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Gwinn was pleased WITH the results. Options
Maggie Q
Posted: Monday, August 07, 2017 4:29:07 AM
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Joined: 5/15/2017
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a ) Gwinn was pleased WITH the results.

b) Gwinn was pleased BY the results.

c) Gwinn was pleased AT the results.

d) Gwinn was pleased ABOUT the results.


Question 1: What's the difference between these four sentences?

Question 2: Gwinn was pleased with the results. = Gwinn was satisfied with the results. = Gwinn was happy with the results.?
Clyde Mitchell
Posted: Monday, August 07, 2017 6:21:01 AM

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Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
To me, 'pleased AT' doesn't sound quite natural. The others are all fine and mean pretty much the same thing.
sureshot
Posted: Monday, August 07, 2017 7:48:28 AM
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Maggie Q wrote:
a ) Gwinn was pleased WITH the results.

b) Gwinn was pleased BY the results.

c) Gwinn was pleased AT the results.

d) Gwinn was pleased ABOUT the results.


Question: What's the difference among these four sentences?


___________________________

The most usual preposition after "pleased" is "with". So, the first sentence using "with" is the best.

- Gwinn was pleased WITH the results.

Generally, we say "pleased with (something/someone)". In the given sentence, "something" stands for "results". "Pleased with" is used to tell someone that you are pleased with something they have done in order to express your approval. However, there are some sentences where there is overlapping in the choice of preposition. I have come across the following sentence in Collins Dictionary:

- I am very pleased about the result.

The adjective "pleased" can be followed by the prepositions with, at, about or for. To the best of my knowledge, there is no rule that helps in selecting the preposition after the adjective "pleased". The appropriate preposition after "pleased" depends upon the rest of the prepositional phrase and the context of the sentence. I usually replace the adjective "pleased" with "disappointed" and "satisfied". If the sentence still sounds okay, I opt for "with" after "pleased".

Here are a few examples from a variety of sources, that should help in deciding the usual preposition after the adjective "pleased"

Pleased with

Pleased with something/somebody is used when expressing a feeling of happiness about something.

- He was pleased with his logic.
- I'm really pleased with your work this term.
- His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
- Neil's teacher was pleased with his progress.
- Of course, not everybody was pleased with the outcome.
- John French was very pleased with third place after a season fighting a back injury.
- The reputed sportsman was evidently pleased with his honorary military designation and rank.
- I was pleased with the overall response and I think we collectively felt a modicum of relief.
- Dean was pleased with the opportunity.
- The governor was much pleased with this answer.
- The child was pleased with any toy that produced noise.

The use of "pleased with" is very common when the phrase is followed by a reflexive pronoun, e.g.

- Noel must have been feeling pretty pleased with himself on Tuesday night.(= happy and satisfied about something good that you have done or that has happened to you)
- You look rather pleased with yourself.

Pleased about

Pleased about something is used to refer to any act concerning or relating to a particular subject

- "And what is she so pleased about?" thought Nicholas, looking at his sister.
- Are you pleased about John's promotion?
- Her parents were very pleased about her award.
- I could tell she was pleased about something.
- It was also apparent that she was pleased about their discord.

Pleased at


The preposition "at" is generally used to denote "time". If the phrase after "pleased at" provides the answer to "when", the use of expression "pleased at" is possible. Here are a few examples which provide the answer to "when". So, the use of "pleased at" is correct:

- I was very pleased at discovering that.
- She was none too pleased at having to do it all again.
- Pierre chimed in, pleased at the arrival of the reinforcement.
- Was he pleased about/at the news?
- Nisha seemed pleased at the suggestion.
- He was pleased at the gratitude he received, but felt abashed at receiving it.

In my view, the use of "pleased with" is also correct in the last two sentences.

Pleased by

In my view, if you can substitute "pleased by" with "on account of" and the sentence is reasonably okay, the use of "pleased by" is correct. Here are a few examples:

- She was so pleased by praise from her professor that she blushed with pleasure.
- I was pleased by his candour.
- Were you pleased by our rather gruesome discovery?
- She was just as entranced, just as easily pleased by the world.

Pleased for

The phrase "pleased for" is used to say which person or thing your feelings of happiness are directed towards:

- That's wonderful! I'm really pleased for you.
- I'm so pleased for him, because we have all gone through a lot recently".
- And I'm pleased for John's sake.



foolofgrace
Posted: Monday, August 07, 2017 9:32:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/5/2015
Posts: 148
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Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
For Question 2, they do not necessarily mean the same thing. "Happy" and "pleased" mean pretty much the same thing, but you can be satisfied with something without being happy about it. For example, your boss can give you a small raise in salary and you can be satisfied with it but not very happy about it if you think it should be a larger amount.
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