you left your fathers and your mothers,
You left behind your sisters and your brothers.
Leaving your beloved children and wives,
You put on hold, your dreams-your lives.
On foreign soil, you found yourself planted
To fight for those whose freedom you granted.
Without your sacrifice, their cause would be lost
But you carried onward, no matter the cost.

Many horrors you had endured and seen.
Many faces had haunted your dreams.
You cheered as your enemies littered the ground;
You cried as your brothers fell all around.

When it was over, you all came back home,
Some were left with memories to face all alone;
Some found themselves in the company of friends
As their crosses cast shadows across the land.

Those who survived were forever scarred
Emotionally, physically, permanently marred.
Those who did not now sleep eternally
'Neath the ground they had given their lives to keep free.

With a hand upon my heart, I feel The pride and respect; my reverence is revealed
In the tears that now stream down my upturned face
As our flag waves above you, in her glory and grace.
Freedom was the gift that you unselfishly gave
Pain and death was the price that you ultimately paid.
Every day, I give my utmost admiration
To those who had fought to defend our nation.
~ Author Unknown ~

(Posting, for the sake of posting sans any logic, is deprecable)




Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 2:53:53 PM
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Ashwin - you misunderstood, my friend. By all means, let us talk of poetry and some of the magnificent corpus of literature, and stirring speeches which have come down to us from as far back as the earliest literature.

However, until your contribution, nothing at all pertained to Literature and the thread was starting to go in another direction!

I'm assumming you know the story of the Unknown Soldier? Even while WW1 was still going on, French and English Military had agreed, after the Battle of the Somme, that they bury one man who was unidentifiable, in a commemorative tomb. No-one would know whose mother's son it was: a weeping Italian's, a distraught German's, a mother from far away Australia, or a lonely mother from India.

The purpose was to pay homage to all the young people who marched off to war and never came back. The first Unknown Soldiers still lie in Westminster Cathedral and under the Arc de Triomphe,where they were entombed with great ceremony in 1920, and where millions visit them each year. Portugal, America and Italy all followed suite the next year. By now most countries have adopted this custom which is non-partisan, non-nationalistic, and non-political: it honours all equally. I don't remember ever seeing any war=graves in India, tho' I'm sure that's only because I was a child. And I'm sure you must have a Tomb to the Unknown Soldier of course. Where is it?

This is a poem we were all taught to say in Australia - it's one that's said on Remembrance Day at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

In Flanders fields.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

John McCrae (1872–1918)
p.s. Because of this poem, the first time I really DID see poppies growing in fields in Flanders I cried and cried.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 3:16:53 PM
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“I assure those of you who fought and died for your country that your names will live forever at this shrine in Musashino” – Emperor Meiji.

In 1869, after the Boshin Civil War, Emperor Meiji established the Yasukuni Shrine, meaning “Peaceful Nation," as a way to honor and remember those who died in service to the (Emperor’s) country. In this sense, specifically with how this shrine began and who was chosen to be enshrined at the premises, some Japanese feel Yasukuni holds the same standing as the United States’ Arlington Cemetery, Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s estate, which was confiscated during the Civil War by the North to bury Union Soldiers who fell in battle.

Walking through the torii (gates) towards the shrine, you will feel the somberness. At the Chumon Torii just before the main prayer hall, there is a display that contains a different “last letter” every month, written by someone who has died from a war. These letters are generally filled with regret and sincere apologies for failing to live up to their familial duties – not a declaration of victory over a fallen foe or hateful words regarding an enemy.

But this is not how the news portrays the shrine to its readers. Instead, one normally reads a description that casts the Yasukuni Shrine as one that honors (14 Class A; and about 1,000 Class B and Class C) war criminals. In the United States, this would be on par with the hypothetical headline: “an official visit was made to Arlington Cemetery, a burial ground that honors 30,000 traitors (Confederates) who rebelled against the United States to keep African Americans as slaves." Why would anyone want to honor slavers and traitors, right?

Yasukuni Shrine does not honor the actions of Class A War Criminals. People who pray or provide offerings at the shrine do not honor the actions of war criminals. Notwithstanding the enshrinement process, where the Shinto priests claim that it cleanses the spirit of all wrong deeds (similar to being “forgiven by Jesus/God/Priests” in the Christian belief system), people go to the shrine to pray for the wellbeing of their departed family members, compatriots, or to thank those that died for their service. Again, they do not go there to worship the heinous acts of previous wars.

Whether Japanese politicians should or should not give homage at the shrine is a personal choice. Japan, like many other free, democratic countries prescribes to the right of ‘Freedom of Religion.’ No one is forced to worship at the shrine, so why would people (or countries) try to forbid or criticize those who exercise their right to pray at the shrine? Should the Turkish people, believers of Islam, or other 'infidel groups' who suffered as victims during the Crusades, then be allowed to demand people stay away from the Vatican because of its prior atrocities? The answer is no – because modern day people don’t praise the actions of these horrible crimes that occurred in the past. However, people may still pray to someone that had a major role in the unfortunate Crusades, like Saint Louis IX (canonized in 1297).

I will concede there may be reason for controversy surrounding the Yuushuukan, the Military and War Museum located on Yasukuni and ran by employees of the shrine. Having visited this museum twice; watched the movies and perused the exhibits; studied Northeast Asian History; and visited Nanjing’s Massacre Memorial Hall, I can understand why some people and cultures may disagree with the historical accuracy of the information and the presentation of the material at this museum. However, it is the curator’s choice and the desired message he wants to convey. Just as it is the choice of millions of Americans, when they sit down at Thanksgiving and give “thanks” aimed at the compassion of strangers, a fruitful harvest, and/or a wonderful year, while displaying cornucopias and reenacting Native Americans offering food to the European Settlers. Although in contrast, other groups like the Native Americans may choose not to celebrate this holiday because it represents the beginning of an invasion, full of mass genocide led by brutal conquerors from foreign lands.

Everyone is taught history differently and no one wants to remember the bad times. History always depends on who lived it, who wrote it, and who has read it. If someone has the desire, an accurate summation of the truth, not just the truths assumed by the victors, can easily be found. The Japanese, like other cultures, are honoring those who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. In a multi-cultural, multi-national world, we need to embrace these differences – and accept there are multiple sides to every story. Because if we only accept our own country's history as fact, I fear we will never be able to understand or appreciate our neighbors for the betterment of mankind.

By Christopher K. Kuchma


The serenity of Yasukuni


tunaafi
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 3:32:18 PM

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TheParser wrote:
The best way to honor the memory of the Unknown Soldier (and his sacrifice) is for all people living in the United States (citizens and non-citizens) to show proper respect to all our elected officials.

The grandson of two men who served their country in both world wars, the son of a man who served in the second and in Korea, I am also a veteran (admittedly one who was never called to serve in combat). I travel to England every year to parade with old comrades at the Remembrance Day service in the home city of our unit.

I do not see any connection between showing respect for the fallen and showing respect to all elected officials. There are, in probably every country in the world, elected officials who do not deserve the respect of anybody. We show more respect to the memory of those who died for freedom if we maintain a vigilant fight against all who threaten freedom.

The best way to honour the memory of the fallen is not to respect the corrupt and dishonest (as some of our elected officials are), but to do our best to to work for peace in the world so that no more need fall.
tunaafi
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 5:11:42 PM

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As this is in the Literature forum, I will add here Laurence Binyon's 'For the Fallen'

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.


They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England's foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain;
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.


Not great poetry perhaps, but written in 1914 when the number of casualties from the fighting in France was already becoming distressingly high, it struck a chord with servicemen and their family. Some, or all of it is recited at Remembrance Day services in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and at Commonwealth graveyards throughout the world. The stanza I have put in bold front is part of the British Remembrance Day service,
L.Rai
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 6:25:33 PM

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Hedy:

Thanks for the facts. This may not have been the "right" thread for this post...however, if anyone was offended by it being placed wrong...the simple action of moving it should have been considered. Since it wasn't moved..get over it. The sentiments expressed were done to make us think about self-sacrifice, maybe it's time we all gave a little thought to that word. If we would all consider what it that means maybe our world would become a reflection of people learning to serve others, not just being self-serving.

Kudos for reminding us to be servants first. Applause

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
Dreamy
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 7:53:44 PM

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On the subject of war and graves:

Michael Coldham-Fussell wrote:
Sensing wicked versus virtuous again and again,
Crying right against wrong someone needs to explain.

Telling much the same story on page after page,
Aging war graves weep while insane battles rage.

Tyrants obsessing crave glory their own,
Dictators reigning with hearts made of stone,
Terror fomenting from Satan's mad throne,
Destiny reaping whatever is sown.

[From a larger work called "Man Of Tyranny".]

Job 33:15 "In a dream, in a vision of the night, When deep sleep falls upon men, In slumberings upon the bed;" Theology 101 "If He doesn't know everything then He isn't God."
Hope123
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 9:32:46 PM

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Thank you, Hedy. Yes, we should remember and not just on Remembrance Day or Veterans' Day - so we can try to prevent future conflicts.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Tomb_of_the_Unknown_Soldier

In 2000, Canada added the Unknown Soldier to the National War Memorial. He was taken from a grave near Vimy Ridge where Canadians were buried in WWI.


"The tomb is intended to honour the approximately 116,000 Canadians who died in combat, as well as all members of the Canadian Armed Forces—in all branches—who died or may die in all conflicts, past, present, and future.

...The original headstone of the unknown soldier is the sole artifact and the focal point of Memorial Hall in the Canadian War Museum. The hall was designed in such a way that sunlight will only frame the headstone once each year on the 11th of November at 11:00 am.

...On October 22, 2014, a gunman armed with a rifle shot at the sentries on duty at the tomb, fatally wounding Corporal Nathan Cirillo of The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise's), before proceeding across the street and into the Centre Block on nearby Parliament Hill. There, the gunman was killed in a firefight by then Sergeant-at-Arms of the House of Commons, Kevin Vickers.[10]



Dreamy, Applause Applause Applause

And thanks to those who posted the stirring poems and prose!
Romany, I believe McCrae was Canadian. (Just blowing my own horn.)

"Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD was a Canadian poet, physician, author, artist and soldier during World War I, and a surgeon during the Second Battle of Ypres, in Belgium."




Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 9:38:36 PM

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World War I casualties by country chart...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I_casualties

World War II casualties by country chart...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_casualties

List of wars by death toll...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars_by_death_toll

Pretty depressing, this side of humankind... we can't seem to make love like the Bonobos instead of war.




Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 10:00:39 PM

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Literature - a poem from those left without their loved one. And with a new worry...



I remember seeing the movie " A Bridge Too Far" with its chilling ending of boys playing with their toy guns. The poem reminded me of it.

"A Bridge Too Far is a 1977 British-American epic war film based on the 1974 book of the same name by Cornelius Ryan, adapted by William Goldman."


Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 4:29:08 AM

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Väinö Linna: Tuntematon sotilas (The Unknown Soldier), a novel published in 1954, the English translation in 1957.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/422728.The_Unknown_Soldier

A must read to every Finn and a good read to the others ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 4:39:50 AM
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Mr. Kuchma's article was very eloquent.

Thanks.

It definitely did influence my thinking about the matter.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 4:56:15 AM
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Yesterday was Presidents Day in the United States.

Some people spoiled (and soiled) that day by holding "Not My President Day" demonstrations.

Some of those people were admittedly even people who do not have permission to be here!

We should always show respect for the office of every elected official.

If a person does not support the policies of the Honorable Donald J. Trump, the President of the United States of America, s/he should work in an orderly manner to oppose those policies in accordance with civilized norms.

The behavior of many opponents of the President is disgraceful and disgusting. Here in the States, many Congressmen/women return to their home districts to hold meetings with their constituents. Thuggish opponents of the President have not allowed some Congressmen/women to even speak. Some of those thugs have invaded the Congressmen/women's local offices and prevented the daily business of the office to take place.

Of course, the media have not shown this. The media are staffed mostly by college-educated "liberals" who are completely out of touch with the lives lived by the majority of Americans.
Right this minute, some journalists are dreaming of another Watergate -- and fame for themselves.


*****

Keep up the great work, Hedy:

Remember that wise proverb: The dogs bark, but the caravan moves on.
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 5:42:49 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Yesterday was Presidents Day in the United States.

Some people spoiled (and soiled) that day by holding "Not My President Day" demonstrations.


And you are spoiling and soiling this thread by bringing politics into the Literature forum.

The qualities, or lack of them of President Trump and/or his opponents are in no way related to poems honouring the dead. Show some respect for the poems, the poets, and the people they are honouring by keeping political posts in the Politics forum.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 8:56:01 AM
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hedy mmm wrote:
ignore the bêtise of TFD who add their 2¢ because they have too much time on their hands.



Great advice.


Thanks.
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 6:50:05 PM

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A little different viewpoint about "The Glorious Dead" by Tony Jolley. Does he have a point?


The cenotaph sighs
Under weight of the words:
A marble-white marker
Bridging two worlds.

To the Living, still searching
For meaning in mourning,
It’s the solace and strength
To survive through ‘til morning.
Finding glory in death
Not some future foregone
But a timeless, selfless triumph
Over power of gun.

But for the Lost it was nothing but slaughter:
Meat and blood upon the block,
Murdered to Hell or to Heaven
With the rest of that pitiful flock.

The cenotaph cries,
Tries to make itself transparent
So the Living will learn from the Lost, at last,
The lesson all too apparent,

That our glory lies only in life as it’s lived -
Never in death and the dying.

The cenotaph knows the truth:
Its very own legend is lying.



..... ‘The Glorious Dead’ is the most prominent phrase emblazoned upon the London Cenotaph.....

Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 8:48:28 PM

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He does, but I think Wilfred Owen said it better, based on his own experiences in the trenches.

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.

Wilfred died in action on the 4th of November 1918 just a week before the war ended.
Dulce er decorum est Pro patria mori is a famous quotation from a Roman writer.
It means ' It is sweet and honourable to die for your country'.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 4:32:15 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Sarrie - Wilfred Owen is my go-to for WW1 poetry; as Kenneth Slessor is for WW2.

I know it's an unpopular theory on TFD - but, especially coming from an Air Force family, I don't glorify war. Also, with a mother who nursed troops and has a wealth of stories of broken men, and the pain and indignity and horrific loss of the young and all their potential. I always remember her telling me how, all through the nights there would be grown men screaming aloud for their mothers.

Wilfred Owen found nothing 'sweet' about war, but endeavoured to bring it: the fear, the boredom, the occasional black humour,the filth, the horror. He wanted all the people who went round distributing white feathers or who encouraged warfare to understand what it meant.

I often wonder, had he survived, what would have been his fate? Would he have been lauded as a modern poet and writer? Would he have been slammed and derided? Would he ever have adapted to Civie life again? Useless questions...but he has been 'alive' to me since I first eased a book of my parents off the shelf and discovered him there.
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 7:03:20 AM

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Romany wrote:
I know it's an unpopular theory on TFD - but, especially coming from an Air Force family, I don't glorify war.


I don't think there's anyone here who glorifies war.
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 9:02:04 AM

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Not here, Tuna, but they call them "The Glorious Dead" and that becomes confused with "glorious war" sometimes and they are two different things.

As when a war is glorious because it is religious. Or when movies make it seem to be so instead if showing the reality of it. And unless you've been in the military, most of us used to get our ideas about war from movies. Nowadays we can see the horror with videos of children being pulled from a collapsed building.

Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 9:33:30 AM

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No poems, but a beautiful song written in the 1960s.

The story behind it is of a village in which the men used to dance (Morris Dancing) on Whit Sunday (seven weeks after Easter). During the First World War, most of the men were killed, so the girls and ladies continued the tradition as a memorial.

The Ladies Go Dancing at Whitsun.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 10:41:50 AM

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Thank you, Drago! It is beautiful.

Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 11:41:08 AM

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With all fairness, my GF told me that female sex organ is termed as 'Tomb of Unknown Soldiers' because , after intercourse,out of millions of sperms shed, only one sperm enters the female ovum after a great struggle, the rest, in millions, vanish,hence "Tomb of Unknown Soldiers". Please comments.


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
mactoria
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 12:28:55 AM
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Annelise Carlsen wrote:
A lot of this is, alas, not true: https://tombguard.org/society/faq/


Since most ignored your comment pointing out that Hedy's information was not totally correct, including some commenters who praised her for it even after you posted that some of the info was erroneous, I'm adding this comment underscoring that your link has the true story of the Tomb of the Unknowns (as it's actually known now) and the procedures that govern those sentries who guard it. Truth is always important; repeating incorrect or flawed stories in this case is not only wrong, in some ways it does dishonor to the "Unknowns" and those sentries who dedicate a piece of their military lives to guarding this national monument.

In this same vein, people who chose to demonstrate peacefully, saying what they felt or believed regardless of how unpopular it might be, are simply using the free speech rights the US was founded on and which are contained in our Constitution...the Constitution that the Unknowns and millions of other men and women fought for in numerous wars and peace-keeping actions since the Revolutionary War. Which people who know American history should remember followed protests of laws and leaders they disagreed with, including the Boston Tea Party (an act of civil disobedience actually, not just a simple exercise of free speech). When people stop voicing their opinions, speaking their truth to their elected leaders ("their truth" which might not be everyone else's truth or the "truth" desired by elected or appointed officials), then the American democracy will have died and the Unknowns and every other soldier would have given their last measure in vain. American democracy is not neat or tidy, when Americans are engaged and active, our democracy can be loud, messy, and annoying to some fellow citizens. Learning to accept that the umbrella of American democracy covers a panoply of opinions held by equals is the responsibility of all citizens.

Since this is under the "Literature" section, suggest readers read: the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution including the Preamble, the Federalist Papers, any of a number of excellent biographies of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, etc.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, March 04, 2017 5:02:05 PM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 6,939
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Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
mactoria wrote:
Annelise Carlsen wrote:
A lot of this is, alas, not true: https://tombguard.org/society/faq/


Since most ignored your comment pointing out that Hedy's information was not totally correct, including some commenters who praised her for it even after you posted that some of the info was erroneous, I'm adding this comment underscoring that your link has the true story of the Tomb of the Unknowns (as it's actually known now) and the procedures that govern those sentries who guard it. Truth is always important; repeating incorrect or flawed stories in this case is not only wrong, in some ways it does dishonor to the "Unknowns" and those sentries who dedicate a piece of their military lives to guarding this national monument.

In this same vein, people who chose to demonstrate peacefully, saying what they felt or believed regardless of how unpopular it might be, are simply using the free speech rights the US was founded on and which are contained in our Constitution...the Constitution that the Unknowns and millions of other men and women fought for in numerous wars and peace-keeping actions since the Revolutionary War. Which people who know American history should remember followed protests of laws and leaders they disagreed with, including the Boston Tea Party (an act of civil disobedience actually, not just a simple exercise of free speech). When people stop voicing their opinions, speaking their truth to their elected leaders ("their truth" which might not be everyone else's truth or the "truth" desired by elected or appointed officials), then the American democracy will have died and the Unknowns and every other soldier would have given their last measure in vain. American democracy is not neat or tidy, when Americans are engaged and active, our democracy can be loud, messy, and annoying to some fellow citizens. Learning to accept that the umbrella of American democracy covers a panoply of opinions held by equals is the responsibility of all citizens.

Since this is under the "Literature" section, suggest readers read: the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution including the Preamble, the Federalist Papers, any of a number of excellent biographies of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, etc.


Thanks to both of you!

Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
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