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Kunstniete
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 3:37:38 AM

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Hi everyone,

english words which are transfered to the german language are called anglicisms. Is there any term for the other way round, for words like Kindergarten, Festschrift etc.? Think
And do you know other words which are adopted to the english language without any change in spelling / writing?
Thank you very much Angel
J-P
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 3:51:08 AM

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blitzkrieg
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 4:02:42 AM

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I think the word would be 'Germanicisation', but it's not easy to pronounce!

Schadenfreude is an example. There really IS no English word to mean that.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 4:33:00 AM

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TFD:


Germanisation
(also spelt Germanization) refers to the spread of the German language, people and culture or policies which may have introduced these changes. It was a central plank of German liberal thinking in the 19th and 20th centuries, at a period when liberalism and nationalism went hand-in-hand. In linguistics, Germanisation also occurs when a word from the German language is adapted into a foreign language.



Germanism, Germanicism

a German loanword in English, as gemütlich. Also called Teutonism, Teutonicism.


Generally the latter term is used in cultural, historical, racial, and political matters. You know those "blonde hair and blue eyes" theories ;-)



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Kunstniete
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 4:47:23 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
TFD:


Germanisation
(also spelt Germanization) refers to the spread of the German language, people and culture or policies which may have introduced these changes. It was a central plank of German liberal thinking in the 19th and 20th centuries, at a period when liberalism and nationalism went hand-in-hand. In linguistics, Germanisation also occurs when a word from the German language is adapted into a foreign language.



Germanism, Germanicism

a German loanword in English, as gemütlich. Also called Teutonism, Teutonicism.


Generally the latter term is used in cultural, historical, racial, and political matters. You know those "blonde hair and blue eyes" theories ;-)



Thanks a lot for that explanation Applause Although I really wonder how foreigner pronounce gemütlich, since most people who are not familiar with german have problems with umlauts (ä,ü,ö). Btw, Umlaut is also a Germanism Dancing
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 4:55:24 AM

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Kunstniete wrote:
Although I really wonder how foreigner pronounce gemütlich, since most people who are not familiar with german have problems with umlauts (ä,ü,ö).

This page has an audio:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/gem%c3%bctlich
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 5:17:27 AM
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In Japan, some people lernen Deutsch watching TV.




Japanese learn German Weinproben meisterschaft






coag
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 5:21:03 AM

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Zeitgeist
Gestalt (Gestalt therapy)
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 6:18:33 AM

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Lager und schnapps ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
J-P
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 8:21:45 AM

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Gestalt
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 8:40:43 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Lager und schnapps ;-)

Ah - well then -
Lowenbrau
Heineken
Kirsch

***********
Kunstniete wrote:
Although I really wonder how foreigner pronounce gemütlich

That's easy! What's a few dots here and there?

It's 'ge' like the last syllable in 'anger'
'mut' like 'mutt' in 'mutter'
'lich' like 'lick'

ger-mutt-lick

Simples! Whistle Whistle

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:04:42 AM

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Not a word, but that Diesel guy got pretty famous. Whistle


Quite a few in geology - you can imagine how Lagerstätte gets mangled in English. American pronunciation seems to ignore the umlaut. Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:13:30 AM

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thar wrote:
American pronunciation seems to ignore the umlaut. Whistle

Don't tell the Germans, but it's really a diaeresis - and it's meant to be put over the second of a pair of vowels if you want them pronounced separately.

Like Chloë is pronounced /kloʊ-e/
Chloe would be just /kloʊ/

Putting one over a single vowel is silly . . .

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Kunstniete
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:21:57 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
thar wrote:
American pronunciation seems to ignore the umlaut. Whistle

Don't tell the Germans, but it's really a diaeresis - and it's meant to be put over the second of a pair of vowels if you want them pronounced separately.

Like Chloë is pronounced /kloʊ-e/
Chloe would be just /kloʊ/

Putting one over a single vowel is silly . . .


Of course you can also use ae/ue/oe instead of ä/ü/ö, but it looks really confusing. But you're right, this german Umlaut-thing complicates different aspects (i.e. thinking of links here)...Think
thar
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:22:13 AM

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Wasn't it another printing shortcut that dropped the second vowel and used the diaeresis?
I think I read that somewhere? Probably here!

But isn't it a sound change, in effect? Not two separate vowels? Sorry, off-topic.
You can have all the government-decreed alphabet readjustments you want, (I know, that concept is completely unfathomable to the British Eh? ) - but it is the printers who seem to have driven all the changes.
Blame Gutenberg? Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 10:14:52 AM

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Gutenberg - good German name, that.

I think it started before him though.

"A single word in one Early Modern English text could have as many as thirty different spellings
and another text from the same time period may have another completely different set of spellings for the same word."
Topic Models and Spelling Variation: The Case of Early Middle English - Scott Kleinman (another good German name).

The scribe-monks had all their own shortcuts. A 'thorn' (þ) above a noun could well mean "the", where a superscribed (or maybe subscribed) 'thorn'-t (þͭ) meant 'that'.

Rather than being printers, I would say that it was 'mass-produced copying' which precipitated shortcuts which led to strange orthography.

*************

Original hand-writing



Printed approximation of handwriting




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 10:30:44 AM

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Let us not forget Sauerkraut. Whistle

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 10:58:30 AM

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How could we forget that?

And Bratwurst, Glockenspiel.

And, of course Kaftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung (which has been shortened a bit to 'car insurance').


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Bedells
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 12:29:43 PM

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Gesundheit
Poltergeist

Gestapo Whistle
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 3:29:23 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
thar wrote:
American pronunciation seems to ignore the umlaut. Whistle

Don't tell the Germans, but it's really a diaeresis - and it's meant to be put over the second of a pair of vowels if you want them pronounced separately.

Like Chloë is pronounced /kloʊ-e/
Chloe would be just /kloʊ/

Putting one over a single vowel is silly . . .


Häh? Mitäh? Voihan äkämä!

Whistle


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Lotje1000
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 4:21:15 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
And, of course Kaftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung (which has been shortened a bit to 'car insurance').


Why would you shorten that? It sounds amazing!
coag
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:07:19 AM

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German concatenation of words is interesting indeed. How far can you go with that?

Kaftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung without the hyphen would be even more interesting.

Thanks for mentioning the word Drag0nspeaker. I just learned that Haftpflicht is the German word for liability, obligation.
Lotje1000
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:12:03 AM

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Apparently the longest German word is "Donau­dampfschiffahrts­elektrizitäten­hauptbetriebswerk­bauunterbeamten­gesellschaft" which translates to "Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services".

I got it from Source which also lists the longest words in other European languages.
coag
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:43:34 PM

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Thanks for the response, Lotje1000.

The German word in Lotje1000's post has 79 letters. For those interested, the word is parsed out on this web site.

I've found the following, on the Internet.

The longest German word in dictionaries, is the word that Drag0nspeaker mentioned, Kraftfahrzeughaftpflichtversicherung (36 letters).

The longest non-coined and nontechnical English word is antidisestablishmentarianism (28 letters).

"Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary does not contain antidisestablishmentarianism (28 letters), as the editors found no widespread, sustained usage of the word in its original meaning. The longest word in that dictionary is electroencephalographically (27 letters)." (Wikipedia)
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2017 2:14:16 AM

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German Scrabble

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2017 2:45:36 AM

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^^^ Ho, ho, ho ^^^

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Kunstniete
Posted: Thursday, February 23, 2017 8:45:35 AM

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Eoin Riedy wrote:
German Scrabble



Yes, and we're very proud about those stupid extralong words. Whistle
If you'd see the names of certain laws we got in germany, you would possibly start crying & beg for mercy Applause

Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz
(which could maybe translated as "Law on the assignment of surveillance of labeling of beef")
Grund­stücks­ver­kehrs­ge­neh­mi­gungszu­stän­dig­keits­über­tra­gungs­ver­ord­nung
(which is mentioned in the pic and might be "Regulation of assignment of responsibility transport on estates")
coag
Posted: Friday, February 24, 2017 2:40:32 PM

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Do you have a dictionary or slang word for these long words or you just call them "long words"?

doppelgänger (another word with regard to the question in the original post)

On a lighter note, a German walks into a bar.
"Two Martinis, bitte."
"Dry?"
"Nein, I said TWO!"
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Friday, February 24, 2017 9:34:23 PM

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So, back to the original:

ersatz
fest
kaput
Uber
pretzel
spritzer

and,
       of course,
                      Nazi
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 2:09:46 AM

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Hummel

Whistle

Wiener schnitzel

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
coag
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 4:51:29 AM

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Frau
Strudel
Putsch
Anschluss
Panzer
Hertz (a unit of frequency)
Lebensraum
Eigen (as in eigenvector)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 5:31:03 AM

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coag wrote:
Hertz (a unit of frequency)

Well, if you want to be technical about it - Ohm


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 5:52:52 AM

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And I had always thought Finnish has the longest compound words. ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 6:07:56 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
And I had always thought Finnish has the longest compound words. ;-)

I'm sure you could put one together to compete . . .

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
coag
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 12:41:38 PM

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Achtung (Achtung Baby, U2's 1991 album)

Angst ("it was popularized in English early 20c. by translation of Freud's work,but as a foreign word until 1940s." Online Etymology Dictionary)
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