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The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
kitten
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 3:07:25 AM

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Daemon wrote:
The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


The above quote comes from an article entitled, Worship, and everthing kept coming up with this poem with the aforementioned title. Here is the poem.....

Worship

This is he, who felled by foes,
Sprung harmless up, refreshed by blows:
He to captivity was sold,
But him no prison - bars would hold:
Though they sealed him in a rock,
Mountain chains he can unlock:
Thrown to lions for their meat,
The crouching lion kissed his feet:
Bound to the stake, no flames appalled,
But arched o`er him an honoring vault.
This is he men miscall Fate,
Threading dark ways, arriving late,
But ever coming in time to crown
The truth, and hurl wrongdoers down.
He is the oldest, and best known,
More near than aught thou call`st thy own,
Yet, greeted in another`s eyes,
Disconcerts with glad surprise.
This is Jove, who, deaf to prayers,
Floods with blessings unawares.
Draw, if thou canst, the mystic line,
Severing rightly his from thine,
Which is human, which divine.




The above was ALL I could find until the following article came up. The type is small but the words are powerful. I shall include the full copy at the end. I am very sorry to say I couldn't find the original publishing date. I start the conversation about half-way down.



Worship

By Ralph Waldo Emerson



In Italy, Mr. Gladstone said of the late King of Naples, "it has been a proverb, that he has erected the negation of God into a system of government." In this country, the like stupefaction was in the air, and the phrase "higher law" became a political jibe. What proof of infidelity, like the toleration and propagandism of slavery? What, like the direction of education? What, like the facility of conversion? What, like the externality of churches that once sucked the roots of right and wrong, and now have perished away till they are a speck of whitewash on the wall? What proof of skepticism like the base rate of which the highest mental and moral gifts are held? Let a man attain the highest and broadest culture that any American has possessed, then let him die by sea - storm, railroad collision, or other accident, and all America will acquiesce that the best thing has happened to him; that, after the education has gone far, such is the expensiveness of America, that the best use to put a fine person to, is, to drown him to save his board.

Another scar of this skepticism is the distrust in human virtue. It is believed by well - dressed proprietors that there is no more virtue than they possess; that the solid portion of society exist for the arts of comfort: that life is an affair to put somewhat between the upper and lower mandibles. How prompt the suggestion of a low motive! Certain patriots in England devoted themselves for years to creating a public opinion that should break down the corn - laws and establish free trade. "Well," says the man in the street, "Cobden got a stipend out of it." Kossuth fled hither across the ocean to fry if he could rouse the New World to a sympathy with European liberty. "Aye," says New York, "he made a handsome thing of it, enough to make him comfortable for life."

See what allowance vice finds in the respectable and well - conditioned class. If a pickpocket intrude into the society of gentlemen, they exert what moral force they have, and he finds himself uncomfortable, and glad to get away. But if an adventurer go through all the forms, procure himself to be elected to a post of trust, as of senator, or president, - though by the same arts as we detest in the house - thief, - the same gentlemen who agree to discountenance the private rogue, will be forward to show civilities and marks of respect to the public one: and no amount of evidence of his crimes will prevent them giving him ovations, complimentary dinners, opening their own houses to him, and priding themselves on his acquaintance. We were not deceived by the professions of the private adventurer, - the louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons; but we appeal to the sanctified preamble of the messages and proclamations of the public sinner, as the proof of sincerity. It must be that they who pay this homage have said to themselves, On the whole, we don`t know about this that you call honesty; a bird in the hand is better.



Worship - by Ralph Waldo Emerson. <<<<< please thank http://emerson.classicauthors.ner/Worship/ or as they prefer >>>>> Emerson, Ralph Waldo. "Worship." Great Literature Online. 1997-2011 <http://emerson.classicauthors.net/Worship/> (14 May, 2011).

I thank, my kitty and her patience, and about twenty-five Led Zeppelin songs,Anxious oh, and for the wonderful rain falling outside. I shall say this was my first reaction when I read the quote.

Daemon----these are getting harder. Boo hoo! Two of them the other day I couldn't even find sourced, so I left them blank. Shhh Silenced


peace out, >^,,^<





The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
MTC
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 4:40:34 AM
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...just too good and apt. How many times have we heard pious hypocrites posturing as virtuous. The ranks of politicians and preachers are replete with them; one hand on the Bible, the other in your pocket.
intelfam
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 4:43:30 AM

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Location: United Kingdom
Wow kitten that was good work! Like a detective story! Or maybe the DaVinci Code.
Thank you, because I have heard the quote used by cynics to do just what Emerson was criticising.


"The voice of the majority is no proof of justice." - Schiller
Jean_extraterre
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 9:08:08 AM
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Joined: 5/14/2011
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In fact, the quotation is from Emerson's "The Conduct of Life", a collection of essays published in 1860. One can find it on page 91 in an edition still available in print. -
In a customer review of this book, a reader (B. Davidson) remarks, that, while nowadays celebrity authors are making thousands of bucks for a speech, in those old times, R.W. Emerson, "the first American author known to receive payment for delivering a talk, was paid $5 and oats for his horse".
kitten
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 9:54:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/28/2009
Posts: 2,468
Neurons: 7,420
Location: the city by the bay
Jean_extraterre wrote:
In fact, the quotation is from Emerson's "The Conduct of Life", a collection of essays published in 1860. One can find it on page 91 in an edition still available in print. -
In a customer review of this book, a reader (B. Davidson) remarks, that, while nowadays celebrity authors are making thousands of bucks for a speech, in those old times, R.W. Emerson, "the first American author known to receive payment for delivering a talk, was paid $5 and oats for his horse".



Hello and welcome to the forum, Angel


Thank you very much for the above information. The date was given to one in a series of importantly written articles of the same title in, Project Gutenburg, but not the context. Or my eyes were too tired to see it.d'oh!

I thank you for the date, and for an easier article to read, as the above is hard on my eyes and I believe what Emerson is saying is important and applicable 150 years later. As he speaks of the many forms of worship and by whom.

But that is just my opinion.

from The Conduct of Life (1860, rev. 1876) - <<<<< www.emersoncenteral.com

peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Jai Majala
Posted: Sunday, May 15, 2011 2:24:52 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/28/2011
Posts: 82
Neurons: 246
Location: United States
Kinda reminds me of the Jimmy Carter hypocrisy movie.
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