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Girolamo Savonarola Executed for Heresy (1498) Options
Daemon
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Girolamo Savonarola Executed for Heresy (1498)

Savonarola was an Italian preacher and religious reformer. After the overthrow of the Medici family, he became the ruler of Florence, setting up a democratic but severely puritanical government. He was opposed by the allies of the Medici and by Pope Alexander VI, who attempted to restrain Savonarola's unusual interpretations of scripture and his claim of prophecy. He was tried, convicted of heresy, and hanged. His government was known for its "bonfire of the vanities," which was what? More...
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 2:30:15 AM

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Torturing and executing people for 'heresy'! Just like DAESH today.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 1:15:15 PM

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Bonfire of the Vanities (Falò delle vanità)
On February 07, 1497, the Bonfire of the Vanities took place in Florence, Italy, as supporters of the Dominican priest Girolamo Savonarola burned thousands of objects deemed to be associated with vanity, temptation, and sin. Artworks, books, cosmetics, dresses, mirrors, musical instruments and much more were burned. It was seen as a religious act, as a cleansing of the soul and a rejection of worldly pleasures. His bonfire took place on the day of the Mardi Gras festivities—traditionally a series of carnival celebrations beginning on the Epiphany and ending on the day preceding Ash Wednesday.

Although the 7 February Bonfire of the Vanities was the most notorious of these fanatical fires—involving thousands of objects all going up in smoke in front of the Florentine public—it was not the only one. Rather, these sorts of burnings had been a regular accompaniment to the Franciscan missionary San Bernardino di Siena’s outdoor sermons in the first half of the 15th century, only on a smaller scale.

Many great cultural works were incinerated in Girolamo Savonarola’s day of destruction, including copies of books thought to be immoral, including works by Boccaccio, as well as manuscripts of secular songs. Many antique sculptures and paintings were burned, including pieces by successful artists such as Fra Bartolomeo and Lorenzo di Credi. It is even thought that several masterpieces by the great Sandro Botticelli, most famous for painting the Birth of Venus, were willingly burned by the artist, who was a follower of Savonarola’s. According to Giorgio Vasari’s The Lives of the Artists (the first ever book of art history), "Botticelli was so ardent a partisan that he was thereby induced to desert his painting, and, having no income to live on, fell into very great distress!"

The Bonfire of the Vanities was orchestrated by the charismatic, passionate Savonarola, who was known for his apocalyptic sermons. After the ruling Medici dynasty was overthrown in 1494, he was effectively the political—as well as spiritual—leader of the city of Florence, and his great bonfire was the high point of his career. However, his popularity fell away at an astounding rate afterwards, and the following year he was excommunicated and executed.

http://www.historychannel.com.au/classroom/day-in-history/422/bonfire-of-the-vanities
monamagda
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 1:21:52 PM

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The above painting of Savonarola's burning is from 1498, with no known painter. It shows the Piazza della Signoria in Florence oddly empty of people - there was a huge crowd for the event. At the rear is the Palazzo Vecchio (Old Palace), with the Loggia dei Lanzi on the far right. This painting now hangs in the city's Museo di San Marco.

http://www.sexualfables.com/Bonfire-of-the-Vanities.php

Rahul Goyal
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 7:36:32 PM

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