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does she love me
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:41:07 PM

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The man's statement was entirely sound, with no purchase for rebuttal at all.
He thought the whole situation as normal and had no purchase to question it

After reading these, I was curious if purchase is used correctly in the context either as an expression or if anyone has heard sentences alike before?
NKM
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:50:30 PM

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TFD offers the following definition of "purchase" as a noun:
- A hold or position that allows the application of power, as in moving something.

Thus: "no basis for rebuttal" and "no likelihood of success in trying to question it".

does she love me
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:55:30 PM

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Perfect, appreciate the time!
NELDCES
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 7:50:19 PM
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Purchase (n)


I hardly seem to use this word to describe one thing I did while practicing my English.


I used to say that we need to keep our receipt as a proof of purchase.


Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 4:43:26 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ah! - A completely different meaning of the word.

You are ALSO correct.

'Purchase' (noun) means 'something you have bought' or 'the act of buying'.

'Purchase' (noun) means 'a grip', 'a hold', 'a position from which to apply effort'.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 12:19:48 PM

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The two apparently different meanings are actually logically linked.

Latin captare, - to capture, chase, go after -
modern French pourchasser to pursue; to chase

Anglo-French brought the meaning of 'pursue, gain, obtain' into English - but not by paying for it!
English
Quote:
purchase - c. 1300, "acquisition, gain;" also, "something acquired or received, a possession; property, goods;" especially "booty, spoil; goods gained by pillage or robbery" (to make purchase was "to seize by robbery").
Also "mercenary soldier, one who fights for booty."


Then the 'effort' began to mean you payed money for it!
Quote:
Originally to obtain or receive as due in any way, including through merit or suffering; specific sense of "acquire for money, pay money for, buy" is from mid-14c., though the word continued to be used for "to get by conquest in war, obtain as booty" up to 17c.


So, however you did it, you have got hold of something. And you keep hold...
Quote:
The sense of "hold or position for advantageously applying power" (1711) is extended from the nautical verb meaning "to haul or draw (especially by mechanical power)," often used in reference to hauling up anchors, attested from 1560s.




making modern English noun purchase - grip, traction









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