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'Personal titles' and 'job titles' Options
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 12:00:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,129
Neurons: 25,822
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
A cooperator wrote:

Thanks a lot, LeonAzul,
First of all, I noticed that you have capitalized the first letter of 'Doctorate', which make me get asking myself why?
I think if the full degree name was stated, then we must have capitalized all the first letters of the degree name, like a Doctorate's Degree in Computer Science, a Master's Degree in Computer Science, a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science.


Sorry if that caused any confusion. I admit that my use of capitalization is not always standard. In this case I intended to refer to any specific degree within the class of degrees that includes Ph.D., LL.D., etc.

The standard in the USA is to refer to a Ph.D., M.S., or B.S. in Computer Science (CS).

A cooperator wrote:

Secondly: Who do you mean with 'latter' in your statement "although the latter can refer to someone who is well-advanced in their doctoral program.". Do you mean with 'latter' with "[a] Professor"?
I don't think an "Associate Professor= Co-professor" is often interchangeable with an "Assistant Professor" since an "Assistant Professor" is a lower ranking than an "Associate Professor= Co-Professor", which, itself, is a lower ranking than a "Professor".


One point you should understand through this thread is that these titles are not necessarily hierarchical, nor are they standardized from country to country, state to state, or even among different schools.

The titles are not necessarily logical, but rather traditional according to the location and type of college or university. The only consistency is that a full professor with tenure has either earned one or more doctorates, or has been granted an honorary degree in order to qualify for the position.

A cooperator wrote:

Finally: As Drag0nspeaker, mentioned that "Head of Computer Science Department" is equivalent to a director"
I read that "A job title can describe the responsibilities of the position, the level of the job, or both. For example, job titles that include the terms executive, manager, director, chief, supervisor, etc. are typically used for management jobs.
Thus, even if the Head of Computer Science Department is an assistant instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, or professor, then "the Head of the Computer Science Department" would still be equivalent to "the Director of the Computer Science Department"?


Not necessarily. The position of director is usually administrative, and so experience in running a school is often more important than experience actually teaching for such a position.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 7:36:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,428
Neurons: 8,838
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
leonAzul wrote:
Quote:
Sorry if that caused any confusion. I admit that my use of capitalization is not always standard. In this case I intended to refer to any specific degree within the class of degrees that includes Ph.D., LL.D., etc.

The standard in the USA is to refer to a Ph.D., M.S., or B.S. in Computer Science (CS).


Thank you very much indeed, LeonAzul,
(LL.D.; Doctor of Law in English) or a Doctorate's Degree in Law is a doctorate-level academic degree in law, or an honorary doctorate, depending on the jurisdiction.
(LL.M.; Master of Law in English) Or a Master's Degree in Law.
However, I don't know for what 'LL.D' or 'LL.M.' stands?
Also, you think I cannot say 'a Ph.D., M., or B. in Law( in the standard in the USA) or Doctorate's Degree in Law, Master's Degree in Law, or Bachelor's degree in Law(in the standards in other countries.). Thus, no need to say 'LL.D.; LL.M.; or LL.B.

leonAzul wrote:
Quote:


A cooperator wrote:
Quote:
Finally: As Drag0nspeaker, mentioned that "Head of Computer Science Department" is equivalent to a director"
I read that "A job title can describe the responsibilities of the position, the level of the job, or both. For example, job titles that include the terms executive, manager, director, chief, supervisor, etc. are typically used for management jobs.
Thus, even if the Head of Computer Science Department is an assistant instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, or professor, then "the Head of the Computer Science Department" would still be equivalent to "the Director of the Computer Science Department"?


Not necessarily. The position of director is usually administrative, and so experience in running a school is often more important than experience actually teaching for such a position.


Here I intended to know if a professor was appointed as the director/head of a department at a college, or as the dean/head/manager of a college or even the rictor of a university, then s/he would be still titled as a director/ manager/ rector in his/her job title, although s(he) has still been/was teaching staff. If yes, then I would be confused about titling the teaching staff still teaching in the teaching professions and teaching staff becoming managing management jobs since, as said, I read that job titles that include the terms executive, manager, director, chief, supervisor, etc. are typically used for management jobs, and not teaching jobs.

Moreover,
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Quote:
Your referee has the post/position/job of "Head of Computer Science Department", which is an assistant to the Professor (the Head of the College of Sciences).
"Head of Computer Science Department" is equivalent to a director (director n
3. (Professions) a person who directs the affairs of an institution, trust, educational programme, etc
) as he directs the educational programme "Computer Science".

The Head of the College of Sciences is equivalent to a manager (manager n
1. (Professions) a person who directs or manages an organization, industry, shop, etc
) as he manages the whole College.
professor n
1. (Education) the principal lecturer or teacher in a field of learning at a university or college; a holder of a university chair

(All the coloured definitions are from the Collins English Dictionary)


Thus, could you please address these points below::
Firstly: what do you think that Drag0nspeaker meant with the "The Head of the College of Sciences", which is equivalent to a manager, as he manages the whole College? Did he mean with "The Head of the College of Sciences" with "the dean of a college, in which there are many science departments. Thus, the head/manager/dean of the College of Sciences" has a higher position than "the head/director of a department"?

Secondly: Drag0nspeaker had said "professor[/b] n - 1. (Education) the principal lecturer or teacher in a field of learning at a university or college; a holder of a university chair"
But, I think some professors are appointed as the heads of a departments, deans of colleges, the vice-rectors of the academic affairs, the vice-rectors of the students affairs, or even the rectors of universities although all those job titles are only managment jobs, and not teaching jobs/academic teaching appointments. Thus, why do you think a professor must only be "the principal lecturer or teacher in a field of learning at a university...."


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, October 07, 2017 5:10:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,129
Neurons: 25,822
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
A cooperator wrote:

But, I think some professors are appointed as the heads of a departments, deans of colleges, the vice-rectors of the academic affairs, the vice-rectors of the students affairs, or even the rectors of universities although all those job titles are only managment jobs, and not teaching jobs/academic teaching appointments. Thus, why do you think a professor must only be "the principal lecturer or teacher in a field of learning at a university...."


Whatever you think doesn't matter. What matters is what actually takes place in any particular university.
Think


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
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