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Drunk as... Options
srirr
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2011 12:30:37 AM

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My personal saying on this is:

Drink like a man and eat like animal.

When I say this, people stare at me and I need to explain it. If you know about eating habits of an animal, it will not eat if it is not hungry. Also, it will eat only to its content, not beyond that. No over-eating.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2011 7:58:39 AM

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My Grandmother is over eighty and still doesn't need glasses. Drinks right out of the bottle.
- Henny Youngman

Reminds me of my safari in Africa. Somebody forgot the corkscrew and for several days we had to live on nothing but food and water.
- W. C. Fields

When I read about the evils of drinking, I gave up reading.
- Henny Youngman


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2011 5:11:42 PM

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It only takes one drink to get me drunk. Either the twelfth or thirteenth.

Sanity is not statistical
dlux3
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2011 11:32:26 PM

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Krapula sounds very apt, yes. I don't think I've seen 'trolleyed' yet, an abbreviation of a british term 'off your trolley'. Does anyone know the origin of that gem? Trolleyed has been my expression of choice lately.

I liked GeorgeV's palindrome and I intend to quote him at my next oracle to Dionysus.

The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2011 11:57:04 PM

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[quote=dlux3]Krapula sounds very apt, yes. I don't think I've seen 'trolleyed' yet, an abbreviation of a british term 'off your trolley'. Does anyone know the origin of that gem? Trolleyed has been my expression of choice lately.

According to Cassell's Dictionary of Slang the phrase relates to the Manhattan trolley ( streetcar ) system. They were not permitted overhead cables, so power was supplied through a ground rail. If the trolley came off the rail it lost all motive power. A 1908 exemplum is cited.

Sanity is not statistical
dlux3
Posted: Thursday, January 6, 2011 12:05:56 AM

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Ah, American then. I stand corrected.

I enjoy those snippets of useless information.

The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, January 6, 2011 12:23:24 AM

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Try and keep up Alias,
it also means crook, rhymes with look, hook does too.
dlux3
Posted: Thursday, January 6, 2011 7:45:26 PM

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'Captain Cook', for a look.

The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, January 6, 2011 8:15:15 PM

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dlux, I know a limerick very similar to those very words, ha ha
Alias
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 10:54:33 AM

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Katzenjammer....another word for a hangover....

Having a Bo Peep ..also means to have a look. As for crooks and hooks...its a Tea leaf for a thief..but one of my personal favourites is Skin and Blister for sister...

I think its about time chickens are able to cross the road without constantly having their motives challenged!
blahblah
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 3:03:49 PM

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Arfax, I have heard "fait comme un rat," meaning drunk.

Finally found an internet page that backs me up!

Être fait comme un rat
Être pris, démasqué, pris au piège. Par extension : être saoul.
“J’ai tourné à droite, c’était une impasse. J’étais fait comme un rat”
To be trapped like a dog.

(from http://www.p-interactif.com/spip.php?article31)
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 5:01:13 PM

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Cockney slang: Billy Monk = drunk



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
blahblah
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 5:12:17 PM

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Schindler's List - pissed.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 5:37:25 PM

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Ann Gover = hangover


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
kitten
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 6:24:54 PM

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Alias wrote:
Katzenjammer....another word for a hangover....

Having a Bo Peep ..also means to have a look. As for crooks and hooks...its a Tea leaf for a thief..but one of my personal favourites is Skin and Blister for sister...



Katzenjammer comes from this cartoon strip. I thought the strip was funny, but some thought it racist as well as immigrants being 'in their cups.' Andy Capp was also removed from the funny papers because he drank, beat up Flo and didn't pay his bills.Think Shhh Silenced

As though removing it would make it all go away.d'oh!


peace out, >^,,^<







The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Romany
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 10:30:10 PM
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One my parents used to use: Drunk as a fiddler's bitch.

As a bitch always referred to a female dog (which term my mother declared an oxymoron)in our house, I spent years puzzling about that one. Still do.
excaelis
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 10:48:16 PM

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Romany wrote:
One my parents used to use: Drunk as a fiddler's bitch.

As a bitch always referred to a female dog (which term my mother declared an oxymoron)in our house, I spent years puzzling about that one. Still do.


No really convincing origin for this one out there. It appears that fiddlers were often paid in ale so..... However, while researching it online I found a wonderful site called The Drunktionary, which is now in my favourites list. I haven't figured out the link-posting thing. sorry.

Sanity is not statistical
bethm
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 11:03:22 PM

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The Drunktionary
OMG Ex, how can I ever thank you?! OK everybody, I'll be away for a while, studying...

How's this for a parting note?!


Opens one's collar to piss
kitten
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 11:08:34 PM

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She's been a good wife to him.

The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
excaelis
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 11:14:54 PM

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Thanks, Kitten. I'm just a total yutz with these machines.

Sanity is not statistical
gradyone
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 11:54:22 PM

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Romany wrote:
As a bitch always referred to a female dog (which term my mother declared an oxymoron)in our house, I spent years puzzling about that one. Still do.

I'm puzzling, too, Romany. Your mother declared. . what?. . was an oxymoron? female dog = oxymoron? Meaning all females are dogs? Or all dogs are females? Hmmm, the first is mean-spirited, the second is reproductive nonsense. I see your quandary.

My mother's mother believed all women (in low times, including herself) are bitches. My mother spent her adolescence and adult life undoing the damage her mother had inflicted on her childhood. She made sure my sister grew up holding her head high. My sister's daughters have reaped the rewards of my mother's diligence.

Did I see 'blitzed' on the list of synonyms for drunk?

One's concoction for easing or curing a hangover is 'hair of the dog that bit ya.' Tomato juice seems to figure in some portion of many of those potions. All hail, Bloody Mary! Just don't hail too loudly, please. . Anxious . Or at least until tomorrow.


Viva Geronimo
bethm
Posted: Saturday, January 8, 2011 9:47:55 AM

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Romany wrote:
One my parents used to use: Drunk as a fiddler's bitch.

As a bitch always referred to a female dog (which term my mother declared an oxymoron)in our house, I spent years puzzling about that one. Still do.


I'm not a dog breeder but I've read some great books* that informed me. In the serious dog worlds of hunting and show competition, a girl-dog is a bitch. A boy-dog is a dog.

*(the "Sister" books by Rita Mae Brown, starting with Outfoxed;
the Melanie Travis books by Laurien Berenson, starting with A Pedigree to Die For)
Romany
Posted: Saturday, January 8, 2011 9:11:54 PM
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Yeah Bethm, Gradyone,

my mother came from the serious world of hunting, breeding, and Showing - she bred Airedales, my Grandfather British Bulldogs and horses for The Hunt.(Hey, don't blame me: I would never harm one little red hair of a foxes head!) I grew up in a world where the word "Dog" referred ONLY to a male canine.Thus "FEMALE dog" was a nonsense. A female dog was a bitch, plain and simple and anyone who eschewed this word was "mealy-mouthed".

As you can imagine, that went down a treat when I finally entered Convent school!

And Ex:

Well then, according to your research, perhaps a Fiddler who was really good would get bought so much ale he would pass it on to his "female dog" who would stagger around and add to the entertainment? (It's a thought. Not such a good one, but a thought, no less)

And yeah, thanks for passing on that site, too!
excaelis
Posted: Saturday, January 8, 2011 9:36:20 PM

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De nada, Romany. The only other origin I found was in the usage of ' fiddler ' to mean a ' trifler '; a shallow worthless person, the parentage of whose female companions may well have been open to question.

Sanity is not statistical
intelfam
Posted: Sunday, January 9, 2011 10:34:51 AM

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I might have found the same reference as excaelis gave on Saturday on wiki.

"DRUNK AS A FIDDLER'S BITCH This one stumped most of you, but Anne
Layton-Bennett wrote from Tasmania to say she knew it well, having
been brought up in the North of England. She found this entry for
the term in _The Dictionary of Modern Phrase_ by Graeme Donald: "At
wakes and village parties, the fiddler was usually unpaid, but
could eat and drink his fill - a rather short-sighted economy which
often had disastrous results. His female companion was afforded the
same privilege and did not even have to waste good drinking time
playing the fiddle!".
AS DRUNK AS A FIDDLER'S BITCH. My 91 year old neighbour, who told me this expression, believes it would be the fiddler's dog. Whilst they were travelling round from pub to pub the fiddler played and the customers gave the dog a little beer. By the end of the evening the dog became a little woozy.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_do_we_say_As_Drunk_as_a_fiddler's_bitch#ixzz1AYKTQP00



"The voice of the majority is no proof of justice." - Schiller
dlux3
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 6:49:06 PM

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Tovarish wrote:
dlux, I know a limerick very similar to those very words, ha ha


Very culturally enriching that limerick is too Tov. Usually recited by imps in the company of urbane guests much to the chagrin of parents. Hurrah!

The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.
F.D.S.O.
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 4:30:19 PM

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In the south we say "drunker than cooty brown" don’t ask me who he is.

"It's not about how much you make, it's about how much you spend." -papaw-
GreenSleeves
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 4:36:49 PM
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B355E wrote:
...a skunk, because he drinks like a fish. In the spirit of holiday season, how do you drink?
Here, we say "drunk as a Russian" and I heard a rumour that Russians say "drunk as a Finn", is that true?

Hi! I heard drunk as a Pollock..
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, December 28, 2017 7:45:59 AM

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Happened to find this one, too ;-)

https://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst13446_Drunk-as---.aspx


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, December 28, 2017 8:04:21 AM
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i wanna smoke marijuana,







Y111
Posted: Thursday, December 28, 2017 12:04:42 PM
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B355E wrote:
and I heard a rumour that Russians say "drunk as a Finn", is that true?

Maybe those who live in St. Petersbourg and around it. To me Finland and Finns are like a galaxy far away. :) In old days you would be drunk as a shoemaker, and in these days drunk as a pig, probably, though there are other expressions that are harder to translate correctly. Maybe it's even impossible.
Schlook Inside
Posted: Saturday, January 6, 2018 10:09:52 PM

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French Canadian saying......saoul comme une botte (drunk as a boot)

"Be kind everyone is fighting a hard battle"
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 6:48:57 AM

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I thought to travel to Wales this spring or early summer. Now it seems all the good fun is gone, or at lest diminishing.
We have couple of streets for pub crawling here in Helsinki, but Mumbles Mile was so legendary. Sigh!
At least there are still the famous piers.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/watering-holes-notorious-mumbles-mile-2271278


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 7:56:47 AM

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JJ the Mumbles is still a very pretty place to visit and the Gower Peninsula is lovely.



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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