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wanting Options
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 5:01:08 PM

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Joined: 10/13/2015
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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/wanting

Quote:
prep.
1. Without; missing: a shirt wanting a button.
2. Minus; less: an hour wanting 15 minutes

I thought it was very interesting but couldn't find any use of the idiom on the Internet.
Is the word actually ever used this way?



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
NKM
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 6:31:13 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
The word "wanting" can be used in that sense, though not very likely in quite the way it appears in those two examples.

My shirt may be wanting a button, but "missing a button" is much more natural. And I can't really imagine anyone saying "an hour wanting 15 minutes".

You may, however, hear "It's a good car, wanting only a more powerful engine" or "He tried his best, but was found wanting."



Lexicographers are loath to lose words or usages, even when those usages have largely gone out of fashion and can be found only in old writings. I shall not fault them for that, since people do still read some of those old writings and need to understand how the words were used in the past.

sureshot
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 6:35:18 PM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/wanting

Quote:
prep.
1. Without; missing: a shirt wanting a button.
2. Minus; less: an hour wanting 15 minutes

I thought it was very interesting but couldn't find any use of the idiom on the Internet.
Is the word actually ever used this way?


____________________

The word "wanting" is an adjective. It can be used as a preposition as also mentioned in TFD. The verb and noun form is "want". The adjective "wanting" is a formal word and is not used before a noun. The word "want" has its origin in Middle English: the noun from Old Norse vant, neuter of vanr ‘lacking’; the verb from Old Norse vanta ‘be lacking’. The original notion of ‘lack’ was early extended to ‘need’ and from this developed the sense ‘desire’.

One idiomatic use that I can think of instantly is based on the verb "want". The phrasal verb is "want in /out". It means "to desire to enter or leave". If you want out, you no longer want to be involved in a plan, project, or situation that you are part of.

- The dog wants in. (= desires to enter)
- We've had enough of this plan, Neil. We want out.(= we no longer want to be part of the plan)

I have not come across any adjective phrase using the adjective form "wanting".
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 11:49:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 999
Neurons: 313,060
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
NKM wrote:
And I can't really imagine anyone saying "an hour wanting 15 minutes".

I flipped through all the Google pages - the references are only to dictionaries and discussions like ours. We've added one more to that. :)

Thank you!



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
thar
Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 3:06:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,755
Neurons: 62,977
I checked my preferred 'British ' dictionaries.

Cambridge and Oxford had nothing, Collins had it under American, but as archaic under British.


I would never use this form, as what they call a preposition - I have heard it as a verb in this context
Eg
What's the time
It wants five of the hour


I would never expect to use it in that form. And to me, that is not a preposition, it is a participle. It is the hour that is wanting a quarter.

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