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Lucy Stone (1818) Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Lucy Stone (1818)

In 1847, Stone became the first Massachusetts woman to graduate college. Not long after, she began speaking on women's rights. An effective orator, she is said to have swayed antagonistic audiences and inspired Susan B. Anthony to join the cause. She kept her own name after marriage as a protest against the unequal laws applied to married women, and others who did the same called themselves "Lucy Stoners." She caused an uproar by wearing "bloomers." What were they, and why were they so named? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 12:39:11 AM

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Today's Birthday
Lucy Stone (1818)
In 1847, Stone became the first Massachusetts woman to graduate college. Not long after, she began speaking on women's rights. An effective orator, she is said to have swayed antagonistic audiences and inspired Susan B. Anthony to join the cause. She kept her own name after marriage as a protest against the unequal laws applied to married women, and others who did the same called themselves "Lucy Stoners." She caused an uproar by wearing "bloomers."
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 10:57:10 AM

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Abolitionist were white. This is what modern black racists running about with dreadlocks and chains often forget.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 12:46:16 PM

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When American Feminists Were Pilloried for Daring to Wear Bloomers
Turns out that there is no garment that women can’t get criticized for wearing.


BY MANISHA AGGARWAL-SCHIFELLITE MAY 31, 2016


An engraving of four women wearing different types of bloomers, c. 1850. (Photo: Kean Collection/Getty Images)


IN THE SUMMER OF 1851, a pair of pants made headlines across America.

The “bloomer costume,” also called “Turkish trowsers,” set off a storm of commentary from women’s rights activists, fashion enthusiasts, and critics across the country. In an August issue of the Water-Cure Journal, a publication dedicated to alternative medicine and social reform, a woman named Mary Williams described the outfit as “Turkish pantaloons and a short skirt, leaving the upper vestments to be fashioned according to the taste of the wearer.” Williams wrote that the bloomer costume was “infinitely superior” and “ought to receive the friendly countenance of all sensible persons of either sex,” emphasizing that the choice to wear the outfit was based on health and fashion, rather than a desire to wear men’s clothes.


http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/when-american-feminists-were-pilloried-for-daring-to-wear-bloomers




zina antoaneta
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 3:46:46 PM
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What a remarkable woman!
zina antoaneta
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 4:02:41 PM
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monamagda wrote:


When American Feminists Were Pilloried for Daring to Wear Bloomers
Turns out that there is no garment that women can’t get criticized for wearing.


BY MANISHA AGGARWAL-SCHIFELLITE MAY 31, 2016


An engraving of four women wearing different types of bloomers, c. 1850. (Photo: Kean Collection/Getty Images)


IN THE SUMMER OF 1851, a pair of pants made headlines across America.

The “bloomer costume,” also called “Turkish trowsers,” set off a storm of commentary from women’s rights activists, fashion enthusiasts, and critics across the country. In an August issue of the Water-Cure Journal, a publication dedicated to alternative medicine and social reform, a woman named Mary Williams described the outfit as “Turkish pantaloons and a short skirt, leaving the upper vestments to be fashioned according to the taste of the wearer.” Williams wrote that the bloomer costume was “infinitely superior” and “ought to receive the friendly countenance of all sensible persons of either sex,” emphasizing that the choice to wear the outfit was based on health and fashion, rather than a desire to wear men’s clothes.


http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/when-american-feminists-were-pilloried-for-daring-to-wear-bloomers






The Indian interpretation of bloomers 150 years later:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BX2FzH7kf6Y/UcMFM8W1JEI/AAAAAAAAAOM/-o7c2bw3WvI/s1600/printed-punjabi-suits.jpg
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