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became: action or linking Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 3:05:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 779
Neurons: 4,384
The horse became famous overnight.”


https://bestgedclasses.org/action-verbs-and-linking-verbs /

Is "became" an action verb as the sentence doesn't make sense after replacing it with equal sign?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 5:01:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,710
Neurons: 144,725
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I would say that it IS a 'linking verb'.

Linking verbs do not always mean "equals". There are different definitions.
You need to see what YOUR grammar-lessons say.

"I smelled fresh bread" is not a dynamic verb, but it is not the same as "I equal fresh bread."

There are different definitions:
The Farlex Thesaurus says that linking verbs (copulas) are 'equating verbs'.
The Collins Dictionary says that they identify the subject or link the subject and predicate.

*********
Some grammars separate 'linking verbs' and 'action verbs' - but other grammars separate 'dynamic verbs'(action verbs) and 'stative verbs'.
Some grammars say that 'copulas' and 'stative verbs' are the same, others say that 'copulas' and 'linking verbs' are the same.

These are not the same, though they have similar meanings.

Some grammars say that you can have dynamic linking verbs.

Your GED site separates the two subjects well:
Quote:
Then, you have verbs that convey a state of being, such as “to have“, or “to be“.
Then, you have linking verbs. We call them linking verbs because what they do is they link the subject to additional info.


The Farlex Grammar says that "become" is a linking verb.

Linking verbs vs. action verbs
The verbs be, seem, and become are always used as linking verbs (except when be is an auxiliary verb, as we looked at already). However, the other linking verbs all have the capacity to behave as action verbs in a sentence. Sometimes it is tricky to know whether a verb is functioning as a linking verb or as an action verb, but there are ways that we can be sure.


MY test for linking verbs is "Does the predicate describe the subject?"
The horse is described as famous. So the verb is a linking verb.

"Become" is not a stative verb it is a dynamic verb - it shows a CHANGE of state.

The horse changed state from being 'not-famous' to 'famous'.

MY 'test' for stative/dynamic is just logical, not grammatical "Is the subject (and the object if there is one) in the same state at the start and end of the sentence?"

I kicked the ball. - the ball changes direction (or starts moving) - dynamic verb
I understand French. - "I" and "French" do not change - stative verb
The horse is famous. - The horse does not change - stative verb
The horse became famous. - the state changes - dynamic verb


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 7:47:09 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 4,244
Neurons: 730,733
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I would say that it IS a 'linking verb'.


Yes, definitely a linking verb.

Other examples of linking verbs:

The horse got tired.
The horse turned nasty.
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