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Daemon
Posted: Sunday, December 13, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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welter

(noun) A confused mass; a jumble.

Synonyms: clutter, jumble, mare's nest, muddle, smother

Usage: Surrounded by a welter of papers and magazines, Susan began work on her scrapbook.
8BooksOfSengathe
Posted: Sunday, December 13, 2015 10:39:05 AM

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Joined: 12/30/2014
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Daemon wrote:
welter

(noun) A confused mass; a jumble.

Synonyms: clutter, jumble, mare's nest, muddle, smother

Usage: Surrounded by a welter of papers and magazines, Susan began work on her scrapbook.




The retired lady's laundry room became a
welter of overdue laundry.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, December 13, 2015 10:45:15 AM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Notes: Today's word still may be used as a verb meaning "wallowing, twisting and turning", as in 'The boat weltered helplessly in the stormy waters.' The verb also meant at one time "to beat until welts rise on the body". It is possible that the boxing class, welterweight, took its name from this verbal use. The present participle, weltering, serves as adjective and noun.

In Play:
In 1863 John Greenleaf Whittier used the original meaning of today's word in his poem, Andrew Rykman's Prayer, "In the welter of this sea | Nothing stable is but Thee." Today it is used mostly in its figurative sense, "Reingold found himself slowly drowning in a welter of obligations."

Word History: Today's word came to us from Middle English welteren "to roll, to toss about (as in high seas)" from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch welteren "to roll." Now it is a noun referring to the results of being tossed about. The Proto-Indo-European ancestor of today's word, *wel-/*wol- "to turn, roll," was highly prolific. The German verb walzen "to roll" is a descendant, as is the English word waltz and wallow. Whelk, referring to the American conch, and welt are also descendants. Old English wealcan "to roll, toss," another relative, reached us as walk. Volume in the literary sense originally referred to a roll of writing. It comes from the Latin variant of this root, seen in volvere "to roll", and is found elsewhere in convolute, involve, and revolve. Finally, Russian volna "wave" and Czech/Slovak vlna "wave; wool" bubbled up from the same source.


http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/welter
Irma Crespo
Posted: Sunday, December 13, 2015 8:00:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/24/2014
Posts: 1,471
Neurons: 106,057
Location: Panamá, Panama, Panama
Noun 1. welter - a confused multitude of thingswelter - a confused multitude of things
clutter, fuddle, jumble, mare's nest, muddle, smother
disorderliness, disorder - a condition in which things are not in their expected places; "the files are in complete disorder"
rummage - a jumble of things to be given away
Verb 1. welter - toss, roll, or rise and fall in an uncontrolled way; "The shipwrecked survivors weltered in the sea for hours"
roll over - make a rolling motion or turn; "The dog rolled over"
2. welter - roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"welter - roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"
wallow
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
3. welter - be immersed in; "welter in work".
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