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His act is really annoying Options
tommaso
Posted: Tuesday, August 25, 2015 11:42:27 PM
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He likes to speed loud in the office.
His act is really annoying/disgusting.

How do we say the feeling not like the way he does?
Passion for phonics
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 1:17:45 AM
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He likes to speed loud in the office.
He likes to speak loudly in the office.

His act is really annoying/disgusting.
I suggest changing to:
His behavior is really annoying/disgusting.
Either “annoying” or “disgusting” works here, however you word it.
Rajinder Tyagi
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 1:26:04 AM

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[quote=tommaso]He likes to speed loud in the office.
His act is really annoying/disgusting.

How do we say the feeling not like the way he does?

In sentence 1, “He likes to speak loud in the office.” The key is “speak how?”. The answer to “how?” is provided by an adverb. “Loud” is an adjective. In the given sentence, it needs to be replaced by its adverb form. There are two forms: loudly and aloud. Before deciding which is better, there is a need to be clear on their use. “Loud” means making a lot of noise. It is the opposite of quiet. It implies that the noise is unpleasant to the ears in terms of intensity/volume. This situation occurs when the noise is deafening, ear-splitting, thunderous etc. “Loud”, as an adjective, is generally used before a noun or after a “to be” verb. The adverb “loudly” conveys the same meaning. It is however used when an adverb is required. The adjective and adverb form do not replace each other in grammar. The adverb “aloud” is use when you wish to refer to speech so that people can hear you [= out loud] while laughing, reading, something etc. It is not annoying or disgusting. In the given sentence “speed loud” needs to be corrected to “speak loudly” because the sound is annoying/disgusting/thundering.
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 2:04:36 AM

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Rajinder Tyagi wrote:
Loud”, as an adjective,


This dictionary
is one of many that says that loud', meaning 'in a loud manner' can be used as an adverb.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 2:13:23 AM

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As my mother used to say:

"Oh, for cryin' out loud!"
LucOneOff
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 3:39:20 AM

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For Tunafi: I followed the link you posted and I found the dictionary page you suggested, but I found that in regular cases loud is the adjedctive and loudly is the adverbial form, but if you use a sentence as 'in a loud manner', in that case you have an adverbial idioms, but loud is the adjective referred to the word manner.
India271
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 4:18:15 AM

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Simply press the ignore button.
Warped
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 9:01:55 AM
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Speak loud is colloquial and wrong in formal English. One might as well say Drive slow when, in fact, the more correct way of saying it would be Drive slowly.
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 9:26:19 AM

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LucOneOff wrote:
I found that in regular cases loud is the adjedctive and loudly is the adverbial form, but if you use a sentence as 'in a loud manner', in that case you have an adverbial idioms, but loud is the adjective referred to the word manner.


'In a loud manner' was the dictionary's definition of the adverb 'loud'.

Rajinder Tyagi
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 12:17:26 PM

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tunaafi wrote:
Rajinder Tyagi wrote:
Loud”, as an adjective,


This dictionary
is one of many that says that loud', meaning 'in a loud manner' can be used as an adverb.


For tunaffi and other readers:

I'm reproducing the text from Oxford Advance Learner's Dictionary:
loud·ly adverb:She screamed as loudly as she could.
adverb
(loud·er, loud·est) (informal) in a way that makes a lot of noise or can be easily heard SYN  loudly:Do you have to play that music so loud? Ç You’ll have to speak louder—I can’t hear you.

It is apparent, that the correct adverb is "loudly". In informal speech, people do use "loud". Such usage is best avoided. It is better to use the conventional formal language. At the risk of making the discussion more abstruse, readers are advised to differentiate between direct and directly and thereafter decide if 'direct' is also used as an adjective.
In the phrase 'in a loud manner' "loud" is an adjective. "In a loud manner" is an adverb phrase. There are certain verbs after which the standard adverb e.g. calmly, is not used. Instead of the adverb "calmly" we need to use the adverb phrase "in a calm manner". Incidentally, this technique is also adopted when there is confusion on adverb form. "in a/an + adjective + manner" circumvents the problem of not being sure of the correct adverb.

Readers can decide what they wish to adopt in their speech. Thanks.
coag
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 12:29:23 PM

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The Webster listed "loud" explicitly as an adverb.

There is a Webster Yutube video that I find interesting with regard to this question. The video title is "Drive Safe: In Praise of Flat Adverbs". I thought the video might be interesting to other forum users.
NKM
Posted: Thursday, August 27, 2015 4:47:23 PM

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Certainly "loud" belongs to the category of "flat" adverbs, at least for some purposes.

In all my years as a musician I've never been asked to "play loudly" or "more loudly," nor accused of "playing too loudly."
Nor have I ever heard anyone tell a singer to "sing loudly" (or "not so loudly").

In cases like these, "loud" is universally accepted as the correct (standard) adverb.

Of course the "flat" form is normally used after the verb it modifies.
- "We all sang as loud as we could." - but - "We loudly sang the parts we knew."

tommaso
Posted: Thursday, August 27, 2015 9:14:41 PM
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Rajinder Tyagi wrote:
[quote=tommaso]He likes to speed loud in the office.
His act is really annoying/disgusting.

How do we say the feeling not like the way he does?

In sentence 1, “He likes to speak loud in the office.” The key is “speak how?”. The answer to “how?” is provided by an adverb. “Loud” is an adjective. In the given sentence, it needs to be replaced by its adverb form. There are two forms: loudly and aloud. Before deciding which is better, there is a need to be clear on their use. “Loud” means making a lot of noise. It is the opposite of quiet. It implies that the noise is unpleasant to the ears in terms of intensity/volume. This situation occurs when the noise is deafening, ear-splitting, thunderous etc. “Loud”, as an adjective, is generally used before a noun or after a “to be” verb. The adverb “loudly” conveys the same meaning. It is however used when an adverb is required. The adjective and adverb form do not replace each other in grammar. The adverb “aloud” is use when you wish to refer to speech so that people can hear you [= out loud] while laughing, reading, something etc. It is not annoying or disgusting. In the given sentence “speed loud” needs to be corrected to “speak loudly” because the sound is annoying/disgusting/thundering.


Thanks.
NKM
Posted: Friday, August 28, 2015 3:21:58 PM

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Strangely enough, it seems that one "speaks loudly" but "talks loud."

And one may "drive slow" but "proceed slowly."

- These are observations of widespread acceptance, not claims of correctness. Those flat forms are not (yet) considered "standard."

══════════════════════════════════

All too many people tend to sing flat.
Sometimes they overcompensate and start to sing sharp.

Either way the result is out of tune, and quite unpleasant.

- Note that "flat" and "sharp" are the only acceptable forms for this use. "Flatly" and "sharply" would not convey the appropriate meanings.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, August 29, 2015 6:39:37 AM

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Rajinder Tyagi wrote:
In informal speech, people do use "loud". Such usage is best avoided.

I'm afraid I disagree with this sentiment.

Though Rajinder's explanations and knowledge of formal grammar are very good, this is not the way people speak.

Informal speech is the way people speak.
"Slang" is a specialised form of language used in certain groups and time periods.
"Formal English" is exactly what it says, a specialised form of English for formal occasions.
"Informal English" is normal English - that which is usually spoken, not in specifically set-aside times or company.
As NKM says, "In all my years as a musician I've never been asked to "play loudly" or "more loudly," nor accused of "playing too loudly."
Nor have I ever heard anyone tell a singer to "sing loudly" (or "not so loudly").

In cases like these, "loud" is universally accepted as the correct (standard) adverb.
"

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary wrote:
loud adverb
BrE; NAmE
(louder, loudest) (informal) in a way that makes a lot of noise or can be easily heard
synonym loudly
Do you have to play that music so loud?
You'll have to speak louder—I can't hear you.
She screamed loud enough to wake the dead.
actions speak louder than words
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