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Of all the liars in the world, sometimes the worst are your own fears. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Of all the liars in the world, sometimes the worst are your own fears.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)
gerry
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2015 1:28:58 AM
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Location: Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Liars live on the dumbness of the truth tellers if you know the truth lies do not matter
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2015 5:00:10 AM
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Yeah, your own liars are most potent and most challenging of them all... Fear or recklessness, we have what we have.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2015 11:32:54 AM

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Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
We cannot see the future and its perils and problems loom big in our eyes sometimes.
JUSTIN Excellence
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2015 6:07:27 PM

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Location: Veinau, Baden-Wuerttemberg Region, Germany
The controversy like the one in today Daemon's Mr Kipling quote, indeed, was the most acute, not only because it was the first general moral-theological controversy in Islam but also because due to its very nature. It threatened the fabric of the Muslim Community most seriously. The controversy was precisely this: What is the definition of a Mu'min or a Muslim and can a man continue to be regarded as a Muslim even if he commits a grave moral error? The Khārijites not only declared such a person as a Kāfir but they attributed Kufr to those who did not declare such a person as a Kāfir, and further declared the necessity of Jihād against them. Against this alarming challenge the need was felt of a catholic definition of Islam which should be acceptable to the ‘majority’. Would not such a definition necessarily be middle-of-the-road — and, therefore, correct? The first reaction to the Khārijī uncompromising fanaticism was Murjī'ism i.e. the doctrine -- most probably favoured by the Umayyad state -- that a person who professes to be a Muslim should not be declared non-Muslim because of his deeds, and that the state of his inner spirit must be left to God for final judgment. Of course, if the Community was to survive at all some such definition was necessary and a modified Murjī'sm — through making some sort of a distinction between Islam and Imān — came, in course of time, to constitute an essential factor of orthodoxy, i.e. the beliefs of the majority of the Community. The following famous Hadīth is a typical Murji'ite Hadith and is to be found in both al-Bukhārī and Muslim :

Quote:
The Companion Abū Dharr relates that the Prophet said, "There is none who professes that 'there is no god but God' but that he shall enter Paradise." Abū Dharr asked, “Even though he should commit adultery and theft?” "Even though he should commit adultery and theft", replied the Prophet. Abū Dharr repeated the question three times and got the same answer from the Prophet who added with his third affirmation, "Though Abū Dharr’s nose should be in the dust" — i.e. despite the wishes of Abū Dharr. We are told that whenever Abū Dharr related this Hadīth, he repeated the phrase (proudly), "Though Abū Dharr’s nose should be in the dust."


The same Hadīth is related by Abū Yūsuf in his Kitāb al-Āthār, only not from Abū Dharr but from another Companion, Abū'l-Dardā'; and Abū Yūsuf adds that Abū'l-Dardā' used to relate this Hadīth every Friday by the pulpit of the Prophet.

In order partially to redress the moral shock which a sensitive person may experience at being told that people may continue to be good Muslims "even though they should commit adultery and theft," a more compromising and refined view was put forward in a Hadīth recorded by Abū Dāwūd and al-Tirmidhī viz. that the Prophet said,

Quote:
Where a person commits adultery, Faith goes out of him and remains above his head like a canopy; but when he passes out of this (state of sinful) act, Faith returns to him.


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