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Ethical question about disabled parking placard. Options
rmberwin
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 12:49:13 PM

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Joined: 5/30/2012
Posts: 74
Neurons: 337
I few years ago I had an extended illness and my doctor signed on to a California permanent disability placard. I eventually regained mobility, through a corrective surgery, and am now all right. But I still use the placard. I think these things are ill-conceived. I get a new one every two years, without medical review; and I can park anywhere, for as long as I want, for free. It is tempting to use it. I save hundreds of dollars a year, and in a busy lot I can pull right up to the storefront and find a space. We've all witnessed the scene--someone parking in a handicapped space and then galloping insouciantly away from the car, obviously able-bodied.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 1:09:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
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Neurons: 32,896
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Hi Win. I agree. it is ethically and actually legally wrong.

We had a friend who still used her husband's handicapped sticker after he died. She did not like it when I automatically blurted out one day when out with her, "But we can't park here".

The trouble is that some people do not look handicapped, but are.

There should be some sort of review before repeat cards are issued and there should be a time limit on the card such as my friend was using.





Sometimes the longest way around is the shortest way home. Anon
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 3:06:17 PM
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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Here in the UK the disabled parking 'Blue Badges' are reviewed every three years and an application must be supported by medical evidence.

They are issued to a particular person so if they are not present in the car or the car is not parking to pick them up they should not be used, and once a person has died as in Hopes case they should not be used.

If an area does not review such parking schemes in a strict way that's the fault of that particular area not disabled parking in general.

Having said that I have a friend whose has a disability and qualifies for a badge, unless you know the particulars of her condition it is difficult to know she is disabled.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 4:59:34 PM

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Joined: 6/4/2015
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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
There is currently an effort here to correct some of this. No longer will permanent placards be issued. Obviously doesn't correct the whole problem, but it's a start.
Listening . . .
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 11:07:56 PM

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Joined: 6/30/2011
Posts: 911
Neurons: 3,672
I never truly appreciated the purpose of those spots in the parking lot or the card that permits access, until my dad developed a severe form of COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Getting from the car to inside the store could wipe him out if one of those closer spots wasn't available. When I see someone get out of their car from a marked spot and ... skip ... into the store, I want to make them get back in the car and give it to someone who NEEDS it. For me, abuse of the card is one of the worst forms of selfishness.
rmberwin
Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 1:44:00 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 5/30/2012
Posts: 74
Neurons: 337
Listening . . . wrote:
I never truly appreciated the purpose of those spots in the parking lot or the card that permits access, until my dad developed a severe form of COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Getting from the car to inside the store could wipe him out if one of those closer spots wasn't available. When I see someone get out of their car from a marked spot and ... skip ... into the store, I want to make them get back in the car and give it to someone who NEEDS it. For me, abuse of the card is one of the worst forms of selfishness.


I think you're basically correct. To be fair to myself, I generally avoid parking in a disabled space when there is a lot of traffic, out of deference to people who really need it. But I believe I should quit doing it altogether.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
mactoria
Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 3:31:29 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2014
Posts: 385
Neurons: 582,065
Location: Stockton, California, United States
rmberwin wrote:
I few years ago I had an extended illness and my doctor signed on to a California permanent disability placard. I eventually regained mobility, through a corrective surgery, and am now all right. But I still use the placard. I think these things are ill-conceived. I get a new one every two years, without medical review; and I can park anywhere, for as long as I want, for free. It is tempting to use it. I save hundreds of dollars a year, and in a busy lot I can pull right up to the storefront and find a space. We've all witnessed the scene--someone parking in a handicapped space and then galloping insouciantly away from the car, obviously able-bodied.



So are you saying you actually still use this disability placard knowing you're "all right" ("...I save hundreds of dollars a year and in a busy lot I can pull right up...")? Hopefully you just wrote that confusingly and have given up using it. Too many misuse disability placards, while some people with no placard at all blatantly use the parking slots saved for persons with disabilities. Of course, some people who may appear not to have a disability may well have a hidden disability or forgot their placard, so it can be difficult to know whether to contact security or police for misusing a placard. People are left to use their own ethics and honesty with these placards (and the parking slots themselves). I worked 3 decades with disabled persons, so it's disturbing to see parking slots without placards. Making a person with a physical disability or severe health condition walk extra feet or be unable to use the extra space so their wheelchair lift can be operated is a hurtful thing, especially when you see a person "galloping away" while a person with a disability has to park elsewhere. So I will call security or police to report suspected misuse of disabled parking spots, and hope others do the same or at least leave a note on the car.

Being a fellow Californian, I suggest that you contact the DMV on-line or by phone to get them to stop sending the placard renewal. It's a waste of tax money and effort for them to be sending it. I can understand why the permanent placard program is used in our state --- automatic renewals save time and effort for people who'll never get well -- but it depends on doctors to use good judgment, and evidently people to notify the DMV when it's no longer used.
rmberwin
Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 12:25:24 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 5/30/2012
Posts: 74
Neurons: 337
mactoria wrote:
rmberwin wrote:
I few years ago I had an extended illness and my doctor signed on to a California permanent disability placard. I eventually regained mobility, through a corrective surgery, and am now all right. But I still use the placard. I think these things are ill-conceived. I get a new one every two years, without medical review; and I can park anywhere, for as long as I want, for free. It is tempting to use it. I save hundreds of dollars a year, and in a busy lot I can pull right up to the storefront and find a space. We've all witnessed the scene--someone parking in a handicapped space and then galloping insouciantly away from the car, obviously able-bodied.



So are you saying you actually still use this disability placard knowing you're "all right" ("...I save hundreds of dollars a year and in a busy lot I can pull right up...")? Hopefully you just wrote that confusingly and have given up using it. Too many misuse disability placards, while some people with no placard at all blatantly use the parking slots saved for persons with disabilities. Of course, some people who may appear not to have a disability may well have a hidden disability or forgot their placard, so it can be difficult to know whether to contact security or police for misusing a placard. People are left to use their own ethics and honesty with these placards (and the parking slots themselves). I worked 3 decades with disabled persons, so it's disturbing to see parking slots without placards. Making a person with a physical disability or severe health condition walk extra feet or be unable to use the extra space so their wheelchair lift can be operated is a hurtful thing, especially when you see a person "galloping away" while a person with a disability has to park elsewhere. So I will call security or police to report suspected misuse of disabled parking spots, and hope others do the same or at least leave a note on the car.

Being a fellow Californian, I suggest that you contact the DMV on-line or by phone to get them to stop sending the placard renewal. It's a waste of tax money and effort for them to be sending it. I can understand why the permanent placard program is used in our state --- automatic renewals save time and effort for people who'll never get well -- but it depends on doctors to use good judgment, and evidently people to notify the DMV when it's no longer used.


As I wrote in response to one of the posts, I have decided to stop parking in disabled spots (and I already tended to avoid them). And I misspoke when I said I save hundreds of dollars--these days I rarely need to park in metered spots. I unthinkingly conflated a hypothetical argument with an actual situation.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
Listening . . .
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 12:20:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2011
Posts: 911
Neurons: 3,672
rmberwin wrote:
Listening . . . wrote:
I never truly appreciated the purpose of those spots in the parking lot or the card that permits access, until my dad developed a severe form of COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Getting from the car to inside the store could wipe him out if one of those closer spots wasn't available. When I see someone get out of their car from a marked spot and ... skip ... into the store, I want to make them get back in the car and give it to someone who NEEDS it. For me, abuse of the card is one of the worst forms of selfishness.


I think you're basically correct. To be fair to myself, I generally avoid parking in a disabled space when there is a lot of traffic, out of deference to people who really need it. But I believe I should quit doing it altogether.


Rmberwin,
I think you have come to the right conclusion. Hopefully, you will never need to park close due to a physical disability but, if that day yet again arrives, a spot will be there when you need it.
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