The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Quid Pro Quo Options
Bedells
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 2:11:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/14/2015
Posts: 2,839
Neurons: 516,128
Today, when watching TV, I heard someone saying, "We help each other. Quid pro quo." When searching for the meaning, I realized that using quid pro quo with that meaning is actually a quid pro quo!


The correct latin expression referring to two people who help each other is do ut des.
Gabriel82
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 2:51:19 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/22/2017
Posts: 35
Neurons: 43,833
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas, United States
Bedells wrote:
Today, when watching TV, I heard someone saying, "We help each other. Quid pro quo." When searching for the meaning, I realized that using quid pro quo with that meaning is actually a quid pro quo!


The correct latin expression referring to two people who help each other is do ut des.


Nice catch.

People are supposed to use "quid pro quo" when one gains an advantage over another or it's a mutually beneficial exchange--but usually in an unethical and illegal way. This can happen in any profession, from teaching to politics. Usually it deals with someone doing something for someone else and that person "looks the other way" while the illegal activity occurs; however, that person overlooking the illegal activity expects a "favor" of the same kind later.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 2:58:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,456
Neurons: 61,611
Yes, but this is not about the people -it is about what they do. The implied deal.
This action in exchange for that action. So, not a replacement, really.

Quid is neuter - a thing, not a person.
Masculine/feminine:
quis, quem, cuius, quo.
Eg
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
neuter:
quid, quid
He
quidnunc.as

Edit
I see the post above. I've never heard it used just about the people - it always seems to me to be about the things they can do for each other. Tit for tat, but in a cooperative way. - that seems the correct usage to me? Think

Gabriel82
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 3:22:26 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/22/2017
Posts: 35
Neurons: 43,833
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas, United States
thar wrote:
Yes, but this is not about the people -it is about what they do. The implied deal.
This action in exchange for that action. So, not a replacement, really.

Quid is neuter - a thing, not a person.
Masculine/feminine:
quis, quem, cuius, quo.
Eg
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
neuter:
quid, quid
He
quidnunc.as

Edit
I see the post above. I've never heard it used just about the people - it always seems to me to be about the things they can do for each other. Tit for tat, but in a cooperative way. - that seems the correct usage to me? Think



It is about the thing, but it involves two people deciding to engage in the same act. This has occurred in teaching for years--although of course stated in ethics codes that it will never happen. In one school district, an obviously incompetent assistant principal that had only served 2 years in administration and was very young (and rarely enforced the student code of conduct except in the worst and most obvious cases) got promoted to academic dean because she had a deal with the outgoing principal that if she overlooked a lot of student misconduct that she would get the promotion--and she did--because all the misconduct that assistant principal swept under the rug kept the head principal from looking incompetent. Turns out that outgoing principal then got promoted to assistant superintendent. Neither earned the promotion and much less so the assistant principal because to become academic dean, one needs to have shown even-handed use and application of the student code of conduct against all violations big and small.

At other times, the benefit is deferred and the party performing the favor says "I'll do this, but I will call in this favor in the future when I really need it."
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 6:37:01 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 12,368
Neurons: 37,643
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Like Thar, I've not come across the expression used the way you say, Gabrielle. Elsewhere it's usually confined to the Law, or the professional sector - used about people exchanging skill sets, or doing each other reciprocal favours: the favours done quid pro quo are understood to be pro bono, unless otherwise negotiated.

I've never heard of the negative meaning regarding criminals or at least unethical persons. Perhaps it's understood differently in different countries? Or perhaps I'm naive?
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.