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kibitzing Options
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 6:36:09 AM
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Joined: 10/16/2016
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
Hello there, here is my question:


Do you use or hear the word kibitz in everyday conversation?







Thank you.


Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 6:44:09 AM

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I don't here in the UK our North American friends may have a different view.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
TMe
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 8:48:34 AM

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No. Sparingly used in AE. Kibitz=converse

I am a layman.
hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 8:51:47 AM

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Hi almo 1,
I've missed 'ya... Drool

Yes, the word is one I frequently use when chatting with friends, however, (only in an informal manner), most likely because this Yiddish word's origin is colloquial German (which I am half...other half, Boriqua!). d'oh!

For those of you who may not know its meaning, it's synonymous with a busybody, interloper, pry, poke, intrude, intervene or maybe just having fun...guess it's a nicer word when you say you are kibitzing with your friends, and not insulting. Anxious

Have a blessed weekend,
hedy Dancing

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
TMe
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 9:19:28 AM

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..hedy, is 'kidding' the same as kibitzing?

I am a layman.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 10:01:58 AM

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I wouldn't at all say that 'kidding' is the same as 'kibitzing'.

As Hedy said, it is interfering, prying, intruding, meddling.

kibitz vb
(intr) informal US and Canadian to interfere or offer unwanted advice, esp as a spectator at a card game

Noun 1. kibitzer - (Yiddish) a meddler who offers unwanted advice to others

I've very rarely heard it - and then only in connection to a card game (someone who walks behind the players looking at people's cards and telling them how they should play).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 10:26:24 AM

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This is, as Dragon says, Yiddish in origin - ie from the language of Central and East European (Ashkenazi) Jews.

A few Yiddish words have made it into BE, but it is mostly an American (and regional American, oresumably) phenomenon.
About 2 Million Yiddish-spoeaking Jews emigrated to America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century (before it was made impossible by Nazism and Stalinism).
At some points they comprised more than half the new European immigrants. And probably had a disproportionate influence on the American language, given their influence in the entertainment industries. Think
And some words just have a ring, fill an expressive need, and make it into mainstream culture.
So there are quite a few distinctive Yiddish words in certain styles of American language. I assume they are more common in New York than Wyoming!

I don't know about this one. I have never heard it, to my knowledge.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 11:53:51 AM

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Probably the most common British phrase for this is "back seat driver".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
palapaguy
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 1:04:27 PM

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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
almo 1 wrote:
Hello there, here is my question:


Do you use or hear the word kibitz in everyday conversation?


Thank you.




It used to be quite common in spoken AE back around the 1950s in the Northeast US. Now it is less common.
thar
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 3:34:36 PM

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Why are so many of these Yiddish words negative?
Kibbitz , kvatch, schmooze, schtick; klutz, putz, nebbicher,schlemiel, schmuck, schmo; meshuggener; glitch, kitsch, schmaltz;

Chutzpah, schtum- good or bad, I guess.
Maven is good in a caustic way.
Nosh - not exactly classy.

Just good? - Think - Mensch? Really, not loads springing to mind.

I am not thinking of the Yiddish vocabulary, of course. I am sure it is full of positives. Just the words that have made it into mainstream English, and their nuance in English.

(Omitting the vast number for penis- everybody loves a good euphemism! Whistle )
hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 3:49:48 PM

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TMe wrote:
..hedy, is 'kidding' the same as kibitzing?


TMe, no it's not the same....'kidding' is more like 'bantering'....'kibitzing' is more like 'busybodying'...
I 'kid' you not...I'm just in the mood to 'banter' about 'kibitzing', and while I'm at it, let me add that you should have placed 3 dots, not 2 before my name.
If you want to know why...that's another thread!

palapaguy, watch it with 'now it's less common'...I was 3 in the 1950's...and I'm still not old! (Only kidding!)

DragOnspeaker, remind me not to kibitz during a card game...I promise not to look at your cards!

thar, kibitz is a Yiddish word, BUT its origin is colloquial German...I liked your post though, it was very informative, 'Wyomingite'....
(I'm a New Yorker...what do you call folks from Wyoming?)

I just crossed with you thar, we posted the same time!...'chutzpah' is a good word. Yiddish words don't sound bad so we use them...you can't use too many Spanish words like 'puta' because everybody knows it's a bad word...oh well!

Enough 'bantering'...hope we've learned almo 1 good!
hedy


"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Joseph San George
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 8:27:29 PM

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Location: Mesa, Arizona, United States
It's rarely used although it should be recognized by most literate people. It means, of course, to present/add advice or suggestions to someone else currently engaged in a problem of some sort. The problem need not be overly vexing, just require a moment's hesitation that allows for the kitbitzer to do some kibitzing. It's usually associated with a negative context provided either by the person pondering the problem as an interruption to his concentration or, for example, if that person is engaged in a game or contest, his opponents will show annoyance at advice being offered that may contribute to the loss of the game.

In my experience, my first exposure to the word came during a a pool game, perhaps more universally known as billiards. There, as the player about to execute a shot looked at the pool table for the best shot, a "poolside" observer offered up a comment such as "try the five ball." This is kibitzing. Offering up gratuitous advice.

Again, not often heard as the inviting circumstance is not often presented. Yet, it is a very distinctive word ( Jewish in origin I believe) that would cause literate or knowledgeable individuals familiarly.
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 8:36:25 PM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan



Thank you very much!


¡Muchas gracias!


Vielen Dank!




Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, July 31, 2017 11:20:08 AM

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Joined: 5/29/2012
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Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Kibitzer is used in Deep Fritz chess program.



"A "Kibitzer" is a person who watches a game in progress without making any moves
himself. A kibitzer is also notorious for giving advice and knowing everything better.
You can add a kibitzer by selecting an engine in the select box that appears.
A new engine window appears in which it can work parallel to the one already loaded.
You can use one or more kibitzers (up to six) to help you in your game against the
primary engine, or you can use them for a second opinion on a position you are
analysing. Remember that they will be sharing the processor power, so the quality of
analysis sinks with every added kibitzer."


I used this feature within Deep Fritz and it plays the role of a 'sidekick'.
Those two words are close to the more plain 'assistant'.

As you can see, three kibitzers are giving their advises:



The funny aspect of 'kibitzer' is that it can be:

very aggressive kibitzer
"Stockfish is, as Kaufman suggests, very aggressive..."

tactical juggernaut kibitzer
"Houdini is a tactical juggernaut."

positionally accurate kibitzer
"Kaufman argues that his engine, Komodo, is the most positionally accurate of the three..."

Source:
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/deep-fritz-14/

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 4:25:20 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Hey Joseph - lovely to welcome you to TFD. Have read your posts with pleasure.

However, just one tiny thing about TFD - it is multi-cultural. English-speakers from England, India, Pakistan, Australia, Finland, Iceland, France, Mexico etc. etc. are regular contributors. The majority of these people ARE literate. But I don't think any of us have ever heard this Jewish word which is used in American English.

For this reason we usually do differentiate between the various English dialects: so being a 'literate' person has different criteria in different countries - and doesn't necessarily form a common, quantifiable, benchmark across all languages. That's why we usually say "Well in AE no literate person would not know..." or "In Indian English it's considered slang" etc." We all learn so much about language this way, we've discovered.

Anyway - just thought, if you are going to stay with us (which I hope you will), it might be helpful to know this? Not criticising, just trying to be helpful.
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 7:42:10 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 685
Neurons: 3,035
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan







"Not criticising, just trying to be helpful" said Kibitzer.







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