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D00M
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 10:01:08 AM

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Hello respected teachers,

What's the difference between 'spend on' and 'spend for' in the following context?

As is given in the bar graph, British people spent more than 170 thousand pound sterling for/on photographic films which is the highest amount spent on any consumer good by them as well as than other countries.

I am looking forward to your answers.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 10:38:04 AM

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You pay x for something.
You spend x on something.

But very important - do not mix how you write your numbers.
Not 170 thousand. Shame on you

In normal text, write the number - a hundred and seventy thousand.

In text like this, where you need the numbers to be clear and instantly identifiable, write the figures - 170,000.

But never mix the two!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 12:30:46 PM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
The word 'than', in the last line, is not necessary.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
thar
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 12:41:12 PM

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True.
I was only pointing out that mistake, so don't take the absence of other notes from me as an evidence of an absence of erriors.

Well, technically you can't compare two different things:
British people
...and other countries.


You need to compare parallel things:
British people
...those from other countries
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 12:51:12 PM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
E're great thar. Best persons and great souls admit truths. Accolades.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 5:15:17 PM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
While we're nitpicking: It's "e'er", not "e're".

georgieporgie
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 5:29:28 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/7/2017
Posts: 56
Neurons: 280
thar wrote:
You pay x for something.
You spend x on something.

But very important - do not mix how you write your numbers.
Not 170 thousand. Shame on you

In normal text, write the number - a hundred and seventy thousand.

In text like this, where you need the numbers to be clear and instantly identifiable, write the figures - 170,000.

But never mix the two!

Thar wrote: "... a hundred and seventy thousand ..."
I seem to remember being taught that the "and" is not proper form. Is that true? Would "... a hundred seventy thousand ..." be better?
thar
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 3:32:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,754
Neurons: 62,972
The 'and' is used in British English.

There is no 'and' when saying this in American English. (I don't know about other world variations).


(And there is some really weird system using 'and' to express the decimals? Think )

It is more important to know which system when you are using when it comes to figures:
17.000 (European)
17,000 (British + Anglophone)

A big difference if you swap those around!

Also dates -
9/8/17 (British, European, Aus) d/m/y
8/9/17 (US) m/d/y

That is why it is important to know which language version you are learning.




NKM
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 6:26:02 PM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
"170,000" = "one hundred seventy thousand" (no "and").

But if I'm a bit quicker in my pronunciation, the "one" gives way to "a", and it becomes "a hundred 'n' seventy thousand".

We (Americans) normally don't write that "and", but it creeps in when we say the number. In casual everyday speech it's almost always there, though not fully pronounced, whenever the "hundred" is preceded by the indefinite article. Quite often, too, it's there if the number of hundreds is something other than one ("three hundred 'n' sixty five days a year"), and it sometimes sneaks in even if we actually pronounce the leading "one".

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