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Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (10 BCE) Options
Daemon
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Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (10 BCE)

The nephew of Tiberius, Claudius became the Roman emperor unexpectedly, after Caligula was murdered. Sickly, unattractive, and scholarly, he tended to disfavor the upper classes and cater to the freedmen. He expanded the frontiers, invading Britain in 43 CE. He spent lavishly on public works and extended Roman citizenship throughout the empire. Having executed his scheming third wife, he married his niece, who then likely poisoned him. What modern diagnoses might explain his lifelong ill health? More...
KSPavan
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Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (10 BCE)
The nephew of Tiberius, Claudius became the Roman emperor unexpectedly, after Caligula was murdered. Sickly, unattractive, and scholarly, he tended to disfavor the upper classes and cater to the freedmen. He expanded the frontiers, invading Britain in 43 CE. He spent lavishly on public works and extended Roman citizenship throughout the empire. Having executed his scheming third wife, he married his niece, who then likely poisoned him.
monamagda
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According to the historian Suetonius, Claudius' knees were weak... sometimes giving way under him... and his head shook. He stammered and his speech was confused. He slobbered and his nose ran when he was excited. [If some of this sounds like George Bush... dodging shoes, stumbling over words, being confused, and so forth... well... George has in fact claimed, indirectly, to have Claudius’ genes in his heritage. Seriously. They didn’t call him “Shrub” for nothing, you know!]

The Stoic Seneca was also less than complimentary in describing Claudius' voice as belonged to no known land animal, and that his hands were weak. Seneca does relent, however, in that he reported Claudius as showing no physical deformity, and instead, that when Claudius was calm and seated, he was a tall, well-built figure of dignitas. At the same time, when angered or stressed, his symptoms became worse. Historians agree that this condition improved upon his accession to the throne. Claudius himself claimed that he had exaggerated his ailments to save his own life. [He may have also claimed that the devil made him do it. But that was much later.]

The modern diagnosis varies. Pre World War II, infantile paralysis (or polio) was widely accepted as the cause, and was the diagnosis used in Robert Graves' Claudius novels, first published in the 1930s. Polio, however, does not explain many of the described symptoms, and a more recent theory implicates cerebral palsy as the cause. Tourette syndrome is also a possible candidate.

http://www.halexandria.org/dward931.htm
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