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Finland Independence Day Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 12:00:00 AM
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Finland Independence Day

The Finnish people lived under Russian control beginning in 1809. The Finnish nationalist movement grew in the 1800s, and when the Bolsheviks took over Russia on November 7, 1917, the Finns saw a time to declare their independence. They did so on December 6 of that same year. This day is a national holiday celebrated with military parades in Helsinki and performances at the National Theater. It is traditionally a solemn occasion that begins with a parade of students carrying torches and one flag for each year of independence. More...
RAJAT SINGH PARAMAR
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 9:52:44 AM

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Finland's Independence Day (Finnish: itsenäisyyspäivä, Swedish: självständighetsdagen) is a national public holiday, and a flag day, held on 6 December to celebrate Finland's declaration of independence from the Russian Republic in 1917.
Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Observance
3 State festivities
4 90th Anniversary commemorative coin
5 See also
6 References
7 External links
History[edit]
The movement for Finland's independence started after the revolutions in Russia, caused by disturbances inside Russia from hardships connected to the First World War. This gave Finland an opportunity to withdraw from Russian rule. After several disagreements between the non-socialists and the social-democrats over who should have the power in Finland, on 4 December 1917, the Senate of Finland, led by Pehr Evind Svinhufvud, finally made a Declaration of Independence which was adopted by the Finnish parliament two days later.
Independence Day was first celebrated in 1917. However, during the first years of independence, 6 December in some parts of Finland was only a minor holiday compared to 16 May, the Whites' day of celebration for prevailing in the Finnish Civil War. The left parties would have wanted to celebrate 15 November, because the people of Finland (represented by parliament) took power 15 November 1917. When a year had passed since declaration of independence, 6 December 1918, the academical people celebrated the day.[1]



monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 11:56:59 AM

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Congratulations to Finland Independence Day: Itsenäisyyspäivä

On 6th of December 1917 Finland declared its independence from Russia.

One tradition is to lite 2 blue-white candles and put them in the window.




THEMAID congratulates all Finns and we hope you enjoy your Karelian pasty (karjalanpiirakka).


https://dubaimaid.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/congratulations-to-finland-independence-day-itsenaisyyspaiva/
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 1:37:25 PM

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Congratulations, dear friends!
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:27:45 AM

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Today's Holiday
Finland Independence Day
The Finnish people lived under Russian control beginning in 1809. The Finnish nationalist movement grew in the 1800s, and when the Bolsheviks took over Russia on November 7, 1917, the Finns saw a time to declare their independence. They did so on December 6 of that same year. This day is a national holiday celebrated with military parades in Helsinki and performances at the National Theater. It is traditionally a solemn occasion that begins with a parade of students carrying torches and one flag for each year of independence.
taurine
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 6:44:23 AM

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I wonder what kind of dogs do they in Finland like most...



http://www.irishstamps.ie/shop/c-39-gifts-collectibles.aspx?pagenum=2
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 7:44:42 AM

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Congratulations, friends!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 9:17:41 AM

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taurine wrote:
I wonder what kind of dogs do they in Finland like most...


Finnish Spitz, Finnish Lapphunt, Karelian Bear Dog...


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
taurine
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 9:42:09 AM

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The second one is my favourite. It has longer hair in comparison to Karelian Bear Dog.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 2:07:31 PM

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Finland Independence Day

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 5:07:34 PM

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2017 means more than a new year to the Finnish: It's the 100th anniversary of Finland's independence from Russia



Finland belonged to Sweden for six centuries – until 1809 – and was then a Russian Grand Duchy until 1917, only gaining its independence at the end of World War I after the fall of the Tsarist Russian empire.


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