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African Development Bank to finance Ghana and Ivory Coast cocoa Options
progpen
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 9:55:06 AM

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http://www.nasdaq.com/article/african-development-bank-to-finance-ghanaivory-coast-cocoa-plan-20170802-02032?
"The African Development Bank (AfDB) [AFDB.UL] is willing to provide $1.2 billion to finance plans by Ivory Coast and Ghana to process more of their cocoa under a joint initiative to guarantee stable revenues from the commodity, the continental lender said on Wednesday."

Ivory Coast and Ghana produce 60% of the world cocoa, but are struggling with a cocoa plant disease (Swollen Shoot) as well as price volatility. AfDB President Akinwumi Adesina said, "I've never seen a situation anywhere in the world where anyone who produces 75 percent of a commodity is just a price taker... this must change and it's about how smart you interface the global market,"

The 1.2 billion will "finance the construction of modern storage facilities, farm rehabilitation and disease control, including payment of compensations to owners of cocoa trees ravaged by swollen-shoot viral disease."

Be kind but be fierce. You are needed now more than ever before. Take up the mantel of change. For this is your time.
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 10:33:50 AM

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Yay!

A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
taurine
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 10:36:53 AM

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I think that processing plants are expensive to build. If the money would be directed more towards processing the cocoa grains and development of new facilities focused on producing material ready to convert into chocolate ingots, for example, it could be beneficial to the economy in these countries.

Nice article, progpen, really.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 10:53:44 AM

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progpen wrote:
Ivory Coast and Ghana produce 60% of the world cocoa, but are struggling with a cocoa plant disease (Swollen Shoot) as well as price volatility.

I love chocolate. Every day I buy a bar of this:



When in Canada I was the only to ask for a cup of hot chocolate in Timmie's when everybody else chose coffee double-double.

I wish they would overcome the disease.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
progpen
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 11:55:42 AM

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I'm hoping that this financial help will give the farmers more control over their product and the market. There is always a balancing act between producers and consumers when it comes to market prices, but if the farmers are forced to grow something else in order to make a living, we could end up with skyrocketing cocoa prices.

Be kind but be fierce. You are needed now more than ever before. Take up the mantel of change. For this is your time.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 12:30:36 PM

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In reference to Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 I wish to say that, overcoming the disease might be easier accomplished if proper, although expensive, facilities responsible for dealing with farming handling process could be put at the place.
This in itself might incur intense scrutiny as to the methods of collecting and delivering to the points of processing the grains. Needles to say about high hygienic issues inadvertently arising in the moment from the harvest of the crop.

The facilities in question could be dealing with proper management of delivery, storage and forward carrying to the points where the quality of grains harvested could be again examined and pronounced as suitable for further processing. Extensive examination within the laboratory facilities and fully trained staff as well could be needed. The measures applied should help deliver expected quality of the product ready to process. I think, so.

I am of the opinion that the International Organization for Standardization has in its vast library resources needed to cope with the problem of storage. The ISO 10668, given be me as an example, specifies requirements for procedures and methods of monetary brand measurement. It includes, inter alia, a framework for brand valuation, including objectives... The problem remains, what the objectives in mind of the decision-makers in these African countries are. The ISO 10668 should not be understood without proper brand equity idea perception.

To sum it up: read ISO, if you want to get what you want.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 1:12:59 PM

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With due reverence to the words uttered by progpen, I don't believe in the content of the post written by him/her.
The farmers are constituting always the first, initial element in the chain of product life cycle. It does not put the farmers on the position of being the deciding force what to do with the final product. The farmers heavily rely on the demand from the collectors.

The financial help offered by the African Bank Development should not at all be directed to the farmers.

The means in question should be directed in to other elements of the chain of a life product. Especially, towards the preparing of the staff capable of handling with the issues of hygienic. Another vital element in the product life cycle after delivering the row material is storage. How the grains are stored? How the grains are examined as being fit for human consumption? How the grains are packed to be delivered to another facility where they should be again examined? How, after second examination of the grains, they are processed to be made available for processing into powder? Multiple issues are arising here and again I think that ISO contains in their regulations the answer, how to do a good product called chocolate.

Needless to say about the new numbers of skilled workforce created. And a huge boost to the entire economy in these countries.
New schools. New faculties. New, better educated population. More people willing to spend on the products made in these countries
More money for the people to raise their children. Improved access to to knowledge. Knowledge = power. The rise of the democracy.

Stronger Africa. Wiser African people. Wiser, because of an access to the education, better food, newer technology.

progpen
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 1:27:21 PM

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I agree that managing and containing the swollen shoot virus should be a priority. That said, even if the virus is completely eradicated, but prices continue to be artificially suppressed for the farmers, then the new generations of potential farmers will look elsewhere for gainful employment. There is already a shortage of cocoa farmers because they can't make enough to support themselves.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/07/03/419243305/why-the-world-might-be-running-out-of-cocoa-farmers
It's well known that most cocoa farmers live in extreme poverty. There are about 2 million small-scale farmers in Ghana and Ivory Coast, the West African countries that produce at least 70 percent of the world's cocoa beans. The average cocoa farmer in Ghana earns 84 cents a day, while the average small farmer in Ivory Coast earns just 50 cents a day, There are also human rights issues such as child labor and slavery as well as the fact that the money earned by women farmers is taken by the men in the family.

Giving the farmers themselves more control over their markets will increase the standard of living for the farmers and attract new generations of farmers. If that doesn't happen, then the continued artificially suppressed prices paid to the farmers will decimate the market.

Be kind but be fierce. You are needed now more than ever before. Take up the mantel of change. For this is your time.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 1:36:55 PM

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Prices cannot be suppressed for the farmers if proper legislation is in operation.
There should be at least a subcommittee in their respective Parliaments to promulgate adequate law.
Those subcommittees should be given a right to submit their vote on the issues that matter.
I don't think that it is impossible.

Those subcommittees could be, at least in part, funded from the money expected. Under the condition that their members are farmers. The farmers who can prove their high yield from their fields. With additional incentive from the Banks it could work.

By the way, although I don't know French, I prefer Côte d'Ivoire name.
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 1:50:04 PM

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I have bought only Fair Trade coffee and chocolate ever since they started that movement. It costs a little more, but so what. That should be the norm.


A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
progpen
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 1:53:22 PM

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Hope, same here regarding the free trade.

Taurine, I agree that price suppression should not be possible, but the reality on the ground is that big money from the multinational corporate buyers pays for a lot of access to local and national governments.

Be kind but be fierce. You are needed now more than ever before. Take up the mantel of change. For this is your time.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 4:01:55 PM

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progpen

The problem related to the money could be overcome with a quite simple solution.

Think about a special task force. The name in itself sounds nice and powerful.

The people chosen to be members of this group could be consisting of: the President of the Country, the Prime Minister, the Speaker of the Parliament, the group of the parliamentarians involved in agriculture, the Minister of the Agriculture, and at last but not least - the leader of the opposition Parliamentary fraction. In addition to this group a representative from the Bank affording the funding with his/her guidance as being a person who has proven record of scholar experience possessing at least the PD in agriculture and business management, and a group of dedicated - specially selected - farmers who can prove their achievements from the professional side. It could also be good to consider the group of the chosen professors from their best Universities with the proven record of involvement in the agriculture matters. The theoretical approach taken from the Universities combined with the experience taken from the selected farmers could work well. I believe that the countries in question possess good quality Universities and knowledgeable scholars. On the margin, recently I had a pleasure to read a scholar paper treating on business management written by Nigerian scholars. So, if a need arises, Nigeria is not distant from Ghana, for example. And you, Africans, do not need to import white intellectual power because you have it at home, too.

The issue with the local government can be amicably solved if the people from the country-side recognize the intellectual integrity of the people chosen to the "special task force".
This means that, the local government should be given an access to the white papers treating on the matter.
This could create an opportunity to influence the chosen farmers who already had been chosen as members of the decision-makers special task group to alleviate the painful concerns amid those who are not directly involved in the process of making a decision.

Every village has a leader. And the leader of the village has a direct responsibility to the people who made him/her their boss.
This could mean that, the farmers who are less skilful but still maintain the same kind of crop to sow, could be given a chance to utter their concerns and receive proper answer from their direct leader in the village. If the answer from the leader of the village does not match the expected result, sack the leader.

As to the problem with the multinationals the story is, from my point of view that, irresponsible leaders of the countries in Africa, for example, [I am sorry for that direct statement] are handing over the future benefits from the harvest taken from the economy for the immediate profit. The profit which, usually unaccounted for, goes into the private pocket. What about the power of the people choosing their representatives to their Parliaments, I don't know. Perhaps they are too scary about their immediate families.
But if the heads of the families will be still inclined to be subservient, their children will not get, for example, proper education they could, and their children could follow the suit in the same pattern. And later on a voice could again emerge: imperialists are destructing our country.

I must add that the subcommittee conceived in my mind is the additional body to the special task force.
The subcommittee must be a body which is giving only directions to the special task force. But this group could give invaluable input to the more important Parliamentary body with the President and the leader of the opposition present.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 5:31:32 PM

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And I think that the Africans should be careful about NGO's. Mostly their staff are not as good as described in the press releases. The level of their knowledge do not justify their aura as wizards. But still, they may be helpful in obtaining grants if people in need are cunning enough. I love Ethiopia. A country in constant need for more than 40 years in the result of famine. So, sometimes you, Africans, are feeding whites who give to the Africa help.

Sometimes I wonder, how much money went into Ethiopia in comparison to the Greek bail-out.

Who knows, perhaps one day we could see Greek starving children begging for a help on the TV.

But this is not a place to discuss.
[any attempt to describe me as heart-less intellectual should be deemed futile in the fact of statistics. What did NGO's to improve the life of people in starving Ethiopia? What is the outcome of their involvement in the issue. What kind of knowledge did they pass on to improve the lives of the people in need? What kind of support did they offer to improve the lives of people who constantly ask for more than 40 years for help? What had been the level of education of people dedicating their time to allegedly improve the lives of people in Ethiopia? Were they directed by anyone who had knowledge in the local customs, law, and business related matters? This is what makes me crazy about waste of money. People who don't have knowledge, but want to gain publicity, go into charities.]
progpen
Posted: Friday, August 04, 2017 8:32:10 AM

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taurine wrote:
...any attempt to describe me as heart-less intellectual should be deemed futile in the fact of statistics.


No, this is not the politics section. Only discussion and debate going on here.

Be kind but be fierce. You are needed now more than ever before. Take up the mantel of change. For this is your time.
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