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The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it. Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC)
Joy Frohlich
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 2:27:16 AM
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In war, the general who orders a retreat ensures many of his men will live to fight another day. Otherwise, there may be purely a pyrrhic victory if there is a victory at all.
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 3:32:46 AM

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Daemon wrote:
The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC)



Something of a tautology. It is better that a man is not shot in the head than that he is.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
JMV
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 4:16:33 AM

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Hopefully it didn't take him too long to come up with that profound pearl of wisdom. Anxious

I'd file that one under No Duh!, but that's just me.
dahmed63
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 5:26:27 AM

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I think what he meant that sometimes it's a bravery to run from a losing battle. He might be able to win tomorrow after well preparation.
dahmed63
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 5:27:28 AM

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I think what he meant that sometimes it's a bravery to run from a losing battle. He might be able to win tomorrow after well preparation.
Anthony7877
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 5:50:16 AM

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TFD should really include the context of their quotes. In what situation in Homer's works does this line appear? All these pseudo-intellectuals like to add snide responses, not knowing that the quote may in fact come from one of the author's bad' characters, or a character who does not truly represent the author's point of view.
Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 7:42:32 AM
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Though not everyone can outrun a disaster...
Miriam...
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 10:14:19 AM

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I thought I would post the etymology of the word 'disaster', taken from Wikipedia, since I thought it was interesting.

The word disaster is derived from Middle French désastre and that from Old Italian disastro, which in turn comes from the Ancient Greek pejorative prefix δυσ-, (dus-) "bad"[4] and ἀστήρ (aster), "star".[5] The root of the word disaster ("bad star" in Greek) comes from an astrological sense of a calamity blamed on the position of planets.

So, if the stars are not spinning in their orbits right for you,
there is not much one can do if an ill wind blows, but to take shelter. What chances do you have against the heavens?:)
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 2:37:43 PM

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Quote from: the Iliad - Book XVI Pag 81 ( Translation by Alexander Pope )

The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it. ( traslation by Lattimore )

It is King Agamemnon who uttered the quote and is harshly rebuked by Odysseus (Ulysses):


To him the monarch: "That our army bends,
That Troy triumphant our high fleet ascends,
And that the rampart, late our surest trust
And best defence, lies smoking in the dust;
All this from Jove's afflictive hand we bear,
Who, far from Argos, wills our ruin here.
Past are the days when happier Greece was blest,
And all his favour, all his aid confess'd;
Now heaven averse, our hands from battle ties,
And lifts the Trojan glory to the skies.
Cease we at length to waste our blood in vain,
And launch what ships lie nearest to the main;
Leave these at anchor, till the coming night:
Then, if impetuous Troy forbear the fight,
Bring all to sea, and hoist each sail for flight.
Better from evils, well foreseen, to run,
Than perish in the danger we may shun."


Thus he. The sage Ulysses thus replies,
While anger flash'd from his disdainful eyes:
"What shameful words (unkingly as thou art)
Fall from that trembling tongue and timorous heart?
Oh were thy sway the curse of meaner powers,
And thou the shame of any host but ours!
A host, by Jove endued with martial might,
And taught to conquer, or to fall in fight:
Adventurous combats and bold wars to wage,
Employ'd our youth, and yet employs our age.
And wilt thou thus desert the Trojan plain?
And have whole streams of blood been spilt in vain?
In such base sentence if thou couch thy fear,
Speak it in whispers, lest a Greek should hear.
Lives there a man so dead to fame, who dares
To think such meanness, or the thought declares?
And comes it even from him whose sovereign sway
The banded legions of all Greece obey?
Is this a general's voice that calls to flight,
While war hangs doubtful, while his soldiers fight?
What more could Troy? What yet their fate denies
Thou givest the foe: all Greece becomes their prize.
No more the troops (our hoisted sails in view,
Themselves abandon'd) shall the fight pursue;
But thy ships flying, with despair shall see;
And owe destruction to a prince like thee."

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6130/6130-pdf.pdf
gerry
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 3:41:25 PM
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No need to elaborate on this very basic
pag asa
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 4:41:36 PM

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There will lessons to learn from it.
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, August 5, 2015 12:49:05 AM
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Daemon wrote:
The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC)


The man does even better who does not invite disaster.
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