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Singapore Is Expelled from Malaysia (1965) Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Singapore Is Expelled from Malaysia (1965)

After more than a century of British rule, Singapore gained independence in 1959. Four years later, it joined with nearby territories to form Malaysia. However, racial and economic tensions arose, and two years later, the Malaysian parliament unanimously voted to expel Singapore. Despite being left unexpectedly autonomous with few defenses or natural resources, Singapore rapidly developed into an economic powerhouse. Still, it remains dependent on Malaysia for what one critical thing? More...
KSPavan
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This Day in History
Singapore Is Expelled from Malaysia (1965)
After more than a century of British rule, Singapore gained independence in 1959. Four years later, it joined with nearby territories to form Malaysia. However, racial and economic tensions arose, and two years later, the Malaysian parliament unanimously voted to expel Singapore. Despite being left unexpectedly autonomous with few defenses or natural resources, Singapore rapidly developed into an economic powerhouse.
taurine
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Frequently occurring burning forests close to the border may create additional need for fresh air. Or, "refreshment" in the mutual relationship.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 11:35:58 AM

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Singapore's dependence on Malaysia for half of its water needs

Singapore, Malaysia and Water

Singapore imports about half of the 300 million gallons of water it uses every day from Malaysia. The water comes in a pipe adjacent to the Singapore-Malaysia causeway over the kilometer- wide Johor Strait. According to an agreement in effect until 2011 Malaysia was obligated to supply Singapore with water unless the two countries went to war. The current contract expires in 2061. Kuala Lumpur wants a price increase, or to sell Singapore treated rather than raw water so it could reap more benefits from the deal. In 2003, Malaysia sold raw water to Singapore at three Malaysian sen (less than one cent) per 1000 gallons (4550 litres)

Ben Bland wrote in the Asia Sentinel, “When Singapore’s newest reservoir was opened this weekend, it was billed as the garden city’s latest leisure hub, designed to attract boaters and picnickers keen to escape the hectic pace of urban life. But the Marina Reservoir, the 15th to be built in Singapore and the first to be located in the city center, has a much more important role to play. It is the latest advance in the city-state’s drive to wean itself away from imported water from Malaysia and its concomitant political entanglements. In the process, Singapore has emerged as an unlikely world leader in water conservation, reclamation and desalination. [Source: Ben Bland, Asia Sentinel, November 6, 2008 /^\]

“As the imposing figures of Lee Kuan Yew and his long-time sparring partner, former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, begun to fade – neither is there yet – the tensions over water have dissipated somewhat. However, with the first water agreement set to expire in 2011 and no replacement deal in sight, the Singaporean government has moved ahead at a fearsome pace with its push to reduce its dependence on imported water. /^\

“Yet despite the apparent easing of tensions between Malaysia and Singapore over recent years, Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore’s current prime minister and Lee Kuan Yew's son, hinted at the importance of continuing to reduce the country’s reliance on Malaysian imports. "Through the concerted efforts and ingenuity of government agencies, and the full support and cooperation of the population, we have become more self-sufficient in water, and can become completely self-sufficient should we need to," he said. "We have also turned our vulnerability into a capability." /^\

www.eldis.org/document/A15150
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