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The soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order. Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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The soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)
zina antoaneta
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 4:46:38 AM

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The cowards' excuse!
"I just followed orders", was the justification of the Nazi war criminals at the 1945-1946 Nuremberg trial.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 9:17:33 AM

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Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de
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Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de (sərvăn`tēz, Span. mēgĕl` dā thĕrvän`tās sä'ävāthrä), 1547–1616, Spanish novelist, dramatist, and poet, author of Don Quixote de la Mancha, b. Alcalá de Henares.
Life

Little is known of Cervantes's youth. He went to Italy (1569), where, in the service of a cardinal, he studied Italian literature and philosophy, which were later to influence his work. In 1570 he enlisted in the army and fought in the naval battle of Lepanto (1571), receiving a wound that permanently crippled his left arm. While returning to Spain in 1575 he was captured by Barbary pirates and was sold as a slave; he eventually became the property of the viceroy of Algiers. After many attempted escapes, he was ransomed in 1580, at a cost that brought financial ruin to himself and to his family. As a government purchasing agent in Seville (1588–97), Cervantes proved less than successful; his unbusinesslike methods resulted in deficits, and he was imprisoned several times.
Works

His first published work was an effusive pastoral romance in prose and verse, La Galatea (1585). Between 1582 and 1587 he wrote more than 20 plays, only two of which survive. He was 58 when Part I of his masterpiece, Don Quixote (1605; Part II, 1615), was published. As a superb burlesque of the popular romances of chivalry, Don Quixote was an enormous and immediate success. A spurious Part II was published in 1614, probably spurring Cervantes to complete the work.

Don Quixote is considered a profound delineation of two conflicting attitudes toward the world: idealism and realism. The work has been appreciated as a satire on unrealistic extremism, an exposition of the tragedy of idealism in a corrupt world, and a plea for widespread reform. Whatever its intended emphasis, the work presented to the world an unforgettable description of the transforming power of illusion, and it has had an indelible effect on the development of the European novel.

Don Quixote is a country gentleman who has read too many chivalric romances. He and the peasant Sancho Panza, who serves as his squire, set forth on a series of extravagant adventures. The whole fabric of 16th-century Spanish society is detailed with piercing yet sympathetic insight. The addled idealism of Don Quixote and the earthy acquisitiveness of Sancho serve as catalysts for numerous humorous and pathetic exploits and incidents. Its panorama of characters, the excellence of its tales, and its vivid portrayal of human nature contribute to the enduring influence of Don Quixote.

In later years Cervantes wrote other works of fiction, including Novelas ejemplares (1613), 12 original tales of piracy, Gypsies, and human passions, drawn from his own experience and molded by his mature craftsmanship. Some of these stories in themselves prove him to be one of the world's great literary masters.
Bibliography

Among the most acclaimed translations of Don Quixote are those by S. Putman (1949), J. M. Cohen (1950), and E. Grossman (2003). See biographies by L. Astrana Marín (in Spanish, 7 vol., 1948–58), F. Díaz Plaja (tr. 1970), and W. Byron (1988); studies by L. Nelson (1969), A. K. Forcione (1982), J. G. Weiger (3 vol., 1979–88), C. B. Johnson (1983), I. Stavans (2015), and W. Egginton (2016); bibliography by D. B. Drake (1980).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

with my pleasure
ibj_ldn
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 9:38:03 AM

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"The soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order."

I suppose it means that the captain - along with all the men ranked above him - is as guilty as the subordinate who executes the order at his request.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 11:50:03 AM

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Context from: The ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha

CHAPTER XIII

In which is ended the story of the shepherdess marcela, with other incidents



By these words of his the travellers were able to satisfy themselves of Don Quixote's being out of his senses and of the form of madness that overmastered him, at which they felt the same astonishment that all felt on first becoming acquainted with it; and Vivaldo, who was a person of great shrewdness and of a lively temperament, in order to beguile the short journey which they said was required to reach the mountain, the scene of the burial, sought to give him an opportunity of going on with his absurdities. So he said to him, "It seems to me, Senor Knight-errant, that your worship has made choice of one of the most austere professions in the world, and I imagine even that of the Carthusian monks is not so austere."

"As austere it may perhaps be," replied our Don Quixote, "but so necessary for the world I am very much inclined to doubt. For, if the truth is to be told, the soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order. My meaning, is, that churchmen in peace and quiet pray to Heaven for the welfare of the world, but we soldiers and knights carry into effect what they pray for, defending it with the might of our arms and the edge of our swords, not under shelter but in the open air, a target for the intolerable rays of the sun in summer and the piercing frosts of winter. Thus are we God's ministers on earth and the arms by which his justice is done therein. And as the business of war and all that relates and belongs to it cannot be conducted without exceeding great sweat, toil, and exertion, it follows that those who make it their profession have undoubtedly more labour than those who in tranquil peace and quiet are engaged in praying to God to help the weak. I do not mean to say, nor does it enter into my thoughts, that the knight-errant's calling is as good as that of the monk in his cell; I would merely infer from what I endure myself that it is beyond a doubt a more laborious and a more belaboured one, a hungrier and thirstier, a wretcheder, raggeder, and lousier; for there is no reason to doubt that the knights-errant of yore endured much hardship in the course of their lives. And if some of them by the might of their arms did rise to be emperors, in faith it cost them dear in the matter of blood and sweat; and if those who attained to that rank had not had magicians and sages to help them they would have been completely baulked in their ambition and disappointed in their hopes."

"That is my own opinion," replied the traveller; "but one thing among many others seems to me very wrong in knights-errant, and that is that when they find themselves about to engage in some mighty and perilous adventure in which there is manifest danger of losing their lives, they never at the moment of engaging in it think of commending themselves to God, as is the duty of every good Christian in like peril; instead of which they commend themselves to their ladies with as much devotion as if these were their gods, a thing which seems to me to savour somewhat of heathenism."





Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 12:16:42 PM
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Daemon wrote:
The soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


It doesn't relate to orders which bring fame and fortune...
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 1:20:09 PM
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Daemon wrote:
The soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


Yes, but does he do more? In terms of what it may cost him.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 1:59:54 PM

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Still military commanders may be more important than soldiers. No military unit can function without commanders.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 2:01:37 PM

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zina antoaneta wrote:
The cowards' excuse!
"I just followed orders", was the justification of the Nazi war criminals at the 1945-1946 Nuremberg trial.


It is not what Don Miguel meant. What he refers to is the chain of command and military hierarchy with respect to the functional efficiency of
military units.
NELDCES
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 5:24:05 PM
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The soldier who executes what his captain orders does no less than the captain himself who gives the order.


:)
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