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Blue Remembered Earth Options
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2017 5:20:10 PM

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teregudi wrote:
the word that really has tons of meaning is "run".

I don't get what you are trying to get at, as I haven't got my dictionary. You'll have to get more clear if you want to get someone to get you!

I understood 'terminal shopping spree' to mean "one last shopping spree before they die".

I don't think it would be a wall made from concrete dust. Well, all concrete walls are made from cement dust, gravel and water, but you never say that.

As it's on Mars - where there are regular dust-storms - I guess it to mean a wall to try to keep out the dust. The boundary of 'civilised Mars'.

*********
Even the Scots make jokes about the Scots - but not so much about the financial side.

Some that I like:


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
teregudi
Posted: Monday, March 06, 2017 12:22:45 PM

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"Get" practically can mean anything in the world :D

Dust-wall is a wall that keeps dust away. That sounds pretty reasonable. Thanks!

The pictures are good, especially the caber toss xD

Unfortunately, I came across three more problems during rereading. Would you?

1.
It was Mira Gilbert, weightless now, fully divested of her mobility harness but equally at home in zero gravity as she was under water. She wore a skintight zip-up orange and grey outfit fitted with pockets and grab-patches.


How do you imagine those grab-patches? They are like some rough surfaces that help to grab onto something on a space ship?

2.
‘Been on high burn ever since it met the blowpipe package,’ Gilbert went on. ‘Keeps that up, it’ll reach the Winter Palace about ninety minutes ahead of us.’
‘Has to be one or both of the cousins,’ Geoffrey said.
This caught us with our flippers off,’ Gilbert said. ‘We didn’t think the blowpipe was working yet.’


If I think it correctly, this phrase is a made-up saying of aquatic people. It's not an actual saying but a sentence that the writer created for the merpeople. Am I right?

3.
‘I’d die, very probably. But I wouldn’t object to the basic unfairness of it. Doesn’t mean I’m tired of life, or ready to end it – not at all. But I’ve long since reached the point where I accept that I’m living on borrowed time. Every waking instant.’
‘I still don’t understand. Why now?’
‘Why what now?’ She sounded unreasonably prickled by the question.
‘Don’t tell me you just decided to leave the planet at the drop of a hat, Arethusa. Something’s prompted this. Where are you going, anyway? You can’t stay in the Winter Palace.’


"Prickled" here means "annoyed", right?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 06, 2017 5:02:28 PM

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1. I imagined patches of some sort of 'velcro' type material (millions of tiny hooks per square inch), from which you could hang things like tools or a purse.

Or which would grab onto a wall so you don't float about in zero gravity.



2. Yeah - the scuba-diver's equivalent to "They caught us with our pants down."

3. Yes - it's not a word I've heard.
As an adjective 'prickly' is "a bit irritable/easily annoyed".

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 12:23:36 PM

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teregudi wrote:


23.
His head was mostly hairless, save for a corona of fine white fuzz around his scalp, his face abundantly wrinkled, the already dark skin mottled by pure black lesions, yet remaining startlingly expressive. His eyes were clear and focused, his smile alarmingly youthful.


Why would someone's face become expressionless by a few lesions?



I read this as referring to his entire state, not just the last phrase. In other words, although the lack of hair and the wrinkled, mottled skin would suggest a weathered, inflexible appearance, his face was unexpectedly expressive.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
teregudi
Posted: Wednesday, March 08, 2017 5:17:00 PM

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Thank (both of) you!

Drag0nspeaker, I like that gif very much. That man is so ridiculous :D It reminds me of this:



(It's better with sound... that thump at the end xd)
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 4:53:54 AM

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Quote:

2.
The lower parts of the buildings, where they were accessible from street level or elevated walkways, were gaudy with layers of psycho reactive graffiti. The upper levels carried active banners and flags or daubs of fluid, oozing neon, alongside tethered balloons with illuminated flanks.

It describes a Lunar city. What exactly are those "daubs of fluid, oozing neon"? How should I imagine that? Please, help me with some rephrasing.



Intrigued by this discussion, I finally got a copy of this book. I mostly enjoy the story telling, plot twists, character development, and dialog that made me not want to put it down. Yet it is the descriptive paragraphs like this one that also motivate me not to put it down gently, but rather forcefully pitch it into the nearest rubbish bin.

My suggestion would be something like "patches of color in shades like neon light that appeared to be liquid oozing from the building".

Seriously, the author needs to make up his mind whether the color appears to ooze from the surface or to have been daubed onto the surface with a stiff brush.

And another thing, which part of a spherical balloon would you point to as a "flank"?

Brick wall

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 6:20:35 AM

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Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 6:40:05 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:


*LOL*

Your dirigible?

Whistle


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
teregudi
Posted: Thursday, April 27, 2017 6:59:06 AM

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Oops, sorry, leonAzul, I haven't read your reply until now. But I'm glad that even a native speaker gets confused about some of the paragraphs. It tells me I'm not that stupid. Thanks for your help!

Again, folks, I need some help to understand a few things. Here they come:

1.
Sunday found her point of view moving towards the aircraft. Acting independently of her volition, her line of sight dipped as if she was kneeling to peer into the inverted bulge of the shattered canopy. The seat was upside down, the buckled harness dangling open where it had been released. The cockpit was empty.


If the harness was buckled, how could it be open (or released)?

2.
‘I’ve never been here before,’ Geoffrey said, ‘but I’m very familiar with this space – from whenever she talked to us, whenever she delivered one of her sermons.’ The words were a struggle. ‘This wasn’t just an empty shell. It was full of trees, full of greenery and light. Like a jungle. There were plants, borders, paths and stairs. It rained. There should be a whole closed cycle ecology running in here.’


They are in a space habitat, a station orbiting the Moon. What does "border" mean in this context?

3.
Geoffrey felt his world lurch slightly back into sanity, if only for a few lucid moments. He was still reeling from the absence of the jungle. Even if the air in the chamber had been swapped for pure oxygen and allowed to consume itself, there’d still be ashes… scorching. Yet there was nothing. The flooring under his feet had the improbable antiseptic gleam of an airpod showroom.


How could pure oxygen turn the jungle into ashes? It just burst into flames on its own?

4.
Hector – who else could it possibly be? – was on his back, spreadeagled and motionless, staring straight up towards the central axis and the Winter Queen. Next to him, resting on the ground, was a white rectangular box like a big first aid kit. Traceries of luminous arterial red ran down the suit’s matte black limbs and defined the form of the chestplate and helmet. The Akinya Space logo glowed on the upper shoulder joint of the nearest arm.


Okay, I know what traceries are (interlacing decorative lines) but I can't imagine how mere lines on the limbs can define the form of the chestplate and helmet. Could anyone explain that to me?
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, April 27, 2017 8:27:47 AM

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teregudi wrote:

1.
Sunday found her point of view moving towards the aircraft. Acting independently of her volition, her line of sight dipped as if she was kneeling to peer into the inverted bulge of the shattered canopy. The seat was upside down, the buckled harness dangling open where it had been released. The cockpit was empty.


If the harness was buckled, how could it be open (or released)?


The harness is "buckled" in the sense that it is held together by buckles, only some of which had been released.

teregudi wrote:

2.
‘I’ve never been here before,’ Geoffrey said, ‘but I’m very familiar with this space – from whenever she talked to us, whenever she delivered one of her sermons.’ The words were a struggle. ‘This wasn’t just an empty shell. It was full of trees, full of greenery and light. Like a jungle. There were plants, borders, paths and stairs. It rained. There should be a whole closed cycle ecology running in here.’


They are in a space habitat, a station orbiting the Moon. What does "border" mean in this context?

This refers to a garden border, which can be paving blocks, a swale, small hedge, kerb, etc. that is used to define sections. This sort of border is frequently used to keep the lawn from growing into a flower bed, for example.

teregudi wrote:

3.
Geoffrey felt his world lurch slightly back into sanity, if only for a few lucid moments. He was still reeling from the absence of the jungle. Even if the air in the chamber had been swapped for pure oxygen and allowed to consume itself, there’d still be ashes… scorching. Yet there was nothing. The flooring under his feet had the improbable antiseptic gleam of an airpod showroom.


How could pure oxygen turn the jungle into ashes? It just burst into flames on its own?

This is hyperbole. The meaning is that the jungle was removed without a trace that it ever existed. I agree with you that it is carelessly written, but to be generous, perhaps that was done to express the character's state of confusion, rather than the author's.
Whistle

teregudi wrote:

4.
Hector – who else could it possibly be? – was on his back, spreadeagled and motionless, staring straight up towards the central axis and the Winter Queen. Next to him, resting on the ground, was a white rectangular box like a big first aid kit. Traceries of luminous arterial red ran down the suit’s matte black limbs and defined the form of the chestplate and helmet. The Akinya Space logo glowed on the upper shoulder joint of the nearest arm.


Okay, I know what traceries are (interlacing decorative lines) but I can't imagine how mere lines on the limbs can define the form of the chestplate and helmet. Could anyone explain that to me?

He is describing the presence of blood as not only down the limbs but also across the chestplate and helmet — in other words, splattered across the head and torso, and running along the members.
Sick

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 27, 2017 9:27:43 AM

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Many things will burn furiously in a pure-oxygen atmosphere which will not - or will hardly - burn in normal air.
"Flash-fires" are much more possible in oxygen.
However, as leon says, this is just a mystified thought - "Where did it all go?"

define vb (tr)
4. (often passive) to delineate the form or outline of: the shape of the tree was clearly defined by the light behind it.

These are not very good examples.

The edges and shape of the helmet are fluorescent red.
The edges of the chest-plate are outlined in red (well, blue in this photo, red in the book).




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
teregudi
Posted: Thursday, April 27, 2017 11:24:29 AM

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Now it's all clear to me, thanks for your explanations!

Just three more questions (for now):

5.
Geoffrey approached the form, always keeping the centrifuge arms in view. As one of the capsules sped past him, he grasped what must have happened to his cousin. There was a door in the capsule: a dark circular aperture in the leading hemisphere.
‘Hector was trying to get inside.’
Figures,’ Jumai said slowly. ‘I mean, he would, wouldn’t he? Comes this way, finds things aren’t the way they’re meant to be… what else is he going to do but try to get aboard the ship?’ She took a step back as the other capsule whooshed by. ‘Think this was a surprise to him?’


She says that she thinks the same? Or she has already figured it out? I don't really understand. And what would he do? Could you write it down with other words?

6.
He was amidships: aft lay the engine assembly and the nuclear power plant; fore lay the command deck. He was hanging in a corridor, hexagonal in cross section, with panels and lockers arranged in longitudinal strips. Between the strips were recessed ladders, grip-pads and handholds. The main lights were on, and everything looked very clean and tidy.


I wonder what a "grip-pad" looks like. What do you think? I can't imagine a soft pad that can be gripped by someone to hold him/her in zero gravity.

7.
‘We’re tracking you, but we don’t have a handle on your trajectory yet. Where are you headed?’
‘If the ship’s to be believed,’ Geoffrey said, ‘an iceteroid in the Kuiper belt.’
Gilbert looked apologetic. ‘You won’t make it out of Earth–Moon space at this rate. You’re running way outside the safe operating envelope for that type of propulsion system.’
Hector looked sceptical. ‘You’ve figured that much out in just a few minutes?’
‘You’re lighting up near Lunar space like a Roman candle. You need to find a way to throttle back, and urgently. At the very least, you’re going to burn so much fuel you won’t have a snowball’s hope of slowing down this side of the Oort cloud.’
‘The ship has its own ideas,’ Geoffrey said.
‘You’ll have to do something. You’ve already reached the point where no local traffic has enough delta vee to catch up with you – and that includes Quaynor, I’m afraid.’


Now, are they going so badly and riskily that they won't make it out of Earth–Moon space, or are they going so smooth and fast that they won’t have a chance of slowing down this side of the Oort cloud? It seems like a contradiction to me.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 27, 2017 12:12:56 PM

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Yes - I think "Figures" really means something like - 'yes, I agree, that would make sense'.

‘Hector was trying to get inside.’
‘. . . he would, wouldn’t he? . . .what else is he going to do but try to get aboard the ship?’

He came, noticed something wrong and tried to get aboard the ship and (I think) mis-timed getting into the moving capsule and was hit (and killed?).

***************
I think 'grip-pads' are probably the same as 'grab-patches'.

*************
If you have your speed and trajectory wrong, two things might happen - you can burn up in the atmosphere or shoot off into space.
These are usually more troublesome or critical when you're coming in to land, not when you're taking off.
From MY calculations, if the ship's engines just don't stop firing, one choice is that they'll shoot off faster and faster and eventually run out of fuel so they won't be able to slow down, stop or change direction.
The other possibility is that the engines will overheat and the ship will just evaporate in a cloud of flame.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
teregudi
Posted: Thursday, April 27, 2017 4:15:49 PM

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Okay, I think I get it. Thank you very much! Now I can finalize the first two part of the book. There's only one more part and it is the shortest one. No doubt I'll have problems with that, too, so I hope I can count on you later as well :)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, April 28, 2017 4:21:54 AM

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I need to read all three books again, I don't even now remember the overall point of the series, except that Mankind progresses technologically, but does not really change in character.
There are still altruists and self-centred profit-hounds and lots of normal people - it's not a utopia or a dystopia.
I like the imaginative science innovations.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
teregudi
Posted: Thursday, August 10, 2017 8:07:14 AM

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Hey, guys!

I promise this will be the last time when I bother you with silly questions about this book. It's almost done. Please, help me cross the finish line.

1.
‘Processed ice, of course. Water, most likely, although it doesn’t have to be. Boosted at high gee in a magnetic cradle, followed by a shove from ablative pusher lasers once it’s cleared the launcher. The lasers do most of the work. They can steer the package for quite some distance after launch by applying off centred ablation. What you saw there was a vapour trail: the package’s own steam rocket exhaust.’


He talks about ice packages launched from an asteroid by lasers. The last sentence gives me the impression that the packages have rockets attached to them. But it doesn't make any sense. These are just ice packages, nothing more (said the raven...). Or am I wrong? Maybe the author just compares the vapouring trail of ice to the exhaust of a rocket?

2.
The thing was a golem. He could tell that much as it came around the curve. It was humanoid, but it moved with the manic, limb whirling energy of a gibbon, the quadruped gait too rhythmic and choreographed to look entirely natural. It was tumbling head over heels, yet maintaining impressive forward momentum. Only when the golem neared the door did its movements settle into something more plausibly organic.


I feel a contradiction here. The golem's move is rhythmic and choreographed first, then it is described as "tumbling head over heels"... What? Am I missing something?

3.
‘I’m but one facet of the artilect,’ Eunice said, ‘and I was only activated after you had already established your credentials. Until then, Lionheart was guarding itself, as it has done for more than sixty years. If certain autonomic vigilance protocols acted with excessive zeal… then you must forgive me.’
‘If you’ve read my memory, you’ll know that you killed one of us,’ Geoffrey said.
‘I didn’t pick that up,’ Eunice said, and for a moment there was something like contrition in her tone. ‘It must have happened very shortly before the scan. The memories hadn’t had time to cross the hippocampus, to be encoded into long term storage. If there were casualties–’


That is a usual figure of speech in English? So she actually begs for his forgiveness? Or she really commands him to forgive her?

4.
‘Something’s definitely changed. Maybe it’s you, maybe it’s me.’ Jumai looked up and down the hall, holding her tongue as a proxy strode past – not one of the household units, Geoffrey decided. ‘Look, I’ll only say this once. Being here isn’t normal for either of us, and I’m not one for funerals at the best of times. But when I get back to Lagos, will you come over and spend a few days? I mean, work permitting.’


What does she mean? She's not fond of funerals (what a surprise...) or she is not "suitable" for funerals?

5.
‘She spoke to me once,’ Sunday replied, ‘about how it would feel to just keep going. To never go home again.’ She paused, trying to call her grandmother’s exact words to mind. ‘Until Earth was just a blue memory. What I didn’t realise was… she meant to do it.’
She could still be–’ Geoffrey began. But he caught himself before the sentence was out.
Sunday nodded. He didn’t need to say what he was thinking. She was thinking the same thing herself.
She supposed the only way to know for sure would be to go out there. To catch up with that impossibly distant thing and see what was inside it.
A sleeping lion, perhaps. Senge Dongma.
Jitendra said, ‘I think it’s time.’


There should be only one reasonable thing he wanted to say, but I'd like to be sure about it because that unfinished sentence is a bit odd for me. They are talking about Eunice who was believed to be dead at the beginning of the book, but then it turned out that she had never lived at that place where they thought she did, and she had left the solar system long time ago. Does Geoffrey want to say that she might be dead anyway, even if she didn't die when they thought she did? I hope I was clear.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 5:36:47 AM

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teregudi wrote:
Hey, guys!

I promise this will be the last time when I bother you with silly questions about this book.
Promises, promises . . .

1. ‘Processed ice, of course. Water, most likely, although it doesn’t have to be. Boosted at high gee in a magnetic cradle, followed by a shove from ablative pusher lasers once it’s cleared the launcher. The lasers do most of the work. They can steer the package for quite some distance after launch by applying off-centred ablation. What you saw there was a vapour trail: the package’s own steam rocket exhaust.’

He talks about ice packages launched from an asteroid by lasers. The last sentence gives me the impression that the packages have rockets attached to them. But it doesn't make any sense. These are just ice packages, nothing more (said the raven...). Or am I wrong? Maybe the author just compares the vapouring trail of ice to the exhaust of a rocket?

No - it is a steam rocket. A rocket is any motor which uses reaction mass moving in one direction to push something in the opposite direction (a squid/cuttlefish uses a water-rocket).
The lasers boils the ice (ablation) and the steam shoots off in one direction, pushing the ice-mass in the opposite direction. A very simple rocket-motor.


Noun 1. rocket engine - a jet engine containing its own propellant and driven by reaction propulsion.
Farlex wordnet.

Quote:
2.The thing was a golem. He could tell that much as it came around the curve. It was humanoid, but it moved with the manic, limb whirling energy of a gibbon, the quadruped gait too rhythmic and choreographed to look entirely natural. It was tumbling head over heels, yet maintaining impressive forward momentum. Only when the golem neared the door did its movements settle into something more plausibly organic.

I feel a contradiction here. The golem's move is rhythmic and choreographed first, then it is described as "tumbling head over heels"... What? Am I missing something?

You may be . . . I think you have too narrow a view of 'choreograph' and 'head over heels'.

Many fight-scenes in films - exactly which body will fly in which direction and land in exactly which position - are choreographed. It can include somersaults, rolls, spins or anything really.

"Head over heels" is simply moving from an upright position to the opposite - the golem was turning somersaults or flips as its way of moving forward, but it was too controlled and rhythmic to look natural.


Quote:
3. ‘I’m but one facet of the artilect,’ Eunice said, ‘and I was only activated after you had already established your credentials. Until then, Lionheart was guarding itself, as it has done for more than sixty years. If certain autonomic vigilance protocols acted with excessive zeal… then you must forgive me.’
‘If you’ve read my memory, you’ll know that you killed one of us,’ Geoffrey said.
‘I didn’t pick that up,’ Eunice said, and for a moment there was something like contrition in her tone. ‘It must have happened very shortly before the scan. The memories hadn’t had time to cross the hippocampus, to be encoded into long term storage. If there were casualties–’


That is a usual figure of speech in English? So she actually begs for his forgiveness? Or she really commands him to forgive her?

Yes it's quite common (maybe a little formal).
It's neither begging not commanding (British people don't usually beg or demand anything) - sort of a neutral "there's a good excuse, it would be reasonable that you don't blame me".
"You must excuse me if I seemed rude - I wasn't expecting visitors."
.


Quote:
4.‘Something’s definitely changed. Maybe it’s you, maybe it’s me.’ Jumai looked up and down the hall, holding her tongue as a proxy strode past – not one of the household units, Geoffrey decided. ‘Look, I’ll only say this once. Being here isn’t normal for either of us, and I’m not one for funerals at the best of times. But when I get back to Lagos, will you come over and spend a few days? I mean, work permitting.’

What does she mean? She's not fond of funerals (what a surprise...) or she is not "suitable" for funerals?

Probably a little stronger than "not fond of", but the same sort of meaning. She's a little upset by funerals at the best of times . . . and these are not the best of times.

Quote:
5.‘She spoke to me once,’ Sunday replied, ‘about how it would feel to just keep going. To never go home again.’ She paused, trying to call her grandmother’s exact words to mind. ‘Until Earth was just a blue memory. What I didn’t realise was… she meant to do it.’
She could still be–’ Geoffrey began. But he caught himself before the sentence was out.
Sunday nodded. He didn’t need to say what he was thinking. She was thinking the same thing herself.
She supposed the only way to know for sure would be to go out there. To catch up with that impossibly distant thing and see what was inside it.
A sleeping lion, perhaps. Senge Dongma.
Jitendra said, ‘I think it’s time.’


There should be only one reasonable thing he wanted to say, but I'd like to be sure about it because that unfinished sentence is a bit odd for me. They are talking about Eunice who was believed to be dead at the beginning of the book, but then it turned out that she had never lived at that place where they thought she did, and she had left the solar system long time ago. Does Geoffrey want to say that she might be dead anyway, even if she didn't die when they thought she did? I hope I was clear.

I think you're right - but he's looking at it the opposite way - though she was not in the winter palace, she was so old they would expect she may well be dead anyway, but:
"She could still be alive, travelling out of the galaxy."

She would be in cryo-sleep, probably (in stasis, frozen) - A sleeping lion.





Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
teregudi
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 6:30:35 PM

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Drag0nspeaker! I knew I could count on you :) You were a great help again, thank you for that! Without your able help this translation wouldn't be the same ;) All hail Drag0nspeaker!
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