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Heroes, notwithstanding the high ideas which, by the means of flatterers, they may entertain of themselves, or the world may... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, May 7, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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Heroes, notwithstanding the high ideas which, by the means of flatterers, they may entertain of themselves, or the world may conceive of them, have certainly more of mortal than divine about them.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754)
kitten
Posted: Saturday, May 7, 2011 1:23:37 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Heroes, notwithstanding the high ideas which, by the means of flatterers, they may entertain of themselves, or the world may conceive of them, have certainly more of mortal than divine about them. Henry Fielding (1707-1754)



The above quote if from, Tom Jones, by Henry Fielding. First published on 28 February 1749, . This man is a hoot regarding his writings. He talks at you, above you, to you and then tells a story and talks some more. Read his dedication and the start of Book v.


Perhaps this is where Billy Wilder learnt his narrative craft for movies. Think



Book IX; Chapter V.

An apology for all heroes who have good stomachs, with a description of a battle of the amorous kind.

Heroes, notwithstanding the high ideas which, by the means of flatterers, they may entertain of themselves, or the world may conceive of them, have certainly more of mortal than divine about them. However elevated their minds may be, their bodies at least (which is much the major part of most) are liable to the worst infirmities, and subject to the vilest offices of human nature. Among these latter, the act of eating, which hath by several wise men been considered as extremely mean and derogatory from the philosophic dignity, must be in some measure performed by the greatest prince, heroe, or philosopher upon earth; nay, sometimes Nature hath been so frolicsome as to exact of these dignified characters a much more exorbitant share of this office than she hath obliged those of the lowest order to perform.

To say the truth, as no known inhabitant of this globe is really more than man, so none need be ashamed of submitting to what the necessities of man demand; but when those great personages I have just mentioned condescend to aim at confining such low offices to themselves—as when, by hoarding or destroying, they seem desirous to prevent any others from eating—then they surely become very low and despicable.

Now, after this short preface, we think it no disparagement to our heroe to mention the immoderate ardour with which he laid about him at this season. Indeed, it may be doubted whether Ulysses, who by the way seems to have had the best stomach of all the heroes in that eating poem of the Odyssey, ever made a better meal. Three pounds at least of that flesh which formerly had contributed to the composition of an ox was now honoured with becoming part of the individual Mr Jones.

This particular we thought ourselves obliged to mention, as it may account for our heroe's temporary neglect of his fair companion, who eat but very little, and was indeed employed in considerations of a very different nature, which passed unobserved by Jones, till he had entirely satisfied that appetite which a fast of twenty-four hours had procured him; but his dinner was no sooner ended than his attention to other matters revived; with these matters therefore we shall now proceed to acquaint the reader.

Mr Jones, of whose personal accomplishments we have hitherto said very little, was, in reality, one of the handsomest young fellows in the world. His face, besides being the picture of health, had in it the most apparent marks of sweetness and good-nature. These qualities were indeed so characteristical in his countenance, that, while the spirit and sensibility in his eyes, though they must have been perceived by an accurate observer, might have escaped the notice of the less discerning, so strongly was this good-nature painted in his look, that it was remarked by almost every one who saw him.

It was, perhaps, as much owing to this as to a very fine complexion that his face had a delicacy in it almost inexpressible, and which might have given him an air rather too effeminate, had it not been joined to a most masculine person and mien: which latter had as much in them of the Hercules as the former had of the Adonis. He was besides active, genteel, gay, and good-humoured; and had a flow of animal spirits which enlivened every conversation where he was present.


The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling <<<< Please thank www.gutenber.org for the complete copy.

The history of Tom Jones<<<<< www.wikipedia.com



peace out, >^,,^<
MTC
Posted: Saturday, May 7, 2011 6:11:00 AM
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Experience shows that "heroes" in an abundance of humility frequently style themselves as "just like everybody else," while we, their appreciative audiences, elevate them to idols, larger than life. (Why the tug of war?) Fielding counteracts the tendency to idolize by reminding us that his earthy hero has "feet of clay."
jcbarros
Posted: Saturday, May 7, 2011 11:55:06 AM

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Being a hero causes personality alteration. I´m altered right now.
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Sunday, May 8, 2011 1:06:04 AM
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I think having "feet of clay" is a necessary condition for being a hero. If one were an angel, or a God--some divine or super human being, performing some heroic act would be doing what is theirs to do, without any sacrifice to one's self. But for a man who has risen above and beyond himself for the sake of another human being requires the cost of his/her personal expense. This is what I think makes a person a hero.
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