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Gypsy Options
TiMonster
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 5:31:19 AM
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Location: Orléans, Centre, France
Hi everybody, it has been a few days since I last encountered some unknown English phrases but I stumbled upon one this morning :

The smoke curled into the form of a gypsy moth.

My question here is : What is the meaning of the word "gypsy" in this particular sentence.

I know this refers to a certain comunity but it seems unlikely considering the fact that it qualifies a butterfly. So I thought there might be an other meaning that I was not aware of.

Thank you
TMe
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 6:08:17 AM

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Gypsy mothare an invasive insect that, as caterpillars, have hairy bodies dotted with blue and red spots. When they hatch, they’re only about one-sixteenth of an inch, but can grow to be more than three inches long by the time they form cocoons about six weeks later.

They were introduced to Massachusetts in the late 1860s by E. Leopold Trouvelot, who brought them to Medford from France to study the caterpillars for silk production.




I am a layman.
TiMonster
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 6:12:37 AM
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Location: Orléans, Centre, France
Oh, I see my mistake !
srirr
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 3:20:00 AM

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If you were in India, you would have got another meaning for gypsy.
A popular vehicle model is called Gypsy. :) And, it has no connection to racism.



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 8:59:56 AM

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The actual gypsy moth is normal moth-shaped:



Then there's also a ship and a pub . . .





Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TiMonster
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 9:47:21 AM
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Location: Orléans, Centre, France
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The actual gypsy moth is normal moth-shaped:



Then there's also a ship and a pub . . .





Yes, I did some researching to verify the information :)
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 12:34:29 PM

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Out of many meanings of gypsy,TiMonster, we are required to see which meaning fits. The adjective 'gypsy' refers to a moth, its not an independent word here. So one has looks with reference to context.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:11:48 PM

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I would argue that "gyspy" here is a noun not an adjective it's not describing an attribute of the term moth, but is part of the name of a species.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:57:28 PM

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Diversion, I know.

The boat used for Chichester's circumnavigation was actually named after an aircraft, the de Havilland Gipsy Moth.

He flew them.

Tiger Moth and Leopard Moth are more famous, but Gypsy Moth was the innovation.








Quote:
From 1925 to 1939 – and on through the Second World War – on two sites, first Stag Lane and then Hatfield – the De Havilland Company designed and produced a series of interelated light aircraft which were to change aviation forever. So ubiquitous did these revolutionary aircraft become that soon every small, single-engined aircraft was being refered to as ‘a Moth’ (rather like how, post-war, a vacuum-cleaner was refered to as ‘a Hoover’). There was some truth behind this, as at one point over 6o% of ALL British-registered single-engined aircraft WERE Moths.

DH 60 variants were powered by Cirrus, Genet and Cirrus Hermes engines, but it wasn’t until the amazing DH Gipsy engine was developed that the Moth family came into their own. The D.H. 60G Gipsy Moth (first flown in 1928) rapidly evolved into a world-beating long-distance aircraft, including such feats as the first solo flight by a woman between England and Australia (May 5th -May 24th, 1930) by the famous Amy Johnson in her Gipsy Moth ,’Jason’, G-AAAH, which is now displayed in the Science Museum, London.





You can see they all have the moth logo



Quote:

By arranging the Gipsy engine to run inverted (in the Gipsy II) de Havillands were able vastly improve the vision of the pilot, and also reduce the chances of the propeller tips striking the ground during take off. The resulting aircraft was called the D.H.60G III Moth Major, and began to be ordered by flying clubs during 1932. During the 1930s de Havillands produced a whole family of light aircraft, including the D.H.80A Puss Moth (1930), D.H. 60T Moth Trainer (1931), D.H.83 Fox Moth (1932), D.H.85 Leopard Moth (1933) carrying between two and four persons. However, it wasn’t until the RAF forced a revision of the Moth biplane’s wing planform (Air Ministry Specification 15/31), to enable the front-seat passenger to have a reasonable chance of escaping the aircraft by parachute, that the immortal D.H. 82A Tiger Moth was born. This was ordered in huge quantities as the standard trainer of the RAF, and was also built in Australia and Canada during WW2.






Whistle
Applause

srirr
Posted: Sunday, July 30, 2017 8:05:17 AM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
I would argue that "gyspy" here is a noun not an adjective it's not describing an attribute of the term moth, but is part of the name of a species.


I second.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
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