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D00M
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 3:47:22 PM

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Hello respected teachers,

Although it is common for parents these days to place their children that are pre-school age into childcare centres, some people criticise this and argue that children will receive a better level of care from relatives such as grandparents.


What's the part of speech of 'age' and 'pre-school'? Should there not be 'at' before 'pre-school'? Because I usually see 'age' preceded with 'at', for example: 'at a very young age', 'at an old age' etc.
Gabriel82
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:57:49 PM

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"Although it is common for parents these days to place their children that are pre-school age into childcare centres, some people criticise this and argue that children will receive a better level of care from relatives such as grandparents."

"age" is a noun and "preschool" serves to modify it, so that is an adjective; "at" before preschool is not required.
D00M
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:17:15 AM

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Gabriel82 wrote:
"Although it is common for parents these days to place their children that are pre-school age into childcare centres, some people criticise this and argue that children will receive a better level of care from relatives such as grandparents."

"age" is a noun and "preschool" serves to modify it, so that is an adjective; "at" before preschool is not required.


Thank you.

So, is 'at preschool age' also acceptable?
Audiendus
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:45:40 AM
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In informal English, it is common to omit the preposition, as the meaning will be clearly understood. Strictly speaking, however, a preposition is required, as a child is not literally the same thing as an age — he/she cannot literally "be" an age.

Where the phrase is adjectival, the normal preposition is "of", e.g:

a child of pre-school age
the child is of pre-school age


although "at" is occasionally used in some cases, e.g:

the child is at an age where...

Where the phrase is adverbial, "at" is used, e.g:

at pre-school age, a child does not normally know...
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 9:09:02 AM

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...place their children that are pre-school age...
...place their children who are pre-school age...
Romany
Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 3:19:31 AM
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I know you're only doing this as an exercise, Doom. So I think it should be pointed out that, in 'natural' English we wouldn't say "...their children who are pre-school age...". It would be "their pre-school age children..."
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