The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Texas is getting ready to execute a man who has not murdered anyone. Options
Chazlee
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2016 4:46:04 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 3,722
Texas is a unique state, and it has a legal system which is also unique in many ways. Soon, the powers to be in the state of Texas are going to execute a borderline mentally disabled man with an IQ of 80. How can they do that?

Well, the soon to be executed man, Jeffery Lee Wood "was convicted and sentenced to death under what’s called the law of parties, which has been in effect in Texas since the 1970s. It states that a person who “solicits, encourages, directs, aids, or attempts to aid the other person to commit an offense” is also criminally liable for that offense. Under the law, prosecutors are not required to prove that a defendant had any part in committing a crime, or even intended to commit it. Jurors only need to find that there was a plan to commit a crime and that the defendant should have anticipated that the crime would occur."

This case is complicated by the fact that Woods, at one time, planned with another man,Daniel Reneau, to steal a safe from a store but the plan was called off. Nonetheless, even though Woods did not know Reneau had a gun or even planned to still rob the safe, when Reneau followed though on the original plan and murdered someone, both he and Woods were sentenced to death. Reneau has already been executed and soon it will be likely that Woods will be executed as well.

I see two problems with this case. One is that Woods is a mentally disabled man. The second problem is that even though he originally planned a robbery, he backed out of the deal but his partner, Reneau, still went through with it and he, Reneau, murdered someone, but Woods will likely die for a crime in which he was sitting in a truck and had idea was about to take place.

Honestly, I have a difficult time understanding why Woods is even in prison at all, since he did not know a crime was going to take place, nor did he take part in the crime.

Do members on this site think it is fair to kill Woods? Please share your thoughts about this issue.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/08/12/in-texas-a-man-who-didnt-kill-anybody-is-about-to-be-executed-for-murder/?utm_term=.e9f72b432bdd


towan52
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2016 5:19:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2012
Posts: 1,638
Neurons: 151,949
Location: Midland, Texas, United States
Silenced Silenced Silenced Brick wall

"Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint."
L.Rai
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2016 7:38:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/20/2014
Posts: 638
Neurons: 530,249
Location: Grover Beach, California, United States
Chazlee:

Having attended law school I understand this from a legal perspective...which is very different from the moral aspect from which non-legal people view this issue. Often the law and our moral sense don't seem to agree.

All I can tell you is that it comes down to "intent" and since this man had the "intent" to commit the crime that is all the law looks at when passing judgment.

I do agree with you that his mental capacity needs to come into play here and something went very wrong in his defense. However, from a "legal" aspect, he would be guilty even if he changed his mind.

To fully grasp this concept study the legal definition for the word "intent" then it might make sense.

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
Chazlee
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2016 11:31:19 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 3,722
L.Rai wrote:
Chazlee:

Having attended law school I understand this from a legal perspective...which is very different from the moral aspect from which non-legal people view this issue. Often the law and our moral sense don't seem to agree.

All I can tell you is that it comes down to "intent" and since this man had the "intent" to commit the crime that is all the law looks at when passing judgment.

I do agree with you that his mental capacity needs to come into play here and something went very wrong in his defense. However, from a "legal" aspect, he would be guilty even if he changed his mind.

To fully grasp this concept study the legal definition for the word "intent" then it might make sense.



L. Rai,

I know what you mean about the law and our moral sense not always being in agreement, and the situation with this mentally ill man who did not kill anyone nor did he know someone was going to be killed is a good example of this divide between the two.

Since you studied law then you may have heard what the late Justice Scalia had to say on the issue of executing innocent people. "This Court has never held that the Constitution forbids the execution of a convicted defendant who has had a full and fair trial but is later able to convince a habeas court that he is 'actually' innocent," Scalia wrote in a 2009 dissent of the Court's order for a federal trial court in Georgia to consider the case of death row inmate Troy Davis. "Quite to the contrary, we have repeatedly left that question unresolved, while expressing considerable doubt that any claim based on alleged 'actual innocence' is constitutionally cognizable."

I think Justice Scalia was wrong.
What's your thoughts about him and this issue.
Peace to you.

http://www.businessinsider.com/antonin-scalia-says-executing-the-innocent-is-constitutional-2014-9

Eireann (Erin)
Posted: Saturday, August 13, 2016 1:34:55 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/21/2012
Posts: 2
Neurons: 104,106
Location: Whittier, California, United States
No, Jeffrey Lee Wood should not be executed. Why? It's obvious to me that while Wood DID plan to steal that safe, he apparently did NOT plan to kill anyone. Unfortunately someone did get killed, not by Wood, but by his literal partner-in-crime, Reneau. To me, justice has been served for whoever was killed. Just send Wood to prison for both planning and stealing the safe. But I live in California, not Texas, so I am not familiar with the Texas state justice system. That is my answer.

Attitude is a little thing that makes a BIG difference. -Winston Churchill
Chazlee
Posted: Saturday, August 13, 2016 9:25:46 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 364
Neurons: 3,722
Eireann (Erin) wrote:
No, Jeffrey Lee Wood should not be executed. Why? It's obvious to me that while Wood DID plan to steal that safe, he apparently did NOT plan to kill anyone. Unfortunately someone did get killed, not by Wood, but by his literal partner-in-crime, Reneau. To me, justice has been served for whoever was killed. Just send Wood to prison for both planning and stealing the safe. But I live in California, not Texas, so I am not familiar with the Texas state justice system. That is my answer.



I agree with you that since the actual killer has already been executed for his crime, then it seems a more just sentence for Woods would be to send him to prison for his original part in planning the robbery. However, I hate the "law of parties" since it actually seems to have been used in this case, and other cases I know happened in Texas, to execute people when they were not the one who actually killed anyone.

I think it's interesting what is happening in California, where you're from, with the horribly overcrowded prison system there. It seems there is no good or easy solution. Opening the gates and letting out large numbers or incarerated people probably does not make the locals feel that comfortable, but there is simply no enough room, I have heard, to keep everyone locked up.

Care to share your thoughts about this issue?

Peace.
L.Rai
Posted: Saturday, August 13, 2016 6:18:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/20/2014
Posts: 638
Neurons: 530,249
Location: Grover Beach, California, United States
Dear Chazlee:

I really don't have any thoughts on Justice Scalia...but on the topic of innocence or guilt...hmmm. I do believe that our justice system while far from perfect is better than some of the other systems around the world. That said, I also believe that in the US you stand a better chance of getting a "fair" trail than in other parts of the globe. I am not saying the US system is the best, but given some other options, I'd prefer our system. Those are my thoughts.

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.