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"Darling" - Dutch term of endearment Options
Lire A Haute Voix
Posted: Saturday, August 14, 2010 11:19:47 PM

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I need a term of endearment, in Dutch, that a father-figure would use for his "daughter". So far I found "schatje" and "lief/liefje", but I get the feeling that these are more boyfriend-to-girlfriend words.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

“But I have no idea how to fight.” “You stab people. They die. You’ll pick up on it quick, kid."
yongxin
Posted: Sunday, August 15, 2010 11:35:20 AM
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'Schatje' and 'lief/liefje' (also liefie) are indeed words that would be used for a partner. You could use 'lieverd', looks like lief/liefje, but it does apply.
Lire A Haute Voix
Posted: Monday, August 16, 2010 8:23:41 PM

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Awesome, thank you. Just to clarify, a man of about 60 calling a woman of about 20 'lieverd' would be considered affectionate, not creepy? Thanks again.

“But I have no idea how to fight.” “You stab people. They die. You’ll pick up on it quick, kid."
Klaas V
Posted: Tuesday, August 17, 2010 6:33:34 AM

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Except age difference there is regional difference. In the Dutch speaking part of Belgium "lief" is very common. In Netherlands "schat" is (at least was) the most common, I guess.

To say "lieverd" to a girl 40 year younger than yourself sounds weird, but that may be just me. In this case <b>I</b> would use "schatje".

With maybe the exception of the unasked there just isn't such thing available as a dumb question - Z4us
Lire A Haute Voix
Posted: Tuesday, August 17, 2010 9:05:59 AM

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I guess I'll stick with schatje, then. It's like saying "darling" or "dear", right? Thanks so much.

“But I have no idea how to fight.” “You stab people. They die. You’ll pick up on it quick, kid."
yongxin
Posted: Friday, August 20, 2010 12:10:32 PM
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Schatje is not really the word I would use!! You could use 'lieve schat' or what I suggested above ('lieverd'). 'schatje' is something you say to your partner Shame on you
Michael J.W. Beijer
Posted: Sunday, August 22, 2010 6:13:55 PM
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Lire A Haute Voix wrote:
I need a term of endearment, in Dutch, that a father-figure would use for his "daughter". So far I found "schatje" and "lief/liefje", but I get the feeling that these are more boyfriend-to-girlfriend words.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!


I would suggest "meisje" (girl, or little girl). A real Dutch father might call his daughter this.

"Schat" is for girlfriends, wives, and is somewhat similar to calling a woman "honey" in English, not really what a father-figure would want to call his "daughter". If you were to offer us some more details as to the exact nature of the relationship I'm certain we could offer you more help.

Michael

David de Beer
Posted: Thursday, August 26, 2010 6:54:29 AM
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Location: Netherlands
As written earlier, there are big regional differences. In the Amsterdam area it may happen that relative strangers like your regular shop assistant, someone you meet on the street asking directions, the tram driver, addresses you as 'schat' or 'lieverd'. Both terms would certainly be used in a father to daughter conversation. The above mentioned 'meisje' might well be used in that context too, but 'meissie' (or 'meisie', neither spelling is official) is a bit more common, more affectionate. When the conversation has a correctional context 'meisje' can be used to create a distance, 'meissie' keeps the affection.
kamalraj
Posted: Thursday, August 26, 2010 6:58:50 AM

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Life partner,dude....etc

வாழ்க தமிழ்! வளர்க எம் மக்கள்
Lire A Haute Voix
Posted: Sunday, September 05, 2010 1:41:28 PM

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Thanks very much for your help, everyone.

Michael J.W. Beijer wrote:


I would suggest "meisje" (girl, or little girl). A real Dutch father might call his daughter this.

"Schat" is for girlfriends, wives, and is somewhat similar to calling a woman "honey" in English, not really what a father-figure would want to call his "daughter". If you were to offer us some more details as to the exact nature of the relationship I'm certain we could offer you more help.

Michael



To give you a bit more context, this takes place in 1702. The man is in his early sixties and the woman is a nun in her early 20s. They, along with a group of other people, are boarding in the same house for a certain amount of time. As they grow closer, I want to show my readers that he regards her almost as he would a daughter... so would "meisje" still be appropriate here?

Thanks again!

“But I have no idea how to fight.” “You stab people. They die. You’ll pick up on it quick, kid."
Appelsap
Posted: Tuesday, September 07, 2010 10:08:46 AM
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The context here seems quite relevant.
The word 'Meisje' is derived from 'meid' (=maiden/maid), which in turn comes from 'maagd' (=virgin). It was commonly used to refer to young girls, and as a referral to daughters (in the same way the word 'girl' can be used to tell you have a daughter: I have two boys and a girl).
The word 'liefje' is derived from 'lief' (=love) and was certainly then more associated with a lover/partner.
'Lieverd' is used to address someone kindly as a loving, caring person, and would certainly be appropriate for a father to say to his daughter, but when addressing a stranger gets a different connotation.

I suppose both 'meisje' and 'lieverd' can be appropriate, depending on the message it is you want to convey. The first (meisje) will accentuate there is a distance (as in father-daughter like distance). The last (lieverd) will be more affectionate, as you would lovingly address your daughter. Whether or not it would have been appropriate to address non-family like that in 1702 I cannot say.

You were looking for affectionate, so 'lieverd' would seem the better choice. Whether or not a 60 year old saying 'lieverd' (very equal to 'darling') to a 20 year old is 'creepy' as you put it (in 1702!) is something for you to judge - that really depends on how well they know each other. :)
Lire A Haute Voix
Posted: Tuesday, September 07, 2010 11:07:33 AM

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I think I will use "meisje", then. It seems safe -- obviously he's showing that he esteems her as more than just an acquaintence, but he's not suggesting that they spend the rest of their lives together or anything.

Thank you so much, to everyone, for all your very helpful replies. :D

“But I have no idea how to fight.” “You stab people. They die. You’ll pick up on it quick, kid."
Bart
Posted: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 2:19:12 PM
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I wouldn't have any problem at all with "schatje" but I'd use "meiske" instead of "meisje." My preference there is probably because of the regional lingo/dialect where I grew up - "meisje" would not be incorrect.

May your moments of need be met by moments of compassion
Klaas V
Posted: Wednesday, December 22, 2010 4:22:13 AM

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Thank you, Bart! You sound like coming from the southern part of Netherlands [etymologically: (the) Low Countries] {ref it. Paesi Bassi}

Only in Utrecht you may say 'wijffie' - talking about regional differences...

With maybe the exception of the unasked there just isn't such thing available as a dumb question - Z4us
gittav
Posted: Wednesday, January 04, 2012 11:18:45 AM

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I think we can conclude from the above, that it is all very subjective.

In my family we tend not to use "schatje", because it would rather sound you're addressing a lover or it would be a way for teenagers to address close friends.

My dad often refers to me as "meisje" or "lieverd" and I would not say the first shows any emotional distance. It is of course all about how someone says it.
I would go for "meisje" (which is the official Dutch word for (little) girl (literally, little maid). "Meiske" is common in southern dialects and Flemish. Or "lieverd" (which means lovely-one, dear-one, so similar to sweetie and darling).

I've heard "wijffie" being used outside of Utrecht as well (still in that province though). But it implies an intimate relation e.g. father-daughter, or two close friends (often teenagers).
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, January 04, 2012 11:30:40 AM

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If she's a nun in her early twenties, wouldn't 'zus' or 'zusje' be more appropriate?

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
seemo74
Posted: Saturday, May 10, 2014 5:45:19 PM

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Danke !
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