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Daddy's hair is fluffy Options
bihunsedap
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:14:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/26/2014
Posts: 1,040
Neurons: 5,189


He went to hair cut.

The barber blowed his hair with hair dryer.

His hair looks fluffy (more thick and look more hair.)

His son seen it and say, "Daddy's hair is fluffy"

Is the expression above of fluffy used correctly?
palapaguy
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:11:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 241
Neurons: 6,274
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
bihunsedap wrote:


He went to get a hair cut.

The barber blew his hair with a hair dryer.

His hair looks fluffy (thicker and more hair.)

His saw it and said, "Daddy's hair is fluffy"

Is the expression above of fluffy used correctly?

If his hair looked light and soft, then fluffy is correct.
Gabriel82
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:52:06 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/22/2017
Posts: 35
Neurons: 43,833
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas, United States
bihunsedap wrote:


He went to hair cut.

The barber blowed his hair with hair dryer.

His hair looks fluffy (more thick and look more hair.)

His son seen it and say, "Daddy's hair is fluffy"

Is the expression above of fluffy used correctly?


My mom dragged me to all her hair salon appointments and she used to own a beauty shop. I never heard a single stylist male or female ever use that word to describe hair. To them, the proper term would be either of the following:

1)bouffant

bouffant (ˈbuːfɒŋ)
adj
1. (Hairdressing & Grooming) (of a hair style) having extra height and width through back-combing; puffed out
2. (Clothing & Fashion) (of sleeves, skirts, etc) puffed out
n
(Hairdressing & Grooming) a bouffant hair style
[C20: from French, from bouffer to puff up]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

2) Full (or full-bodied)
palapaguy
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 11:35:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 241
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Yes, "full" is the word I was searching for.
Gabriel82
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 12:20:19 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/22/2017
Posts: 35
Neurons: 43,833
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas, United States
I nearly forgot the other term: when they backcomb to give hair on a lady more volume, they "tease" it.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 3:27:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 12,368
Neurons: 37,643
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

The 'proper' terms that a hairdresser uses are really good to know.

However, one has to take context into consideration.

We're talking about a little boy having a casual conversation with his Daddy.

Saying "Daddy's hair's fluffy" is not only correct - it's a very good descriptor for a little non-native speaker baby to say!

Let's not get so anxious to be technical about the speech of a 3 or 4 year old. The word 'fluffy' is a very good choice and shows the child knows, in English, what he wants to say.

If it were either of my own, English-speaking children who said that at that age, I would praise them warmly!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 3:46:41 AM

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Joined: 10/13/2015
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Neurons: 234,337
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Romany wrote:
Saying "Daddy's hair's fluffy" is not only correct - it's a very good descriptor for a little non-native speaker baby to say!

flocculent and furfuraceous

Would it be good for a big non-native goof that I am?

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 5:20:06 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 12,368
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Indeed!
Also: - Do you know the expression "Bed hair"? (There's even a range of hair-care products called that!)

It's the way some people (especially with fine hair like mine!) wake up in the morning: their hair sticking out at all angles, or in tangles? It's very common in English to arrive at work and wail "Agh! I've got bed hair this morning! I can't do anything with it!"
Even when it's brushed vigourously, bed hair sometimes turns into fluffy hair and won't sit down. (Yes - hair 'sits'!)

I even have to be careful what shampoo & products I use because quite a few of them make me 'fluffy' like a small duck!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 5:42:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 815
Neurons: 234,337
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Romany wrote:
Even when it's brushed vigourously, bed hair sometimes turns into fluffy hair and won't sit down. (Yes - hair 'sits'!)

Thank you!



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 9:04:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 606
Neurons: 122,921
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
He went to hair cut.
Daddy got his hair cut.

The barber blowed his hair with hair dryer.
The barber dried his hair using a hair dryer. (or using a blow dryer)

His hair looks fluffy (more thick and look more hair.)
His hair looked fluffy, appearing thicker and fuller.

His son seen it and say, "Daddy's hair is fluffy"
His son saw it and said, "Daddy's hair is fluffy."


Is the expression above of fluffy used correctly?
Is fluffy used correctly?
palapaguy
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 10:50:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 241
Neurons: 6,274
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Romany wrote:

Indeed!
Also: - Do you know the expression "Bed hair"? (There's even a range of hair-care products called that!)

It's the way some people (especially with fine hair like mine!) wake up in the morning: their hair sticking out at all angles, or in tangles? It's very common in English to arrive at work and wail "Agh! I've got bed hair this morning! I can't do anything with it!"
Even when it's brushed vigourously, bed hair sometimes turns into fluffy hair and won't sit down. (Yes - hair 'sits'!)

I even have to be careful what shampoo & products I use because quite a few of them make me 'fluffy' like a small duck!


Often called "bed head" here in these environs.
TMe
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 11:30:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 413
Neurons: 2,634
After a hair cut, the barber made dad's hair look flocculent. IMO

I am a layman.
Gabriel82
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 11:29:07 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/22/2017
Posts: 35
Neurons: 43,833
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas, United States
The "context" refers to the word being correct and the correct context is hair styling, as given by the picture. The OP never said "is this correct for a non-native baby to say," but rather "is this correct?" Big difference--not unlike the difference between Eddie Van Halen modifying a Kramer guitar and then Eddie designing a guitar with Ernie Ball--it changed everything from the pickups, the body...you name it.

The OP had nothing to do with "which is better," such as in the difference between "shading" and "value" in art: ask any art teacher and you'll get a very definite answer that both are not the same. By the above reasoning, both these terms are correct--but a huge chasm separates them.
Romany
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 2:56:29 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 12,368
Neurons: 37,643
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Gabriel,

Bihunsedap, as you can see, has been with us for a few years. He told us in the very beginning why he was joining and what it was he wanted - and we have 'seen' his child grow from a baby who was just learning to speak to now. Over that time, of trying to give his son an educational advantage, his own English has improved incredibly.

On a forum such as this one of the nice things is that through interacting regularly we aren't just talking to avatars, but to people; - bits of whose lives we become familiar with. Like Bihunsedap and his son.

That was what I meant by 'context': he doesn't need grammar or complicated vocab and doesn't have the linguistic skills himself to understand complicated sentences. As newbies can't be aware of all the personalities on the forum, sometimes it helps to know exactly what it is they come to the forum for.

I know it helped me a lot when I first joined. Just returning the favour.
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