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Folklore, legends, myths, and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2016 12:00:00 AM
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Folklore, legends, myths, and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous, and manifestly unreal.

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2016 8:22:41 AM
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The line between real and unreal is thin and moreover movable...
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2016 10:56:19 AM

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
by L. Frank Baum




Introduction.



Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal. The winged fairies of Grimm and Andersen have brought more happiness to childish hearts than all other human creations.

Yet the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as "historical" in the children's library; for the time has come for a series of newer "wonder tales" in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairy are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling incidents devised by their authors to point a fearsome moral to each tale. Modern education includes morality; therefore the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.

Having this thought in mind, the story of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" was written solely to please children of today. It aspires to being a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heartaches and nightmares are left out.

L. Frank Baum
Chicago, April, 1900.


Read more:http://www.kancoll.org/books/baum/ozintro.htm
Shortknight
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2016 3:56:02 PM
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monamagda wrote:
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
by L. Frank Baum




Introduction.



Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal. The winged fairies of Grimm and Andersen have brought more happiness to childish hearts than all other human creations.

Yet the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as "historical" in the children's library; for the time has come for a series of newer "wonder tales" in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairy are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling incidents devised by their authors to point a fearsome moral to each tale. Modern education includes morality; therefore the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.

Having this thought in mind, the story of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" was written solely to please children of today. It aspires to being a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heartaches and nightmares are left out.

L. Frank Baum
Chicago, April, 1900.


Read more:http://www.kancoll.org/books/baum/ozintro.htm


Thankyou, that citation is beautiful!Applause
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2016 6:54:04 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Folklore, legends, myths, and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous, and manifestly unreal.

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919)


In our age legends, myths, and fairy tales belong solely to the domain of news reporting for adults: fantastic, marvelous, and
manifestly unreal though they are. As healthy youngsters they started out on the hallucinogens which made them believe only stories fantastic, marvelous, and particularly the manifestly unreal.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2016 8:57:03 PM

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Absurd facts reveal a need for fantasy.



"Now" is the eternal present.
pedro
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2016 4:24:45 AM

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What percentage of books read by adults are fiction? Just asking.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Absurdicuss
Posted: Sunday, October 30, 2016 2:27:55 AM

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Location: Jefferson, South Carolina, United States

An intriguing question pedro.

These numbers only pertain to the USA


Year Percentage of adults who read fiction

1982 56.40%
1992 54.20%
2002 46.60%
2008 50.20%
2012 46.90%

Source: National Endowment for the Arts

The article from MarketWatch also includes the interesting, but not surprising fact that women read more fiction than men.

I suppose that they need the escape.




"Now" is the eternal present.
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