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Does anyone really like cantaloupe melon? Options
rmberwin
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 4:16:30 PM

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I have a theory that no one actually likes cantaloupe.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 4:36:35 PM

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I think cantaloupe is the American word for melon, isn't it?

These things:


I like Galias, and Honeydew, Sugar Melon and a few I've had that I don't know the names of.

I don't like Watermelon very much - too much like sugar-water in a sponge.

According to one encyclopaedia (Foods & Nutrition Encyclopedia, 2nd Edition, Volume 1 - ISBN 084938981X)
"Originally, cantaloupe referred only to the non-netted, orange-fleshed melons of Europe. However, in more recent usage it has come to mean any orange-fleshed melon of C. melo, and has become the most popular melon in North America."

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
whatson
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 5:35:10 PM
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rmberwin wrote:
I have a theory that no one actually likes cantaloupe.


We Earthlings didn't know in your corner of Galaxy any fruit grew.
boneyfriend
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 6:16:17 PM

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I love cantaloupe. Where I live it is a very popular food in the summer.

There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. Ben Williams
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 7:02:12 PM

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FYI, cantaloupe and muskmelon are actually not the same thing. What we grow and consume in NA is actually muskmelon.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2017 7:23:34 PM

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Hmmm . . . Think

It would appear - from my experience shopping, from the image search for 'cantaloupe', etc - that the word 'cantaloupe' is mis-used quite regularly to mean "any muskmelon".

All those melons pictured above were labelled 'cantaloupe', but they are really different varieties of muskmelon.

musk•mel•on n.
1. a round or oblong melon, occurring in many varieties, having a juicy, sweet, yellow, white, or green, edible flesh.
muskmelon n
1. (Plants) any of several varieties of the melon Cucumis melo, such as the cantaloupe and honeydew
2. (Cookery) the fruit of any of these melons, having ribbed or warty rind and sweet yellow, white, or green flesh with a musky aroma

TFD


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 2:39:44 AM

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Wilmar (USA) wrote:
FYI, cantaloupe and muskmelon are actually not the same thing. What we grow and consume in NA is actually muskmelon.


The European Cantaloupe is still a variety of Cummin melo, but is a different variety than the one grown in North America.

http://foodilistic.com/food-facts/cantaloupe-muskmelon/

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Shulamit
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 3:25:37 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I think cantaloupe is the American word for melon, isn't it?


I don't think so. I've lived in the US all my life (getting longer all the time) and in my experience cantaloupe is the name used for only this one kind of melon. There are so many kinds of melons, it would be futile (and a pain in the keyboard) to list them all. To my knowledge, the cantaloupe is just one particular kind of melon and the name is not used for any other kind. Perhaps this is not the case in other countries.

As for liking or not liking cantaloupe: dear rmberwin, a good one is oh so very very delicious. But a bad one is mealy, bland, watery and probably better used for fleshing out the compost pile. As for watermelon: most of the watermelons you find in the stores nowadays are the seedless variety. The seedless watermelons I've had are exactly as you say, "sugar- water in a sponge". But if you get yourself a regular old seedful watermelon, why that's a different sponge altogether, in fact, not a sponge at all. This last season, I got only watermelons with seeds. The difference in taste was extraordinary: a distinctly singular kind of sweet and an unmistakable irreproducible flavor. We saved the rinds and made preserves with them.

In Berkeley, California, where I live, there are myriad produce stores and farmers' markets scattered throughout the city. Berkeley is not a big town but it's fairly cosmopolitan because so many colleges, universities and specialized educational institutions make for a high percentage of multi-national academics in the local population. So there are many markets specific to many foreign cultures. But my favorite is The Berkeley Bowl. It's a shame that I don't have any photographs of the place because it can make eyes bug out at the sight of it all.

I'm sure there are places like The Berkeley Bowl all over the world, but here, in northern California, It is THE place to take people from out of town. The mind boggling variety of produce makes jaws drop. You really can spend hours staggering through acres of vegetables, fruit, tubers, grains, nuts, legumes, herbs, spices, oilseeds, "and much much more," from every corner of the world. You can find all this stuff in specialty markets, but here it's all in one place. You want an apple, a melon, fungus, a cruciferous growth? You have a choice of varieties and subspecies presented in teensy, small, medium, large, extra large, obscene, preposterous, and mutant sizes, also categorized by country of origin.

There is a specially designated area for organic produce set aside from the "traditionally grown" produce. This is sort of misleading when you think about how many millennia humans have developed the tradition of cultivating edible plants and how very recently the large scale production of produce (factory farming) came into prominence with the attendant tonnage of chemical enhancements and pesticides. So maybe the two sections should best be labeled, "Traditional/Organic," and "Inadvisable"?

It is an entertainment just observing people clustering around something on the shelf asking each other, "What the heck is THIS?" or, "What do you do with THESE?" I am often one of those head scratching people. Recently, I was examining a pile of vegetables that looked like two foot long three sided sage green rods that tapered at either end. They were labeled, "drumsticks". The M.O. is to stand there waiting for someone with a heavy accent to walk up and start poking around to select a good one, and then ask, "Where do they come from? What do you call them in Svengali? What do they taste like and how do you prepare them?"

Nevertheless . . . and I guess all of my enthusiastic verbiage was beside the point . . . we are discussing cantaloupe, correct? SO: the difference between a factory farmed cantaloupe and an organically grown cantaloupe is dramatic (YOOOJ). Maybe you've been buying your cantaloupe from Monsanto, rmberwin? I'd love to mail some to you but, well, they might not be quite so tasty when they arrive. If you ever find yourself in this part of the world, I'd be honored to drag you there and then be embarrassed when you're not impressed.

But I could promise you a fine example of a cantaloupe. You wouldn't even need to wrap prosciutto around it to bring out the flavor. (Actually, a slice of cantaloupe is delicious wrapped in lox).



Variety is the spice of life. Lack of variety is the spouse of life.
srirr
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 4:20:07 AM

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In India, we do have different types of melons, but of course the most common is water melon. And it is really delicious.

Regarding cantaloupe, I do not have any idea what it actually is. As English is a foreign language, I am not known to names of different varieties of melon. Going through Dragon's post and later searching it on Google, I could figure out that cantaloupe is a fruit in the same family of that of muskmelon. In fact, the images that Dragon posted are 'types' of muskmelon and I can relate three or four different regional names for those. All these can commonly be labelled under one umbrella. We may address them with different names or with the same name as per our convenience.

Moreover, some products can be more common in some part of the world, while other parts may have other similar products.

And I must confess that I like water melon, muskmelon and varieties of muskmelon that are available here in the market. In summers, we have the luxury to enjoy these. And, if cantaloupe is one of them, I love it.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
kragen450
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 4:37:27 AM

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Let's put an Australian spin on this shall we?
Cantaloupe is called Rockmelon, and we love them here :)
Romany
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 6:00:33 AM
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Jeez, thanks, Kragen.

Even though I'd seen the pictures I still wasn't certain I had a handle on 'cantaloupe'. But if it's a rockmelon then I realise what it is.

I guess because I've always lived in hot countries, I'd never turn down ANY kind of melon!!

As someone said above - we tend to have different names for different kinds of melon all over the world - and so just refer to them all generally as 'melons' except for watermelon which is in a class of its own.

BUT...talking of seedy v. seedless watermelons - does anyone remember the days when ALL mangoes were hairy? You'd kinda strain them through your teeth and end up with long, hairy fibres between your teeth! But oh, that taste!

TMe
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 11:33:22 AM

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The pics posted by DragOnspeaker are the cantaloupes found in plenty in South Asia( may be at some other places too). These are very delicious and a delicacy in summer giving cooling effect but these are diuretics, (mean more urine producing). It's because of high water content in cantaloupes. Melon or watermelon is different with dark red pulp and generally having plain of striped green skin or peel.

I am a layman.
Romany
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 11:57:43 AM
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TMe - if you read what the other posters are saying, I think we have pretty much established that different countries/cultures have different ways of making distinctions. So, while I'm not at all arguing with you, just pointing out that I don't think it's possible to make didactic statement about this matter.

The distinctions in your part of the world may differ enormously from the distinctions just round the corner.
rmberwin
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 12:05:14 PM

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Shulamit wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I think cantaloupe is the American word for melon, isn't it?


I don't think so. I've lived in the US all my life (getting longer all the time) and in my experience cantaloupe is the name used for only this one kind of melon. There are so many kinds of melons, it would be futile (and a pain in the keyboard) to list them all. To my knowledge, the cantaloupe is just one particular kind of melon and the name is not used for any other kind. Perhaps this is not the case in other countries.

As for liking or not liking cantaloupe: dear rmberwin, a good one is oh so very very delicious. But a bad one is mealy, bland, watery and probably better used for fleshing out the compost pile. As for watermelon: most of the watermelons you find in the stores nowadays are the seedless variety. The seedless watermelons I've had are exactly as you say, "sugar- water in a sponge". But if you get yourself a regular old seedful watermelon, why that's a different sponge altogether, in fact, not a sponge at all. This last season, I got only watermelons with seeds. The difference in taste was extraordinary: a distinctly singular kind of sweet and an unmistakable irreproducible flavor. We saved the rinds and made preserves with them.

In Berkeley, California, where I live, there are myriad produce stores and farmers' markets scattered throughout the city. Berkeley is not a big town but it's fairly cosmopolitan because so many colleges, universities and specialized educational institutions make for a high percentage of multi-national academics in the local population. So there are many markets specific to many foreign cultures. But my favorite is The Berkeley Bowl. It's a shame that I don't have any photographs of the place because it can make eyes bug out at the sight of it all.

I'm sure there are places like The Berkeley Bowl all over the world, but here, in northern California, It is THE place to take people from out of town. The mind boggling variety of produce makes jaws drop. You really can spend hours staggering through acres of vegetables, fruit, tubers, grains, nuts, legumes, herbs, spices, oilseeds, "and much much more," from every corner of the world. You can find all this stuff in specialty markets, but here it's all in one place. You want an apple, a melon, fungus, a cruciferous growth? You have a choice of varieties and subspecies presented in teensy, small, medium, large, extra large, obscene, preposterous, and mutant sizes, also categorized by country of origin.

There is a specially designated area for organic produce set aside from the "traditionally grown" produce. This is sort of misleading when you think about how many millennia humans have developed the tradition of cultivating edible plants and how very recently the large scale production of produce (factory farming) came into prominence with the attendant tonnage of chemical enhancements and pesticides. So maybe the two sections should best be labeled, "Traditional/Organic," and "Inadvisable"?

It is an entertainment just observing people clustering around something on the shelf asking each other, "What the heck is THIS?" or, "What do you do with THESE?" I am often one of those head scratching people. Recently, I was examining a pile of vegetables that looked like two foot long three sided sage green rods that tapered at either end. They were labeled, "drumsticks". The M.O. is to stand there waiting for someone with a heavy accent to walk up and start poking around to select a good one, and then ask, "Where do they come from? What do you call them in Svengali? What do they taste like and how do you prepare them?"

Nevertheless . . . and I guess all of my enthusiastic verbiage was beside the point . . . we are discussing cantaloupe, correct? SO: the difference between a factory farmed cantaloupe and an organically grown cantaloupe is dramatic (YOOOJ). Maybe you've been buying your cantaloupe from Monsanto, rmberwin? I'd love to mail some to you but, well, they might not be quite so tasty when they arrive. If you ever find yourself in this part of the world, I'd be honored to drag you there and then be embarrassed when you're not impressed.

But I could promise you a fine example of a cantaloupe. You wouldn't even need to wrap prosciutto around it to bring out the flavor. (Actually, a slice of cantaloupe is delicious wrapped in lox).

Thank you for your considered reply. I take fresh fruit very seriously (I'm practically a fruitarian), and what you say about the typically available cantaloupes makes sense. When I was a kid, we had backyard Santa Rosa plum and apricot trees, and the taste of tree-ripened fruit was incomparably better than store-bought (likewise, my father grew corn and he says that the sugars turn to starch almost immediately after harvesting, and there is no substitute for fresh-picked corn). A few years ago I did manage to get hold of a perfectly ripened canary melon. The flesh was beginning to ferment, and when I ate it I almost cried. I'd love to travel around the world just tasting different bananas and mangoes.

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 6:52:46 PM

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My apologies to America, then.

It appears (from taking all your answers and relating them to geography) that what I thought was the American terminology is actually from some part of South Asia.
If I understand TMe correctly, all of this sort of white-, yellow- and orange-fleshed vine-fruit are called 'cantaloupes' there, and what are called 'melons' are the red-fleshed seedy things we call watermelon.

By proper definition, cantaloupes are one specific kind which are round (football shape, not rugby-ball shape), have yellow or green ribbed skin and orange or yellow flesh, and originate in Cantaluppi near Rome (canta-luppi - wolf's song?).
Of the four I pictured before, only the third (bottom-left) fits that description.




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope123
Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 8:33:02 PM

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Hi Win.

More than you ever wanted to know about melons, especially in Canada -

"The word "melon" can refer to either the plant or specifically to the fruit. Botanically, a melon is a kind of berry, specifically a "pepo". The word melon derives from Latin melopepo" Wiki

From the Watermelon Board -

"Loosely considered a type of melon (although not in the genus Cucumis), watermelon has a smooth exterior rind and a juicy, sweet interior flesh. Like the pepper, tomato, and pumpkin, watermelon is a fruit, botanically. It is the fruit of a plant originally from a vine of southern Africa."

http://web.extension.illinois.edu/dmp/palette/070729.html


"The term cantaloupe refers to two varieties of muskmelon. What we typically call a cantaloupe is Cucumis melo reticulatus, also called the North American cantaloupe. The variety name reticulatus refers to the net-like appearance of the skin, also called reticulated. The other variety, European cantaloupe, Cucumis melo cantalupensis, has ribbed light green skin and looks nothing like what we commonly call cantaloupe.

While both of these cantaloupe varieties are muskmelons, not all muskmelons are cantaloupes. The name muskmelon comes from the sweet fragrance of the ripe fruit. The term musk comes from a Persian word for perfume, and melon is a French word derived from the Latin melopepo, which means "apple-shaped melon". There are many different types of muskmelons, with a wide variety of shapes, sizes, flesh color and flavor."


http://www.canadianfruit.com/fruit-vegetables-wholesale.html


http://invorma.com/15-varieties-of-melons-with-pictures/

Drago, in Canada, cantaloupe would be the second or top right in your photos. From the photo on the second link I provided and from the skin, I think I also see The Hami melon here but I have never seen the name before. It looks like a cantaloupe too.

Number twelve on the second link is the third in your photos with the stripes and it is a kind of cantaloupe. They are not really popular here - I don't think I've seen it here before.

Honey Dew, Cantaloupe, and different shapes and sizes of watermelon are found here too.

I like melons, Win, but they don't always like me at certain times of the year. If you have allergies, Melon protein can cross react with grass and the weed Mugwort pollen proteins.

Melons should be washed before cutting to rid them of microbes and mold.


Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
TMe
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 12:38:03 AM

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'didactic' is too harsh a word to be hurled at a newbie. Two lines of opinion is not a thesis or a lecture.

I am a layman.
will
Posted: Tuesday, January 31, 2017 4:25:43 AM
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The big red fleshed ones are horrible. The rest are good, regardless of what they’re called.


.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:34:02 AM

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Yes , I like cantaloupe because it is so juicy, tasty and contain so many minerals usefully required by the human body.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 7:37:55 PM

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DragOnspeaker I like you pict of cantaloupe melon with cottage cheese...made me kinda hungry, thanks.
(Yikes! That's not cottage cheese, it looks like popcorn, that's a different spin!)

Excellent description Ashwin Joshi, juicy, sweet, and the saltiness of the cottage cheese (If you choose to have instead of popcorn) is a good balance, both are very good for you.

What's even better, but probably not as healthy, is Breyer's Vanilla Ice Cream with Potatoe Chips as the spoon...delish!


"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 6:05:14 AM

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In Singapore, cantaloupe or rock melon refers to melon with orange-colored flesh.
Honeydew refers to melon with the whitish-green flesh.

All of them would be called 'melon' in Indonesia.

A fruit seller once told me she knew I was Indonesian because I referred to a cantaloupe as 'melon'.

But why, yes, I love cantaloupe / melon / honeydew or any other fruit with similar watery-aquatic scent.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Sukses Muda
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 3:06:41 AM

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Amazing melons variety.. thanksApplause Applause Applause
progpen
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 5:58:46 PM

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Whatever this is called where you are:




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almo 1
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 5:19:09 AM
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hedy mmm
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 11:23:15 AM

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I wouldn't eat watermelon if you paid me Today's watermelons are seedless, (to make them bigger and easier to eat!) and are (GMO) genetically modified organisms...They are like eating a soggy sweet nothing (as DragOnslayer stated)...you can't find watermelon with pits anywhere, except maybe at a farmers market, (or my favorite red-neck cousins in the country). The Crystal Apple is GMO'd. Mango, Parcha, cantaloupe, honeydew, soursop, and other 'exotic' fruits have not been contaminated YET.

Sadly, the terminology GMO Is not required on certain foods, such as fish, which would be labeled 'wild caught' or 'farm raised'...the latter being GMO'd.

As GMO foods find their way in all we consume; fruits, vegetables, meats, fish, seafood, etc...the bee population will become extinct...and Man will be no more!
Google it!

You are what you eat!



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
almo 1
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 8:39:11 PM
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I've never had seedless watermelon,
I didn't even know there was seedless watermelon.


I've never seen food labelled "GMO" or "genetically modified".
I seldom eat junk food.

So I'm not genetically modified yet, I think.



hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 8:54:33 AM

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Junk food isn't the only GMO'd foods. Fruits, vegetables, vinegar, meats, fish, candy, cookies, beverages, etc.
You are lucky that your country hasn't caught up to GMOing all we injest.....(not sure if that's a word).
Let me not get started with hormones added to chicken or beef!

Our labeling in this country can be deceiving so as not to alert the consumer. With more conscientious and learned folk, it's getting harder and harder to fool us...

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 12:25:18 PM

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I didn't look closely - I think it's cottage cheese and chopped walnuts.

Popcorn doesn't sound right at all.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 12:53:34 PM

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Yikes! DragOnspeaker, you are so right...never had it like that...since January 30th I've been oblivious ...still sticking to cantaloupe with cottage cheese only...thanks for bringing back the original thread thoughts....almo 1 needs to try it with cottage cheese... It's scrumpelicious.....And walnuts sound like a winner!


"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 5:31:15 PM

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I like thinly sliced melon with iberico ham and a balsamic vinegar dressing.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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