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One always tends to overpraise a long book because one has got through it. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 12:00:00 AM
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One always tends to overpraise a long book because one has got through it.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)
cmzeno
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 3:52:59 AM
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This is some sort of prosleptic syllogism. However, it's certainly a fallacy, equally split between cynicism and humor.
One very common, natural, yet error-prone means of psychological analysis is to relate everything to oneself. This makes me believe that Mr. Foster was forced into the burden of reading "War and Peace"... The relief of digesting it induces some feeling of accomplishment that should be shared with those who didn't have the guts to do it, right?
Well, I'm tempted to give his quote some credit, since it applies to snobs so well.
IgnorantOne
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 4:17:31 AM
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cmzeno wrote:
This is some sort of prosleptic syllogism. However, it's certainly a fallacy, equally split between cynicism and humor.
One very common, natural, yet error-prone means of psychological analysis is to relate everything to oneself. This makes me believe that Mr. Foster was forced into the burden of reading "War and Peace"... The relief of digesting it induces some feeling of accomplishment that should be shared with those who didn't have the guts to do it, right?
Well, I'm tempted to give his quote some credit, since it applies to snobs so well.


Haha, well said @cmzeno. More often than not, our [especially conclusive] assumptions about others actually tend to pronounce our own thought processes/ways more loudly than shedding objective light on the subject in question - most likely so because of the psychoanalysis err you explain.

Such 'instances' may call for popularizing the phrase "never say always."
redsxz
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 5:01:15 AM

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cmzeno wrote:
This is some sort of prosleptic syllogism. However, it's certainly a fallacy, equally split between cynicism and humor.
One very common, natural, yet error-prone means of psychological analysis is to relate everything to oneself. This makes me believe that Mr. Foster was forced into the burden of reading "War and Peace"... The relief of digesting it induces some feeling of accomplishment that should be shared with those who didn't have the guts to do it, right?
Well, I'm tempted to give his quote some credit, since it applies to snobs so well.


I don't think its a indication of himself. Its a aphorism that holds true for most as we try to justify to ourselves why we read 2000 words of possible rubbish.
pedro
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 5:01:51 AM

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I intend one day to read Marcel Proust, À la recherche du temps perdu (or rather a translation thereof) but probably won't. Best left to long distance lorry drivers with talking books.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Shadowy
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 7:22:26 AM
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E. M Forster. He looks like Hitler in the snap. Lolz. Probably that could be the reason he did not like long books. Did he like women? Hitler did not; not as much as JFK did.
MarySM
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 8:27:07 AM

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Shadowy wrote:
E. M Forster. He looks like Hitler in the snap. Lolz. Probably that could be the reason he did not like long books. Did he like women? Hitler did not; not as much as JFK did.


Several of his books are considered classics, but the only one I read was "A Passage to India." He was gay and a book he had written that was about gays was published after his death.

Welcome to the forum!

"He who never made a mistake never made a discovery." Samuel Smiles
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 8:49:26 AM
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pedro wrote:
I intend one day to read Marcel Proust, À la recherche du temps perdu (or rather a translation thereof) but probably won't. Best left to long distance lorry drivers with talking books.


I had to translate Proust in French. One whole sentence could take up four chalkboards. I can't imagine how much is lost in the translation.
pedro
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 8:54:02 AM

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ok that settles it! I won't bother with the Goethe epic either, or is German simpler?

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 11:26:26 AM
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I don't think a book's merit depends upon its length.
I have read and loved both short and long fiction and feel disappointed
when the book comes to an end.
Usually I can tell whether I am going
to enjoy a book within the first page or two.
I have read War and Peace, as well as a works by Marcel Proust, and
didn't think the length of them had any significance;
since my purpose wasn't to *finish* them...I just wanted the pleasure of *experiencing*
*reading* them… and becoming *absorbed into them.*
Not only can you not judge a book by its cover, but neither by its length.
To me, if I am going to spend
time reading, it doesn’t matter if I read three short books or one long one.
Raia Dalila
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 2:05:17 PM
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Location: Quebec-Canada
cmzeno wrote:
This is some sort of prosleptic syllogism. However, it's certainly a fallacy, equally split between cynicism and humor.
One very common, natural, yet error-prone means of psychological analysis is to relate everything to oneself. This makes me believe that Mr. Foster was forced into the burden of reading "War and Peace"... The relief of digesting it induces some feeling of accomplishment that should be shared with those who didn't have the guts to do it, right?
Well, I'm tempted to give his quote some credit, since it applies to snobs so well.

Angel Mr.cmzeno as a person with no skill in expressing herself correctly, in the English Language; may i ask for your permission to spouse your quote as my Alter? = word by word on M. Foster please?
Raia Dalila
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 2:49:02 PM
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Joined: 10/11/2010
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Location: Quebec-Canada
IgnorantOne wrote:
cmzeno wrote:
This is some sort of prosleptic syllogism. However, it's certainly a fallacy, equally split between cynicism and humor.
One very common, natural, yet error-prone means of psychological analysis is to relate everything to oneself. This makes me believe that Mr. Foster was forced into the burden of reading "War and Peace"... The relief of digesting it induces some feeling of accomplishment that should be shared with those who didn't have the guts to do it, right?
Well, I'm tempted to give his quote some credit, since it applies to snobs so well.


Haha, well said @cmzeno. More often than not, our [especially conclusive] assumptions about others actually tend to pronounce our own thought processes/ways more loudly than shedding objective light on the subject in question - most likely so because of the psychoanalysis err you explain.

Such 'instances' may call for popularizing the phrase "never say always."

Never Always The Same; indeed
Raia Dalila
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 2:53:27 PM
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Joined: 10/11/2010
Posts: 246
Neurons: 278
Location: Quebec-Canada
IgnorantOne wrote:
cmzeno wrote:
This is some sort of prosleptic syllogism. However, it's certainly a fallacy, equally split between cynicism and humor.
One very common, natural, yet error-prone means of psychological analysis is to relate everything to oneself. This makes me believe that Mr. Foster was forced into the burden of reading "War and Peace"... The relief of digesting it induces some feeling of accomplishment that should be shared with those who didn't have the guts to do it, right?
Well, I'm tempted to give his quote some credit, since it applies to snobs so well.


Haha, well said @cmzeno. More often than not, our [especially conclusive] assumptions about others actually tend to pronounce our own thought processes/ways more loudly than shedding objective light on the subject in question - most likely so because of the psychoanalysis err you explain.

Such 'instances' may call for popularizing the phrase "never say always."

Never Always The Same; indeed
Raia Dalila
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 3:22:42 PM
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Joined: 10/11/2010
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Location: Quebec-Canada
I wish to errace;indeed. There is a old -citation! Dicton in French from witch the word Dictionary derive- ''never say never''- that is why i apologise for the Indeed.
Babezy
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 7:21:25 PM

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I definitely second Marissa L's comments. Don't miss a good book because it's long!

This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force. --Dorothy Parker
excaelis
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 8:17:01 PM

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Length isn't everything.

Sanity is not statistical
Babezy
Posted: Monday, December 6, 2010 8:47:36 PM

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I actually rewrote that post because it said "size doesn't matter" even more than the one I ended up with (and yes, I'll end a sentence with a prep if I want to!). But finally I gave up and hoped no one would notice the length remark...

This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force. --Dorothy Parker
jcbarros
Posted: Friday, December 24, 2010 10:33:33 AM

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I dont think Foster resembles Hitler. AH was not so ugly. Anyway, A passage to India is better than Mein Kampf.
GabhSigenod
Posted: Friday, December 24, 2010 12:39:11 PM

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My goats wont let me read...

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
man in black
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 11:10:31 AM

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It is easier to qualify as unreadable what we read than admit our capacity to understand it. Books exist only for the sake of a few phrases that if not clothed by a story would make its author blush or publish just a leaflet instead.

look into my eyeballs, there thy beauty lies, then why not lips on lips since eyes on eyes? William Shakespeare
man in black
Posted: Friday, January 7, 2011 11:12:59 AM

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Joined: 10/20/2009
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Location: Cuba
It is easier to qualify as unreadable what we read than admit our incapacity to understand it. Books exist only for the sake of a few phrases that if not clothed by a story would make its author blush or publish just a leaflet instead.

look into my eyeballs, there thy beauty lies, then why not lips on lips since eyes on eyes? William Shakespeare
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