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TheParser
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 8:07:25 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
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An acquaintance was recently bitten by a dog.

She went to her doctor, who gave her a tetanus shot and some antibiotics.

She expected that her doctor would also suggest a rabies vaccine (a series of 4 shots), but the doctor did not think it was necessary.

My acquaintance is very worried and may seek to see another doctor.

The health department in this part of the country feels that the risk of contracting rabies from a dog is very minimal.

But my acquaintance does not want to take any chances.

My acquaintance knows that I am a member of TFD (she is not. She occasionally reads some forums). She knows that dog rabies is very common in some countries, so she hopes that FTD members and guests who visit certain countries are very careful to avoid being bitten by dogs, no matter how friendly they may seem. The smaller dogs are often more aggressive than the larger ones.
towan52
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 11:23:42 AM

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Location: Midland, Texas, United States
Not a teacher or to be taken seriously:

If, on the collar, is a sign saying Trump/Pence, probably best to get a rabies/reality shot. Whistle

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 1:05:16 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I would try to avoid being bitten by a dog, no matter what country I was in - it hurts!

If I worried about all the illnesses I MIGHT get one way or the other, I'd be a nervous wreck.
I might get eaten by a shark when I go in the sea - it's not likely, I'm not going to worry about it, but I'm not going to go swimming near a shark's normal feeding-ground, either.

If I am bitten & it's not serious (just a bit of blood) then I'd clean it and put a plaster (band-aid) on it and let my body heal it up. Only if it needed stitches would I go to the hospital.
I've got antibodies and white blood cells, why do I need antibiotics for a cut?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Axel Bear
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 1:17:14 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/5/2015
Posts: 981
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
If I am bitten & it's not serious (just a bit of blood) then I'd clean it and put a plaster (band-aid) on it and let my body heal it up. Only if it needed stitches would I go to the hospital.
I've got antibodies and white blood cells, why do I need antibiotics for a cut?


Yeah...I wouldn't trust the NHS either.



Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 1:33:49 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Axel Bear wrote:
Yeah...I wouldn't trust the NHS either.

Huh!
Twice in my life I've needed to go to an NHS A&E unit for the odd stitch and bandage (I even got to wear a sling for a couple of days). Both times I got great service, excellent treatment good after-care. They even tried to reduce the scars on my wrist (but I don't mind - looks like stigmata!)

The one time I needed similar treatment in the USA was not bad.
I did feel a bit bad bleeding into my suitcase trying to find the forms to prove that I had medical insurance, before they would start.
Then the option at the end - I didn't NEED antibiotics, so they wouldn't be covered but I could pay for some for $100 if I wanted . . .

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 7:44:32 PM

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Location: Gualala, California, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I've got antibodies and white blood cells, why do I need antibiotics for a cut?


Antibiotic ointment is the most common and important treatment, after a thorough cleaning up with soap and clean water.

This is my only now.
Axel Bear
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 1:42:35 AM

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Antibiotics are much too widely (mis)used. Especially in the veterinarian industry. As a result, pathogens are becoming immune to these important drugs.




Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Axel Bear
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 1:42:35 AM

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Joined: 4/5/2015
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Antibiotics are much too widely (mis)used. Especially in the veterinarian industry. As a result, pathogens are becoming immune to these important drugs.


Redacted:

Having a second post is one way to increase my posting statistics.


Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Axel Bear
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 2:05:34 AM

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MelissaMe wrote:
Antibiotic ointment is the most common and important treatment, after a thorough cleaning up with soap and clean water.



And if that don't[sic] work: try honey.



Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 5:19:47 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Axel Bear wrote:
MelissaMe wrote:
Antibiotic ointment is the most common and important treatment, after a thorough cleaning up with soap and clean water.


And if that don't[sic] work: try honey.

I found a lot of people in the USA (well, in Florida) using 3% - 6% peroxide - a dollar a pint and more effective than many 'drug-type' antibiotics, and harmless.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Axel Bear
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 6:09:34 AM

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Joined: 4/5/2015
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I found a lot of people in the USA (well, in Florida) using 3% - 6% peroxide - a dollar a pint and more effective than many 'drug-type' antibiotics, and harmless.



Is it also harmless to the pathogens? Don't want any problems with PETA.



ps. Could have some side-effect on yer hair:




Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 9:14:59 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Axel Bear wrote:
Could have some side-effect on yer hair:

That peroxide is a bit stronger than 3%! And you have to use ammonia to make it bleach hair.

Food grade peroxide is 35%.
Don't drink it, but washing wounds with it seems OK.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 10:04:31 AM

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Joined: 8/10/2014
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Location: Gualala, California, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
MelissaMe wrote:
Antibiotic ointment is the most common and important treatment, after a thorough cleaning up with soap and clean water.

I found a lot of people in the USA (well, in Florida) using 3% - 6% peroxide - a dollar a pint and more effective than many 'drug-type' antibiotics, and harmless.


Peroxide is not harmless!

Quote:
When you dab hydrogen peroxide on a cut, that white, fizzling foam is actually a sign that that the solution is killing bacteria as well as healthy cells.

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a compound made up of two hydrogen atoms and two oxygen atoms, begins to breaks apart as soon as it contacts blood, creating that stinging sizzle. This is because blood and most living cells contain the enzyme catalase, which attacks hydrogen peroxide and converts it into water (H2O) and oxygen (O2).

Hydrogen peroxide has been used as an antiseptic since the 1920s because it kills bacteria cells by destroying their cell walls. This process is called oxidation because the compound's oxygen atoms are incredibly reactive, and they attract, or steal, electrons. With fewer electrons, bacteria cells' walls become damaged or even completely break apart.

Unfortunately, hydrogen peroxide's oxidation also destroys healthy skin cells. This is why many physicians and dermatologists currently advise against using hydrogen peroxide to clean wounds , as it has been found to slow the healing process and possibly worsen scarring by killing the healthy cells surrounding a cut.

Despite its negative effect on healthy cells, our bodies' cells naturally produce hydrogen peroxide when we metabolize food and turn it into energy. So how can a cell produce something that can destroy its own walls? That's where catalase steps in: when a cell creates hydrogen peroxide, it stores it inside the cell's specialized organelles, called peroxisomes, which contain hydrogen peroxide-busting catalase. Inside of a peroxisome, hydrogen peroxide decomposes and is turned into harmless water and oxygen gas .

Catalase is present in the cells of nearly all living organisms, so next time you want to amuse the kids with a fun science trick, pour some hydrogen peroxide on half of a raw potato and watch it fizzle.


I never use peroxide! Mycatracin or Bactroban for a few days, at most.

This is my only now.
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 11:15:21 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,573
Neurons: 21,472
MelissaMe wrote:
This is why many physicians and dermatologists currently advise against using hydrogen peroxide to clean wounds.


[/quote]

According to Dr. Kazu Suzuki of the Tower Care Center:

1. "In the wound care world, we say, 'Don't put anything in your wound that you wouldn't put in your eye. ' "

2. He suggests that you cleanse an open wound with clean running water for a few minutes.

3. To stop bleeding, apply direct pressure with clean gauze or a clean towel. (Unless you are on a prescription blood thinner, this should stop the bleeding.)

4. Do NOT "air out" the wound. Use a small amount of plain ointment and cover the wound with a sterile bandage.

*****

5. He agrees that alcohol, hydrogen peroxide or Betadine solution should NOT be used. Yes, they will kill some bacteria, but they also kill and irritate healthy skin and the wound bed.


Axel Bear
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2016 2:05:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/5/2015
Posts: 981
Neurons: 22,368


TheParser wrote:
Yes, they will kill some bacteria, but they also kill and irritate healthy skin and the wound bed.


The skin is covered with normal flora (aka skin microbiota)...not all is bad.






Toute nation a le gouvernement qu'elle mérite: Joseph de Maistre
Romany
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2016 1:13:42 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 12,832
Neurons: 39,115
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Unless cases of rabies have broken out in one's city or county there is absolutely no need whatsoever to be inoculated. For which everyone should be grateful!

Those living in countries where rabies is endemic - or even just ubiquitous - dread having to have a rabies injection. It's the most painful jab you can get, you have to retire to bed, you're horribly ill, you're put into quarantine; it's only a few rungs down from having rabies itself!

No doctor would put a person through that unless there was some sort of evidence that the dog had rabies.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, September 22, 2016 7:11:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
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"How to Protect Yourself from Dog Bites While Walking or Jogging!" Pethelpful.com.


That article can be googled by typing all the words (including the quotation marks) above.

The writer seems to know what s/he is talking about.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 22, 2016 5:16:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,856
Neurons: 146,496
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Here is the link.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TheParser
Posted: Friday, September 23, 2016 5:38:23 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,573
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Thank you very much for the link.
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