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Steamboat Willie Released (1928) Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Steamboat Willie Released (1928)

In 1928, Walt Disney created cartoon icon Mickey Mouse, who made his debut in the silent film Plane Crazy. That same year, Mickey also appeared in Steamboat Willie, written and directed by Disney and animator Ub Iwerks. An immediate hit, the film was Disney's first attempt at using sound and the first fully synchronized sound cartoon. Music is prominently featured, and Mickey first appears in the film whistling the song Steamboat Bill. Who provided the voice for Mickey? More...
MelissaMe
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 10:28:13 AM

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I love it that the #1 of the top 50 cartoons is also my favorite!

This is my only now.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 11:46:00 AM

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The intention of the creators of the earliest Mickey Cartoons was to be funny before anything else. At that time, moral authority of the animation industry was left to the writers who obviously were not overly concerned with minor details that could be seen as offensive (Aja). Disney and his team of animators were responsible for making sure the material they were presenting was appropriate for children, which in some cases, it wasn’t.

There has been increasing displeasure of the way that Mickey treats the other animals on the steamboat in the past twenty years. Yet, even with Mickey’s apparent frustration or devious nature at times during the cartoon short, it is clear that the character was not abusing the animals out of meanness (Aja). Disney and his animators’ choices can be justified by saying that the treatment of the animals was “all in good fun”, but for some, the material was deemed inappropriate and needed to be censored.

Read this very interesting analysis: http://lauraview.blogspot.com/2012/01/steamboat-willie-analysis.html
MelissaMe
Posted: Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:09:31 PM

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Joined: 8/10/2014
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Location: Gualala, California, United States
Geeze, Louise, it's a CARTOON, for sweet pity's sake! I grew up watching them, and it didn't turn me into an animal abuser to see Wiley E. Coyote smashed to smithereens time and time again.

Maybe it messed with my sense of reality, but making me violent, not at all.

It's the "it looks real" violence in movies and real live people acting badly on television shows that are bad for children. And other people!

This is my only now.
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