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I hold any writer sufficiently justified who is himself in love with his theme. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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I hold any writer sufficiently justified who is himself in love with his theme.

Henry James (1843-1916)
J W Henderson
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2015 4:19:49 AM

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This emphasizes the importance of passion for one's art.
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2015 4:23:10 AM
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Yeah, every single writer has at least one passionate reader...
Sayyed Hassan
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2015 8:59:58 AM

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Henry James, OM (15 April 1843 – 28 February 1916) was an American writer who spent most of his writing career in Britain. He is regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.

He is best known for a number of novels showing Americans encountering Europe and Europeans. His method of writing from a character's point of view allowed him to explore issues related to consciousness and perception, and his style in later works has been compared to impressionist painting. His imaginative use of point of view, interior monologue and unreliable narrators brought a new depth to narrative fiction.

James contributed significantly to literary criticism, particularly in his insistence that writers be allowed the greatest possible freedom in presenting their view of the world. James claimed that a text must first and foremost be realistic and contain a representation of life that is recognisable to its readers. Good novels, to James, show life in action and are, most importantly, interesting.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2015 10:05:31 AM

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Context from : ITALIAN HOURS
By Henry James - Published November 1909


VENICE

It is a great pleasure to write the word; but I am not sure there is not a certain impudence in pretending to add anything to it. Venice has been painted and described many thousands of times, and of all the cities of the world is the easiest to visit without going there. Open the first book and you will find a rhapsody about it; step into the first picture-dealer's and you will find three or four high-coloured "views" of it. There is notoriously nothing more to be said on the subject. Every one has been there, and every one has brought back a collection of photographs. There is as little mystery about the Grand Canal as about our local thoroughfare, and the name of St. Mark is as familiar as the postman's ring. It is not forbidden, however, to speak of familiar things, and I hold that for the true Venice-lover Venice is always in order. There is nothing new to be said about her certainly, but the old is better than any novelty. It would be a sad day indeed when there should be something new to say. I write these lines with the full consciousness of having no information whatever to offer. I do not pretend to enlighten the reader; I pretend only to give a fillip to his memory; and I hold any writer sufficiently justified who is himself in love with his theme.

Read the book here :http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6354/6354-h/6354-h.htm#link2H_4_0002
Virginia Lathan
Posted: Monday, November 9, 2015 3:41:51 PM

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So, from reading a portion of Henry James’ biography, he seems to be saying whether the setting is Venice or Venus or Vicks Roadside Café, it’s just a backdrop for the ideas and thoughts that pop from a writer’s heart...as they beg to be filliped as powerfully as shooting stars.

As a writer, I agree.
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, November 10, 2015 1:03:03 AM
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Daemon wrote:
I hold any writer sufficiently justified who is himself in love with his theme.

Henry James (1843-1916)


"...only to give a fillip to his (reader's) memory"

With a flick of the writer's finger
A reader's filliped memory will linger
Hidden in ashes of consciousness, a cinder
From a past bonfire, enough to be a new tinder.





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