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Neil Alden Armstrong (1930) Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Neil Alden Armstrong (1930)

Armstrong became a pilot at 16, studied aeronautical engineering, and won three medals as a US Navy pilot in the Korean War. He became test pilot in 1955 and joined the space program in 1962. He made history in 1969, when he became the first person to walk on the Moon, a feat he famously declared "one giant leap for mankind." Though this brought him worldwide renown, he, for the most part, avoided the limelight. What unusual legal battle did he face with his barber in 2005? More...
KSPavan
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Today's Birthday
Neil Alden Armstrong (1930)
Armstrong became a pilot at 16, studied aeronautical engineering, and won three medals as a US Navy pilot in the Korean War. He became test pilot in 1955 and joined the space program in 1962. He made history in 1969, when he became the first person to walk on the Moon, a feat he famously declared "one giant leap for mankind." Though this brought him worldwide renown, he, for the most part, avoided the limelight.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2017 12:59:55 PM

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Rest in peace, Neil. It was really a giant leap for the mankind!
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2017 6:12:06 PM

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A bad hair day for the first man on the moon

By Jim White12:01AM BST 06 Jun 2005

Neil Armstrong has a fine head of hair for a man of 75. Lustrous, silvery, with only the merest hint of recession at the crown, the quality of his mane suggests that the one true cure for male-pattern baldness might be to step out on to the surface of the moon. In fact, so fecund are his follicles, Armstrong likes to visit his barber in Cincinnati once a month to ensure he does not turn into the wild man of Ohio. For years, he has patronised a barber's shop run by Marx Sizemore, an old-fashioned hairdresser who restricts the small talk to chit-chat about politics and current affairs, and perhaps the occasional reference to the fact it is a full moon. Armstrong valued Sizemore's discretion, the way he treated him like any other customer.
But recently it was drawn to Armstrong's attention that a collector called John Reznikoff was boasting that he had a lock of the first human hair to have visited the moon. Armstrong, who has always shunned celebrity, initially assumed this was a fib. He had never met Reznikoff, never mind given him a piece of himself. But no, the collector had a certificate of authenticity, given by the agent who had bought the hair from a third party, an affidavit swearing that it originated from Armstrong's barnet. The third party's name, Armstrong discovered, was Marx Sizemore.
It turned out that, in 2004, Todd Mueller, an agent dealing in celebrity memorabilia, had visited Sizemore's shop. During a conversation over the short back and sides, the proprietor was made suddenly aware of the value of the detritus tumbling on to the floor of his work place. The next time Armstrong visited for his monthly cut, instead of brushing it up and throwing it away as he normally did, and without telling the great astronaut what he was up to, Sizemore gathered the clippings and sold them to Mueller for $3,000, roughly £1,600. Which, you could say, was one small trim for man, one giant profit for his barber.
As soon as he found out what had happened, Armstrong lit up like Apollo 11 re-entering Earth's atmosphere. Furious at the invasion of his privacy, he briefed his lawyers to make immediate contact with Sizemore. They gave the barber a deadline of Friday, June 17, either to donate all financial gains to a charity nominated by Armstrong, or to return the hair. Armstrong, they said, preferred the latter course of action, though they didn't say why. Perhaps Mrs A was looking to stuff some cushions. Sizemore categorically refused to return his little windfall, claiming that the hair was his the moment it hit the cutting-room floor. And so an impasse has been reached. Cincinnati's lawyers must be rubbing their hands at the prospect of a nice little earner as they squabble over what could become an important precedent in our celebrity-obsessed world.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/jimwhite/3617427/A-bad-hair-day-for-the-first-man-on-the-moon.html
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