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What can I call a person who is going to take a test? Options
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 5:16:02 AM

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Hi,
If a person is going to take a test, what can I call him/her?
I think "tester/examiner" can be called for those who test other persons. I.e they can only be for a person who tests something, especially a new product.
All products are tested blindly, so testers are not influenced by designer names and fancy packaging.

I can call him/her a test-taking person.
Getting high score, I think, is relevant to how smart a test-taking person is. Though I haven't yet taken any TOEFL test.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 6:50:25 AM

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The standard word is 'a candidate'.

Quote:
candidate (ˈkændɪˌdeɪt; -dɪt)
n
2. a person taking an examination or test




srirr
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 7:53:08 AM

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We also call examinee.



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, July 29, 2017 5:15:20 AM

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thar wrote:
The standard word is 'a candidate'.

Quote:

2. a person taking an examination or test





Thank you both of you very much.
Yes. But you think " an examination or test-taking person." is not correct.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, July 29, 2017 7:42:36 AM
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NOT A TEACHER

Yesterday I was watching an American TV comedy. I heard dialogue something along the lines of this:



Man: I'm a truck driver. My company wants all of us to take a test on good driving. They gave us a study guide. I'm not going to waste time studying it.

Man's mother: Dear, you should study it.

Man: Why?

Man's mother: Now dear, you know that you are not a good test taker. So you need to study the guide carefully. I will help you prepare for the test.
palapaguy
Posted: Saturday, July 29, 2017 10:42:02 AM

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"Test taker" is a common term, much less formal than "examinee" or "candidate."
Romany
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 3:39:03 AM
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Palapugy -

Have never heard 'test-taker' said anywhere - it sounds more like something children say rather than adults? (What I mean is, is that what the kids themselves say?)
thar
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 6:24:34 AM

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I agree. I have never heard of a test-taker. Examinee, maybe, but that is not the most common choice, candidate is, in BE.

In Parser's piece, a bad test-taker is someone who is bad at taking tests (all tests, any test - they get nervous and screw it up) It is different from being a bad candidate (who is not competent). So it needs that specific wording.





There really is no informal way to take tests, I think! If it isn't important, you are just a pupil/student/learner.
If it is important enough for you be 'be' something, it is important enough for you to be called a candidate! d'oh!
palapaguy
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 12:07:16 PM

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Hi Romany and Thar,

"Test taker" is, in my experience, quite common in informal AE, especially in children's situations and grade school classroom exercises. "Examinee" is more formal and implies structured or meaningful examination in employment or academic settings. "Candidate" is different - one may be under consideration for some type of award or recognition without an examination or test.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 12:08:24 PM

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Can be 'a patient'.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
palapaguy
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 12:27:20 PM

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"In Parser's piece, a bad test-taker is someone who is bad at taking tests (all tests, any test - they get nervous and screw it up) It is different from being a bad candidate (who is not competent). So it needs that specific wording.

. . .

There really is no informal way to take tests, I think! If it isn't important, you are just a pupil/student/learner.
If it is important enough for you be 'be' something, it is important enough for you to be called a candidate! d'oh! [/quote]"

I think the disconnect here is in what the word "test" implies. In my experience, "test" can imply either an important examination with academic or career ramifications, or a simple, casual social event that's soon forgotten after it occurs. Context will indicate which of these applies, and I understood the original question to be the latter.
palapaguy
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 12:36:26 PM

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thar wrote:
I agree. I have never heard of a test-taker. Examinee, maybe, but that is not the most common choice, candidate is, in BE.

In Parser's piece, a bad test-taker is someone who is bad at taking tests (all tests, any test - they get nervous and screw it up) It is different from being a bad candidate (who is not competent). So it needs that specific wording.





There really is no informal way to take tests, I think! If it isn't important, you are just a pupil/student/learner.
If it is important enough for you be 'be' something, it is important enough for you to be called a candidate! d'oh!


INVIGILATOR?! Anxious
That was a new word for me. "Proctor" would be far more widely understood in AE.
srirr
Posted: Monday, July 31, 2017 12:46:28 AM

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In India, both invigilator and proctor are common words in academia. However the meaning differs. A proctor is commonly understood to be an administrative designation, who takes care of discipline and somewhat general administration of the institution. An invigilator is strictly associated with examinations only, a person who supervises candidates during examination, maintains discipline in the room.



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Romany
Posted: Monday, July 31, 2017 4:10:52 AM
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One thing I didn't know till I began work in my current place, is that the word invigilator which, all my life, I've only heard used in exam situations, is used more widely.

Each time we, or any of museums put on an exhibition of art, textiles, costume etc. we all have to take turn in being invigilators - as I've been doing over the weekend.Strangely (to me at first) as invigilators we are also there to talk about the collection and answer questions - rather a reversal of any invigilating Id done before!

A 'proctor' is the title of the person/s on campus who are specifically employed to ensure students aren't breaking campus rules or getting up to mischief. There have been proctors at Oxford and Cambridge since Medieval times and hundreds of stories and folklore have grown up around them. They have nothing whatever to do with invigilators.

We've had quite a few American colleagues who didn't understand the word "invigilator" - but until now had never heard of a "proctor" in this position. But, even worse, in hunting about, I even saw "proctor" used as a verb - which I'm sure would either amuse or enrage any British proctor who saw it!

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 31, 2017 7:09:27 AM

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Romany wrote:
But, even worse, in hunting about, I even saw "proctor" used as a verb - which I'm sure would either amuse or enrage any British proctor who saw it!

But everyone knows that the verb-form is "to proct" - conjugated in a similar way to "to grok". Liar Anxious

I 'dug around' in the etymological section - quite amazing how these words all relate:
Proctor - someone who keeps discipline
Proc'tor (abbreviation of 'procurator') attested in the fourteenth century
Procurator - deputised governor (particularly in charge of tax-collecting) in the Roman Empire
Proxy - a deputy, lieutenant, someone with power of attorney.
Procure - to represent another in a purchase or financial arrangement.
Procurer - someone who represents another in purchasing 'sexual services'.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 3:56:30 AM
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Actually, it was far worse: the naked verb was "procterize" which my spell-check is protesting vigorously!

ps. When my father first started working with a certain American company his title was "Procurements Officer". My mother used to shriek with laughter and instead of merely saying he worked for that particular company, would take enormous delight in regaling people with the full title- and then shriek with laughter; and they would all sit around giggling and making bad puns!

Unfortunately, I was too young to understand the connotations so am pretty sure I too would have gone around telling people my father was a procurer. The nuns must have have gone hoarse praying for us!
palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 10:54:16 AM

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Romany wrote:

One thing I didn't know till I began work in my current place, is that the word invigilator which, all my life, I've only heard used in exam situations, is used more widely.

Each time we, or any of museums put on an exhibition of art, textiles, costume etc. we all have to take turn in being invigilators - as I've been doing over the weekend.Strangely (to me at first) as invigilators we are also there to talk about the collection and answer questions - rather a reversal of any invigilating Id done before!

A 'proctor' is the title of the person/s on campus who are specifically employed to ensure students aren't breaking campus rules or getting up to mischief. There have been proctors at Oxford and Cambridge since Medieval times and hundreds of stories and folklore have grown up around them. They have nothing whatever to do with invigilators.

We've had quite a few American colleagues who didn't understand the word "invigilator" - but until now had never heard of a "proctor" in this position. But, even worse, in hunting about, I even saw "proctor" used as a verb - which I'm sure would either amuse or enrage any British proctor who saw it!


Yep. Out here in the Colonies we frequently use "proctor" as a verb.

I'd like to know this: Do invigilators invigilate?
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 11:22:19 AM
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Indeed they do! I've been invigilating my bottom off this weekend, and will have to also invigilate our next Art Exhibition.
George Weischadle
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 1:02:41 PM

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Romany wrote:

Indeed they do! I've been invigilating my bottom off this weekend, and will have to also invigilate our next Art Exhibition.

The mind boggles ... Anxious
George Weischadle
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 1:04:44 PM

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Romany wrote:

Indeed they do! I've been invigilating my bottom off this weekend, and will have to also invigilate our next Art Exhibition.

The mind boggles ... Anxious
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 1:50:42 PM

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I've never before heard of the word "invigilator", and I'm quite sure I shall never use it.

I wouldn't expect "test taker" to be in a dictionary, even though I've probably heard it (and may even have said it) from time to time. Its meaning is so plain and obvious that nobody would think it needs to be noticed by the lexicographers.

Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 4:07:31 PM

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Good job for the testee that the etymology of proctoring is not linked to that of a proctologist. Whistle

Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 4:14:41 PM

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Hope123 wrote:
Good job for the testee that the etymology of proctoring is not linked to that of a proctologist. Whistle

But that does relate to Romany's last comment . . .

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 4:41:26 PM
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Ah you *did* actually catch my little train of thought above? It amused me but I thought that was just me.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 4:46:48 PM

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It all comes of playing the Association (psychoanalysis) Game in the Games Forum!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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