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To sudy in absentia Options
Luker4
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 10:24:57 AM

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Joined: 11/19/2013
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Location: Wrocław Pracze, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland
Hello, good evening :)

How would you call a student who only attends school at weekends

internet tells me it is "a student in absentia" Think Think

thar
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 4:43:49 PM

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Sounds dodgy to me. 'In absentia' means not being there. Being there on weekends doesn't really count!

If you are studying somewhere else, then maybe. But not at another time.

I feels wrong because 'in absentia' is something you do to them while they are absent. It is not something they do while they are not here.
And if they are in school on weekends, they are not absent!

Most often the phrase is used for people tried in absentia - when they are not in court because they have fled, but you try them anyway (and I am sure get a high conviction rate!) Whistle

I would call them part-time students who study on weekends.

Quote:
Etymology
Borrowing from Latin in + absentia (“absence”).

Prepositional phrase
in absentia

(law) While not present; while absent
The defendant was convicted in absentia after fleeing during the trial.
Translations
while not present


I can't state categorically the phrase isn't used. And if you found it, there must be a source. all I can say is it doesn't seem to meke sense for that usage.
srirr
Posted: Sunday, September 24, 2017 12:24:21 AM

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Location: Delhi, NCT, India
Yes, I have seen this term being used in legal procedures like court hearings or in professional meetings. But in academics, and that too for a student who attends classes on weekends, "in absentia" does not sound apt.

To OP, How would you call a student who only attends school at weekends?
Such classes, occurring only on weekends, are often called weekend classes. The students for these classes can be termed as 'weekend students' but I am not sure whether this is a common term or not, although this can be understood.




We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
mactoria
Posted: Sunday, September 24, 2017 2:13:08 AM
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Joined: 8/13/2014
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Location: Stockton, California, United States
Luker4 wrote:
Hello, good evening :)

How would you call a student who only attends school at weekends

internet tells me it is "a student in absentia" Think Think



Lukers: I'm not sure there is a separate other term for students who attend school on weekends, at least that I've read or heard. Not sure about all countries, but weekend college programs aren't that uncommon in the US, particularly in certain programs e.g. masters level management program. I've known a number of persons, colleagues in my field of human services, who got their masters degrees by attending a program "x" number of weekends for "y" numbers of months or years. It's one option that some colleges/universities offer for people who work during the week, perhaps even long hours or different shifts that make night programs impossible.

So maybe there is a separate word or phrase to describe students who attend college programs on the weekends, but I think it's fair to just say they are attending a weekend college program for a "x" degree.
srirr
Posted: Sunday, September 24, 2017 2:39:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 5,511
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Location: Delhi, NCT, India
Mactoria, on a second thought, it came to my mind that we can see this with two angles. One, students attending the weekend programmes or classes. And second can be students who are enrolled in regular programmes, but due to some reasons they attend the classes only on weekends. For the second category, it is not wise to say 'attending a weekend programme'. What say?



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Luker4
Posted: Sunday, September 24, 2017 3:26:33 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/19/2013
Posts: 4,152
Neurons: 22,085
Location: Wrocław Pracze, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland
Ok I know what's going on now :)

"Part-time student" - yes that is what I was looking for. I just don't know why my dictionary App or google gave me only "In abesntia".

When I think of it now I understand. Polish word "zaoczny" means "behind the eye" so "not seen" so "In absentia"

but we say "student zaoczny" meaning part time weekend student and it's a very common phrase which dicionaries apparently confuse.

We also say "wyrok zaoczny" meaning a sentence in Absentia.


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