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The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to finish the job.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)
gerry
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 1:40:36 AM
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Time - time oh presious friend of mine
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 3:27:47 AM

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Let us never know what old age is. Let us know the happiness time brings, not count the years.
Ausonius
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 3:33:55 AM

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Forty is the old age of youth; fifty the youth of old age.
Victor Hugo
CheVegas ☁️ ✈ ☁️
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 9:36:35 AM

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As a person of "early performance," I disagree. He makes retirement sound like snuggling after ejaculating prematurely.
bwozniak
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 9:42:18 AM
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I agree, CheVegas...with your disagreement of "early performance". Early success might instead lay groundwork for later masterpiece(s). I'm thinking moreso in terms of art here, but nonetheless, I think old age can be accentuated by "early performance" insofar as it establishes the work ethic needed to become successful, no matter the discipline.
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 10:59:39 AM
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Every fruit has its own time to ripen. What really matter is taste and taster - how they meet each other...
Sayyed Hassan
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 2:14:35 PM

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Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot, he was influenced both in his novels and in his poetry by Romanticism, especially William Wordsworth.[1] Charles Dickens was another important influence.[2] Like Dickens, he was highly critical of much in Victorian society, though Hardy focused more on a declining rural society.

While Hardy wrote poetry throughout his life and regarded himself primarily as a poet, his first collection was not published until 1898. Initially, therefore, he gained fame as the author of novels, including Far from the Madding Crowd (1874), The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891), and Jude the Obscure (1895). Hardy's poetry, though prolific, was not as well received during his lifetime. It was rediscovered in the 1950s, when Hardy's poetry had a significant influence on the Movement poets of the 1950s and 1960s, including Philip Larkin.[3]

Most of his fictional works – initially published as serials in magazines – were set in the semi-fictional region of Wessex. They explored tragic characters struggling against their passions and social circumstances. Hardy's Wessex is based on the medieval Anglo-Saxon kingdom and eventually came to include the counties of Dorset, Wiltshire, Somerset, Devon, Hampshire and much of Berkshire, in southwest and south central England.
ddaniel
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 3:17:36 PM

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I am not quite there yet, but as I approach, the journey speaks of the repetition that will soon come.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 6:53:55 PM

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Context from :THE LATER YEARSOF THOMAS HARBY 1892 1928 - BY FLORENCE EMILY HARDY

PART IV
LIFE'S DECLINE

The Dynast at Oxford; honorary degree; a deputation; a controversy 1920 : AET. 78-80

On June 2nd of this year came Hardy's eightieth birthday, and he received a deputation from the Society of Authors, consisting of Mr. Augustine Birrell, Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins, and Mr. John Galsworthy. The occasion was a pleasant one, and the lunch lively. Many messages were received during the day, including one from the King, the Lord Mayor of London, the Cam- bridge Vice-Chancellor, and the Prime Minister,

Hardy pencilled down the following as "Birthday notes";

"When, like the Psalmist, 'I call mine own ways to remembrance', I find nothing in them that quite justifies this celebration.

"The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to complete their job.

"We have visited two cathedrals during the last month, and I could not help feeling that if men could get a little more of the reposefulness and peace of those buildings into their lives how much better it would be for them.

"Nature's indifference to the advance of her species along what we are accustomed to call civilized lines makes the late war of no importance to her, except as a sort of geological fault in her continuity.

"Though my life, like the lives of my contemporaries, covers a period of more material advance in the world than any of the same length can have done in other centuries, I do not find that real civilization has advanced equally. People are not more humane, so far as I can see, than they were in the year of my birth. Disinterested kindness is less. The spontaneous goodwill that used to characterize manual workers seems to have departed. One day of late a railway-porter said to a feeble old lady, a friend of ours, 'See to your luggage yourself. Human nature had not sunk so low as that in 1840.

https://archive.org/stream/lateryearsofthom009186mbp/lateryearsofthom009186mbp_djvu.txt

Amber Gray
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 6:56:24 PM

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I agree that old age -- that is, the interpretation of or feelings around it -- are subjective in nature. There is the chronological and biological aging, and there is the psychological and spiritual aging.
Depending on the person, old age can be positive, negative, or anywhere in between.
There are so many different types of people each at their own pace of life, that defining old age concretely from a philosophical standpoint is impossible. It is a subjective experience influenced by a great number of personal and environmental factors.
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