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Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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on a lark

On a whim or fancy; for fun or as a joke. More...

KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 3:01:59 AM

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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Idiom of the Day
on a lark — On a whim or fancy; for fun or as a joke.

TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 7:11:06 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
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A certain gentleman decided to run for political office on a lark. Everyone said that he didn't have a chance. He probably agreed with them. But then he actually won. The nation (and the world) is still in absolute shock.
tomcrossson
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 3:27:03 PM

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Location: Twain Harte, California, United States
I often used the phrase "a bug up one's ass" as well. < TH >
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 5:39:10 PM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Origin


There are several possible derivations of the word 'lark' in this context. 'Larking about' or 'lark about' (sometimes used as 'larking around' or 'lark around') has been used to mean 'getting up to mischief; playing the fool' since at least the middle of the 19th century. At source its origins may well be somewhat earlier than that; how much earlier depends on which of the proposed origins proves to be correct. The principal theories are that either:

'Larking' derives from the Yorkshire dialect word 'lake', meaning 'to amuse oneself'; for example, in a book by William of Palerne, circa 1350:

[He] layked him long while to lesten at mere. [listen to merriment]

'The Yorkshire pronunciation of 'lake' sounds like 'laik', which could be mistaken for 'lark' outside the county.

or:

'Larking' derives from 'skylark' and alludes to the well-known aerial acrobatics of the European Skylark. When they are on the ground these inconspicuous little birds look like what birdwatchers disparagingly call LBJs - 'little brown jobs'. In the air and singing they are transformed into one of nature's wonders - spiralling upward and trilling an exquisite song. Of course, skylarks were the inspiration for the UK's favourite piece of classical music - Ralph Vaughn Williams' The Lark Ascending. They also appear to have inspired sailors to describe lads who played around in the rigging of ships as skylarks. This term appears to have been coined with reference to the earlier name 'mudlarks' - the children who played and scavenged about the shoreline. Skylarks were first defined in a rather unlikely source, The Student's Comprehensive Anglo-Bengali Dictionary, Kanta, 1802:

Skylarking, the act of running about the rigging of a vessel in sport; frolicking.

The use of 'lark' as a verb begins soon after that, as in an entry for 1813 in the diary of Lieutenant Colonel Peter Hawker:

"Having larked all the way down the road."

Read more: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/lark-about.html



http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/lark-about.html
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